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March 29, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-29

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 29, 1990

SPEAKERS
Continued from page 1
selection from the top three candi-
dates, said Judith Goodman, assistant
dean for admissions and student ser-
vices at the Business School.
In place of a guest speaker, the
College of Architecture and Urban
Planning will hear three of the col-
lege's students, said Andrew Noble,
an architecture and urban planning
senior on the college's commence-
ment committee.
"They (guest speakers) tend to
run too long, and we have to get out
ly 2:30," he said.
- "Last year they had a speaker, and
he didn't really have much rele-
vance," said Heather Taylor, an ar-
chitecture senior and co-coordinator
of the student slide show for the cer-
emony.
Though Noble said he approved
of having student speakers, he was
disappointed the college did not have
a guest speaker.
3RD WARD
Continued from page 1
should be done by the city and also
supports the implementation of a
comprehensive recycling program.
She criticized current council Repub-
licans for "foot-dragging" on the im-
plementing such policies.
Voters should ask themselves, "Is
Ann Arbor being run in the public
interest or is it being run in the spe-
cial interests?" Brater said.
In order to ease rising property
taxes the city should work through
the state government in Lansing,
Brater said. She added that she was
skeptical about implementing a city
income tax that would cost a million
dollars to administer.
Copi suggested the city should
rise parking fees and parking fines
to raise revenue for the city in order

At the Residential College, all
119 graduates and RC director Herb
Eagle will speak in lieu of a guest,
said Sheila Wilder, Eagle's assistant.
Information and Library Studies
graduates, instead of attending their
'The first person we
asked had a heart
attack and a stroke,
the second person
had a gall bladder
removed'
- Marjorie Levy
Art School dean
own separate ceremony, will join
Rackham graduates in the Clements
library.
Commencement speakers for the
School of Art, Law School, School
of Social Work, and the Graduate
School have not been confirmed.

"The first person we asked had a
heart attack and a stroke, the second
person had a gall bladder removed. It
will be someone with a Michigan
connection and an art connection and
has a close relationship to the (art)
family," said Marjorie Levy, Art
School dean.
Thenfollowing speakers have
been confirmed for the listed
schools:
Architecture&Urban Planning:
student speakers.
Business Administration:
Frank Poposs, president of the Dow
Chemical Company.
UDentistry: June Osborn, dean
of the University's School of Public
Health.
H Education: Deborah Meier,
principal of Central Park East
Secondary School in New York
City.
Engineering: University
President James Duderstadt.
ELSA: Lawrence Kasdan, film
director.

Medicine: Louis Sullivan,
Secretary of the Dept. of Health &
Human Services.
Medicine honors ceremony:
Francis Collins,University assosi-
cate professor of internal medicine.
EMusic: Dean Bolas, President,
Interlochen Center for the Arts.
I Natural Resources: James
Crowfoot, dean, School of Natural
Resources.
U Steven Yaffee, professor,
School of Natural Resources.
Nursing: Sue Hegyvary, dean
of Nursing at School at Washington.
Pharmacy: Henri Manasse,
dean, College of Pharmacy at
University of Illinois-Chicago.
Physical Education: Bo
Schembechler, former Michigan
football coach and athletic director.
Public Health: Myron
Allukian,asst. deputy commissioner,
Dept. of Health Hospitals at Boston.
All ceremonies will be held be-
tween May 4 and June 1.

to shift the burden from the taxpay-
ers. He said the issue of spiraling
property taxes was the story of the
elections.
"(Residents) are up in arms,"
Copi said. "We need to find more
ways to raise money without raising
taxes.",

LIBEL
Continued from Page 1
Rielly and Sciarotta, LSA repre-
sentatives and members of the Con-
servative Coalition, have been col-
lecting student signatures and con-
tacting administration officials for

several weeks, in an effort to reform
the University's meal credit policies.
"Corey can do all he wants, but
it's a joke," said Rielly. "We're out
there working, and obviously the
Action Party wants to squelch it be-
cause they know that we're doing the
things that are good."

Nuts and Bolts
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Calvin and Hobbes

by Judd Winick
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by Bill Watterson

IN BIEFa
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
British officials foil Iraqi
weapons smuggling attempt
LONDON - Customs officials said yesterday they foiled an attempt
to supply Iraq with 40 American-made devices for triggering nuclear
weapons, and they arrested five people after an 18-month investigation by
U.S. and British authorities.
The probe climaxed in a freight shed at London's Heathrow Airport as
an attempt was made to put the devices - which may have been dummies
- aboard an Iraqi Airways flight to Baghdad, British customs officials
said.
Of those arrested in and around London, one was an Iraqi national who
was immediately served with a deportation order, authorities said.
Customs officials in London, speaking on condition of anonymity;
said the devices were capacitors, electrical components of the detonation
chain of a nuclear bomb.
Defense experts said it demonstrates Iraq's determination to become a
nuclear power, even at the risk of being caught violating Western bans o
the export of strategic high technology.
Arab group says Levin s
views biased by PAC money
WASHINGTON - Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., is one of Israel's top
supporters in Congress because he receives generous campaign donations
from pro-Israel groups, an Arab-American organizauon charged yesterday.
A spokesman for Levin denied the allegation, and said Levin bases his
positions on what he thinks is right and is not influenced by contribu-
tions.
The Arab American Institute issued a report that analyzed senators'
votes and other actions on Middle East issues. It said the 15 senators with
the most consistently pro-Israel record, including Levin, averaged more
than $102,000 in donations from pro-Israel political action committees in
the previous election cycle.
Levin received $178,688 from pro-Israel PACs for his 1984 re-election,
campaign, the report said. Common Cause, the public affairs group, re
ported this month that pro-Israel groups gave Levin $177,688 between
1983 and 1988. Levin is seeking a third term this year.
Missionary shot in Lebanon
RASHAYA FOUKHAR, Lebanon -- Extremist groups claimed re-
sponsibility yesterday for the slaying of an American missionary who was
shot to death in his south Lebanon home by masked intruders who burst
in as he prayed with his family.
The groups accused the victim, William Robinson, of trying to estab-
lish an Israeli settlement in south Lebanon, a predominantly Shiite
Moslem area. The Israeli government and Robinson's relatives in his
home state of Massachusetts denied it.
Israeli troops scoured their self-proclaimed security zone in south Le
banon for the killers, who entered Robinson's home in Rashaya Foukhar
on Tuesday night. The village of 4,000 is inside the security zone, about
eight miles northeast of Israel's border.
Lebanese security sources reported that the Israelis and their militia al-
lies raided houses and arrested an undisclosed number of people.
Rival Zulu factions clash in
S. African territoral dispute
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Rival Zulu factions battled with
guns, clubs and knives yesterday in Natal province, setting scores of
homes on fire and forcing hundreds of villagers to flee into the country-
side.
Soldiers and police patrolled Natal in an effort to quell the violence,
which broke out Tuesday and has killed at least two people.
Police reported two deaths and 25 injuries since Tuesday but expected
the figures would rise. Local reporters, who did not want to be named,
said up to 14 people had been killed.
Army units and extra police were deployed after some 2,000 Zulus
supporting the Inkatha party went on rampage with guns and knives
against supporters of the rival United Democratic Front. Observers and
police say the violence was sparked by the stoning of Inkatha buses that
drove through UDF areas after a rally Sunday.
Senate cuts property taxes
LANSING - The Michigan Senate upped the property tax relief ante
yesterday by overwhelmingly passing Republican-sponsored legislation to
cut taxes by $667 million this year.
The legislation would reduce property assessments for school operating
taxes from the current 50 percent of cash value to 40 percent by 1992.
The state would make up the money lost to school districts.
People more than 65 years old would not have to pay any property

taxes for school operations.
The Senate rejected Democratic attempts to amend the package so the
wealthy would pay a larger burden of property taxes, and Republicans re-
fused to spell out how the tax relief would be funded.
The legislation, which would provide about 60 percent of its tax relief
for homeowners and 40 percent for businesses, passed in five bills on
votes of 38-0 and 37-0.
They now go to the House, which already has passed Blanchard's pro-
gram to tie the yearly increase in property tax assessments to inflation.

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(W 1 990 Unversal Press Syndcte

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THE MISSION U.K. .
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Edits in Chief Noah ine aAssociat Sports Editors Steve Cohen, Andy Gottesman,
Managig Editr KritineDavondeHyman,.,Eric Lemont,
News Editors Karen Akertot, Marion Davis, Dav icd Tyom n
Minion Page Editor Da dGuen, Va Songwe Ar Editors Alyssa Katz, Krisin Paln
BoiniksPCgeravidnSiwart
Asociate Edits I. Matthew Miler, Laura Sankey Boolm Jan lk. PBrn dad
Weekend Editors FMmiJguel Crutzwrd
KevinWsn Music Forrest Green III
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List Editor Todd Dale
News: Ger Alumit, Josephine Balenger, Joana Broder, Diane Cook, Heather Fee. Juie Foser, Cathy Fugate, lan Holman, Mark
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Vance, Elisabeth Weinstein, Donna Woodwell
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Sports: Adam Benson, Eric Berkman, Michael Bess, Andy Brown, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Jen Durst, Ridard Eisen, Jared
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Photo: Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Julie Hdimnan, Jonathan Liss, Josh Moore, Samantha Sanders, Kenneth Smdler, Steven
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Weekend: Phil Cohen, Rob Earle, Donaladipado, Alex Gordon, IanaTrachtman, Fred Zinm.
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