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March 30, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-30

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 30, 1990

IFC,
by Tim Gammons

'U' Pres. discuss stereotypes

I

The common stereotype of
drunken, rowdy fraternity activity is
a misconception, said members of
the Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC) to
University President James
Duderstadt, interim Vice-President
Mary Ann Swain and Shirley
Clarkson, special assistant to
Duderstadt, in a meeting Wednesday.
The greek system has been
criticized by the administration in
the past for alcohol abuse and
littering the campus with
promotional leaflets for greek
events.
Eric Reicin, IFC Vice President
and an LSA junior, said Duderstadt
was "fantastically receptive. I was
very pleased with the President, Dr.

Swain and Shirley. They encouraged
our activities."
In their meeting, the IFC also
informed administrators about the
educational activities which they
sponsor. "The fraternity system has
increased its support on campus in
the past year," said Reicin, adding
that greeks have been responsible for
a number of campus oriented events
this year.
"We ran an Alcohol Awareness
event. This is a national event, but
not for greeks," Reicin said. "As far
as I know, we're the only Big Ten
school to have greek participation."
"President Duderstadt was very
glad to hear what they were doing."
Clarkson said. "The fraternity

system houses 20 percent of
University students, and he was very
encouraged to hear about dry rush
and the educational programs they
are involved with."
"I was very pleased
with the President,
Dr. Swain and Shirley.
They encouraged our
activities," -Eric Reicin
lFC Vice President
Reicin also said the IFC
sponsored a sexual awareness
program with University Health
Services. The event was designed to
educate students about sexual

assault, AIDS, and other sexually
transmitted diseases.
Polly Paulson, University Health
Services counselor, said four peer
counselors from the University
Health Services visited the Phi
Gamma Delta house for the
program. Their sister sorority,
Kappa Alpha Theta, also attended the
event. "It went very well. They had
over a hundred people," said
Paulson. "That's the largest program
we've ever had."
The IFC also organized a post-
rush clean-up. "The Saturday after
(rush), members of each fraternity
mct in the diag to take down the
rush flyers and posters that had been
posted around campus. We clean up
our own mess," said Reicin.

MEALS
Continued from page 1
Plus" system. Under present Univer-
sity policies, all students living in
the residence halls are billed for thir-
teen meals a week, whether or not
they eat them.
"What we're pushing for is
spreading those meals out. You get
400 meals for the year, and you can
budget your meals however you
want."
The two CC members are also
pushing for smaller 100- and 200-
meals-a-year plans for off-campus
students.
This may all be feasible, Kysia
said, but these policies would have
ruinous consequences on the Univer-
sity Food Services (UFS), and could
result in the closing of many cafete-
rias.
"Currently, UFS is operating on
a break-even system," Kysia said,
explaining that the cafeterias must
make estimates on the number of
students they will have to serve.
"If we move to an all 'Entree
Plus' system, cafeterias that are inef-
ficient, that don't serve enough peo-
ple to pay their bills, will be shut
down, and students from several
dorms will have to share one cafete-
ria," he said.
Associate Housing Director Dave
Foulke confirmed Kysia's asses-

ment.
"Everyone wants increased flexi-
bility in the meal credit program,"
Foulke said. "But they must under-
stand the costs involved."
"Everyone agrees that we can
make improvements to the univer-
sity's meal credit policies - even
the people in the housing office,"
said Kolasa. "But you can't change
multi-million dollar operations
overnight."
"CC has said that they're picking
up the ball; well, picking up the ball
is not throwing it at some-ones
head," Kolasa said.
"Housing is not out to screw
people here - they're working hard
to find a system with greater flexi-
bility, that would still allow the
cafeterias to break even," Kysia said.
Other Universities bring in pri-
vate for-profit corporations to man-
age their meal service, the RHA
members explained. These corpora-
tions can afford to give students
greater flexibility in meal payment,
because they are not concerned with
breaking even.
Both Rielly and Sciarotta stressed
they were not demanding anything
from the Housing Office, and only
want to suggest some ideas.
"We just want to push for
change, and so far our ideas have
been fairly well-received by the Meal
Credit Reform Board," said Rielly.

ETHICS
Continued from Page 1
Kysia also said the CC campaign
implies that if students vote for
them, the meal credit reform will be
instituted immediately. That is not
the case, said RHA members, who
pointed out that any policy changes
accepted by the Housing Office
would not take effect for up to three
years.
"The leases for next year have al-
ready been signed," Kysia said. "No
changes will be made for next year.
People voting for the CC now may
not be living in the residence halls
when the policies change several
years down the line."
RHA leaders also say their offers
of cooperation with the CC were re-
jected, because the CC is using the
issue for political gain.
"I approached Aaron on March
14, and asked him if the CC would
be interested in joining forces with
RHA and he laughed at me," Kolasa
said. "Williams said that RHA was
too non-confrontational and was not
doing anything on the issue, and be-
sides, it was one of CC's campaign
promises."
However, Williams says he did
not have this conversation with Ko-
lasa.
James Blickensdorf, another RHA
member who a approached Williams

was told the assembly as a whole
was not working on the issue, but
"there might be some individuals on
MSA that might be working on it."
Housing Office administrators are
confused at the proceedings, and say
that Rielly and Sciarotta have not
made it clear who they are represent-
ing in their reform efforts.
"My understanding is that they
are independent students acting on a
CC campaign pledge," said Associ-
ate Housing Director David Foulke.
RHA members say Rielly and
Sciarotta have told different parties
different stories, in an effort to con-
ceal ties to the CC and the MSA.
But Sciarotta denied any misrep-
resentation. "We have done nothing
wrong or misrepresented MSA,"
Sciarotta stressed. "We made it clear
on our petition that this was a CC
campaign pledge from last semester.
It made no mention that we were op-
erating through MSA. I made it
specifically clear that we were not
working through MSA."
Yet RHA representatives-say the
tactics used by the CC may have
jeopardized any chance at concrete
policy reforms.
"We're concerned that they've
hurt the chances for any meal credit
changes, by doing it the wrong
way," Kolasa said.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Bush proposes AIDS funding
WASHINGTON - President Bush declared his administration "on a
wartime footing" against AIDS yesterday and called for compassion, not
discrimination, toward people infected with the virus.
"Our goal is to turn irrational-fear into rational acts," he said in his
first major presidential address on AIDS.
Addressing the National Leadership Coalition on AIDS, he said that
education is the key to curbing the spread of the deadly disease.
Bush presented no new policy initiatives; instead he spotlighted his
unprecedented proposal for $3.5 billion in federal spending for AIDS re-
search, treatment and education.
AIDS activists dismissed the proposal as a small fraction of what is
needed to find a cure and to treat victims.
Michigan businesses to
recycle waste paper
LANSING - Corporations and environmental groups, often at odds
over environmental concerns, proposed yesterday a plan to cut in half the
amount of waste paper going into Michigan landfills within a decade.
The proposal from the Great Lakes Regional Corporate Environmental
Council calls on corporations to collect and recycle their office paper, buy
recycled paper products, and use recycled newsprint and packaging mate-
rial.
Michigan residents toss out about 12 million tons of garbage annu-
ally, including about 2 million tons of recyclable waste paper.
The report encourages businesses to boost the market for recycled
products with their own purchases, thus creating a demand for newspapers
and other material that would otherwise go into landfills.
Disease Center says Agent
Orange not cancerous
ATLANTA - A long-awaited government study of cancer among
Vietnam veterans found no evidence linking the disease with exposure to
the herbicide Agent Orange, officials said yesterday.
The study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control did find veterans at
increased risk of a relatively rare cancer called non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
But researchers noted the risk was greater among veterans who served on
ships than those who served on land, where the herbicide was used.
In Washington, Veterans Secretary Edward Derwinski quickly said he
would order the Department of Veterans Affairs to pay disability compen-
sation to vets suffering from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
The study was immediately attacked by veterans groups, which com-
plained it failed to sufficiently examine the cancer risks among the thou-
sands of soldiers who actually worked with the dangerous herbicide during
the war.
Scientists: Greenhouse effect
caused no global warming
WASHINGTON - Ten years of weather satellite data show no evi-
dence of global warming from the greenhouse effect, scientists said yester-
day. But they added that it will take at least another decade of measure-
ments to draw a firm conclusion.
The data, collected from 1979 through 1988 by the TIROS-N series of
weather satellites, proved that the Earth's temperature can be measured ac-
curately by instruments probing the atmosphere from space, two scien-
tists say in a paper to be published Friday in Science.
"We found that the Earth's atmosphere goes through fairly large year-
to-year changes in temperature and over that 10-year period we saw no
long term warming or cooling trend," said Roy Spencer, of the Marshall
Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.
Spencer's co-investigator, John Christy of the University of Alabama,
Huntsville, said that there were temperature swings "that can be quite
dramatic" during the decade, but, on a global basis, the thermal changes
tended to even out.

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S

Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Pastor, Rev. Don Postema
1236 Washtenaw Ct. (668-7421,662-2402)
Sunday, April 1-
Celebrate April Fool's Day with
Rev. Floyd Shaffer, clown minister
10 a.m. Worship: "The Clown and Other
Fools for Christ's Sake"
12 noon-3 p.m.-a crazy lunch followed by
an afternoon of intentional foolishness
6 p.m.: Clown Service-featuring
Socataco, the Clown
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Church Chaplaincy)
218 N. Division (at Catherine)
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m.
in St. Andrews
Preacher: The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock
Celebrant: The Rev. Susan McGarry
6 p.m.-Supper
WEEKDAYS
Morning Prayer, 7:30 a.m., M-F
Evening Prayer, 5:15 p.m., M-F
Call 665-0606
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
Huron Street (between State & Division)
SUNDAYS:
Worship-955
Bible Study Groups-11:20
WEDNESDAYS:
Student Fellowship Supper
and Bible Study-5:30
For information, call 663-9376
Robert B. Wallace & Mark Wilson, pastors
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Sunday Worship at 9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Ministry
Innovative, informal communion services
Dinner following
Thurs., 5:30-6:15; Worship in Curtis Room
Faith Exploration. Discussion Group,
exploring various Biblical themes,
Every Sun., 9:30-10:50 a.m.
French Rm.
Continental Breakfast Served
Info., 662-4466-Rev. Amy Morrison
Everyone Welcome!
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest at Hill Street
Sunday Worship at 10 a.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Worship at 7:30 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
331 Thompson Street
Weekend liturgies: Sat. 5 p.m.,
Sun. 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon & 5 p.m.
Confessions, Fri. 4 to 5 p.m.
PENANCE SERVICE
WED., April 4, 7:30 p.m.
LENTEN STATIONS OF THE CROSS:
FRI. NIGHTS, 7p.m.
Graduate Student BYO Supper

Nuts and Bolts
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Calvin and Hobbes

House votes on child-care bills
WASHINGTON - The House ignored a White House veto threat yes-
terday and tentatively approved an ambitious Democratic plan aimed at
helping families find and afford day care for their children.
The House approved the plan along a largely party line vote, 263-158,
after voting more narrowly to reject a conservative alternative that Presi-
dent Bush had endorsed.
The House also turned back amendments aimed at limiting federal aid
for church-run day care centers.
The bill, which still must go to a conference to resolve differences
with the Senate, would expand tax credits for working lower-
class families to offset day care expenses.
It would create a system of state-issued subsidy vouchers for parents
who want to use religious day care centers, and would expand the Head
Start program for poor children.
It also would establish minimum standards for day care centers and
provide money for a new program of day care based in public schools.
9ibe f£wbrnau_&UI1J
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.

Flt RowitA, COME oN iN .
THANKS FOR (SANG AGAIN .
- No TRot)6l .
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by Bill Watterson
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EDTORIAL STAFF:

Q-v. CA.*-

LAW. f it

EditorSin Chief Noah Fnkelports Editor Mike Glr
Muaglng Editor Kristine LaLOnde Associate Sports Editors Steve Cohen, Andy Gottesman,
Manaing dito KritineLa~odeDavid Hyman, Eric Lemont
News Editors Karen Akedof, Marion Davis, Taior Lincoln
Tara Gruzen, Vera Songwe Arts Editors Alyssa Kat, Kulsin Pa
Opinion Page Editor David SchwartzA B o s C a z, Kn P
Asocite Editors 1. Mathew Mier, Laura Sankey Film Jon Bilk, Brent Edwards
Weekend Editors Miguel Cruz,
Kevin Woods Music Forrest Green ItI
Photo Editors Jose Juarez, David Lutirner Theater Jay Pekaa
List Editor Todd Dale
News: Geri Alumit, Josephine Balenger, Joanna Broder, Diane Cook, Heather Fee, Julie Foster, Cathy Fugate, Ian Hoffman, Mark
Katz, Christine Koostra, Ruth Ulttmarn, Josh Minick, Dan Poux, Gil Renberg, Bruce Shapiro, Mike SBbel, Michael Suivan Node
Vance, Elsabeth Winstein, Donna Woodweit.
Opinion: Mark Buchan, Yael Citro,Ilan Gray, Leslie Heibrunn, Stephen Henderson, Aarc% Robinson, Tony Siber, David Sood.
Sports: Adam Benson, Eric Berkman, Michael Bess, Andy Brown, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Jed Durst, Richard Eisen, Jared
Entin, Scott Erskine, PHIt Green, Tom Kent, Albert Ui, John Niyo, Sarah Osburn, Mat Ronnie, Jonathan Samnick, David Schecter,
Ryan Schreiber, Jeff Sheran, Dan Zodh.
Arts Greg Baise, Sheiil L Bennett, Mark Binelli, Kenneth Chow, Lyme Cohn, Beth Colquilt, Sharon Grimberg, Brian Jarvinen, Scott
Kirkwood, Mike Kuniavsky, Ami Mehta, Mike Molitor, Annette Petrusso, Jay Pinka, Antonio Roque, Ilyse Schanz, Wendy Shanker,
Peter Shapiro, Rona Sheramy, Mark Swartz, Jusine Unain, Phiip Washington, Mark Webster, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zubed.
Photo: Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Julie Hdkoan, Jonathan Uss, Josh Moore, Samantha Sanders, Kenneth Smeller, Steven
Szuch.
Weekend: Phil Cohen, Rob Earie, Donna tadipaclo, Alex Gordon, lana Trachtmn, Fred Znn.

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