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March 27, 1990 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-27

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ARTS
Tuesday, March 27, 1990

The Michigan Daily
Hoboken 's
by Kristin Palm

Tiny Lights glow

W HEN it comes to defining the
sound of Hoboken, NJ's Tiny Lights
it is best to keep a few simple rules
in mind.
First of all, don't believe the
hype. Critics rave about this band -
for this they should be commended
- but they do it for all the wrong
reasons bringing us to guideline #2:
sticks and stones... This band has
been grouped into every category un-
der the sun. Popular tags include
metal-edged, psychedelic and art
rock. Art rock may be the most
harmful label since it elicits images
*of Depeche Mode and that is not
what this band sounds like.
Another adage to remember with
this band: if it ain't broke, don't fix
it. Granted, Tiny Lights' repertoire
borrows from every innovative mu-
sical godparent around, but they get
away with it because they do it dif-
ferently and they do it well. One
unique feature of this band is their
use of various string instruments,
primarily cello and violin, which
adds to their ethereal aura. What's
wonderful is that, despite the inclu-
sion of classical tools, the band still
manages to succesfully borrow from
rockers such as Bowie, T. Rex, Janis

Tiny Lights, the pride and joy of New Jersey, are bringing their unique, avantly artsy, string-driven sound to the
nation. They're a little more rocky than Kronos.

Joplin, Patti Smith and even a
(somewhat) mellowed out Funk-
adel ic.
Besides being used for jamming
purposes, the members of the string
family lend to Tiny Lights' haunting
sound, as do vocalist Donna

Croughn's floating, swirling musi-
cal narratives, which are sometimes
allowed to drift into blissful obliv-
ion and are at other times grounded
by John Hamilton's soulful har-
monies. Hamilton also deserves the
prize for Most Versatile Performer as

the brains and brawn behind the ever-
changing guitar overtones which
move from country to folk to '70s
hard rock to full o' funk and feedback
and right back again in an altered,
updated form.
See LIGHTS, page 8

Page 7
IN rciew
...continued
Ulmer gives a bloody good show
Decked out in his finest Afro-Lunar-Cowboy regalia, James "Blood"
Ulmer gave two relentless performances at the Ark Friday night. His guitar
work ranged from precise pointilism to blazing abstract expressionism as
the crowd cheered him on to increasingly impressive sonic achievements.
Occasionally mumbling reggae and blues incantations into the
microphone, Ulmer proved what everybody already knew - that lie's
much more of a guitarist than a vocalist. As far as coming up with a label
for what he does, you could throw about terms like "free-jazz," "cosmic
blues" and "new Hendrix," but the real power of this trio's performance
came about through the audience's laying aside of left-brained
categorization and swan diving into the creative process right alongside the
bandleader.
No hog, Ulmer's playing allowed for equal contributions frond his
rhythm section. A rough approximation could be made to Jimi Hendrix's
first trio. In that outfit, bassist Noel Redding rooted it all down, keeping
time while Hendrix and drummer Mitch Mitchell battled out the noisy
leads. Friday night, Amin Ali provided the relatively reliable bottom for
Ulmer and drummer Calvin Weston's pyrotechnics. Weston, the only
rhythmatist I've ever seen who drummed and chewed gum at the same
time, had the stage all to himself for a brutal, athletic, 10-nminute drum
solo that would have snapped Neil Peart's forearms in two. It alone, as
they say, was worth the price of admission.
--Mark Swartz
Whorehouse doesn't get the hang of it
The title of the show was, in this case, a misnomer. Although calling
it theworst little whorehouse in Texas would be too severe, the show
might have been described as a combination of Jane Fonda's workout tape
and a junior prom (which it specifically claimed it was not). It was
interesting to see a show that managed to demonstrate that Thc Best Little
Whorehouse In Texas is an inherently good, funny musical and yet, when
staged, can become amazingly amateurish and sloppy.
MUSKET's production of Best Little Whorehouse had its entertaining
moments but they flew by quickly, returning to the dragging pace set at
the beginning of the first act. This sluggishness was largely dtie to the
lack of continuity and depth given to the characters. Granted, this was a
musical and not Chekhov or Ibsen, but several relationships could have
been explored more.
The choreography was elementary and sloppy, with the exception of a
two-scene reprieve by the Texas Aggie cheerleaders and the Aggie football
team. In this scene, the state senator treats the lucky Aggies to a night at
the whorehouse as a reward for winning a game. The staging of the
football game, the scene with Angelettes and the ensuing "Aggie Song"
were well done and very funny, but the rest of the singing and dancing
numbers seemed very unrehcarsed.
This show would have been a good performance for high school
students, but one might reasonably expect more than sophomoric talent
from MUSKET. There were a few isolated points of light. The voice of
Jennifer Perry as Miss Mona was beautiful to hear, although her acting
was weak. It frequently seemed that she was the only one onstage singing
- even when she was not singing one of her lovely solos.
The impression with which I was left was that MUSKET should have
postponed this weekend's performance for two or three weeks and
See R EVIEW, page8

Above The Law
Murder Rap/Another Execu-
tion 12"
Ruthless Records
This flawlessly produced single
will undoubtedly prompt reactions
such as:
"Eazy-E is my mutha- boy!
He's gettin' paid out!!"
"They're at it again, do you be-
lieve this??"
"That Eazy is a short little twerp,
ain't he??"
New kids on the block 187 and
KMG are neither of them as dynamic
as their predecessor The DOC, but
something tells me that they've got
a lot more to say; only time will
tell. Bass voomphs pound through
the 'speakers like huge sledgeham-
mers. Sirens from the Ironside TV

show intrude noisily and twin sam-
ples of PE bounce off the backbeat.
Envision 10,000 brothers swinging
left and right: this is the sound of
"hype" in a nutshell - anarchic.
Buckwild. Insane. The beat from
Funkadelic's "Good Ole Music,"
which later became the beat for the
Jungle Brothers' "Jimbrowski," and
then for "The DOC and the Doctor,"
has been slowed down and filled out
to funk with your mind a little.
"Murder Rap" depends on the
noize to keep you groovin', while
the rapper on "Execution" reminds
me of KRS circa Criminal Minded,
more than anything. This is the
Compton posse's poisoned rose,
their total absence of logic or moral-
ity; are we supposed to cheer or
tremble when a gunshot rings out?
Dr. Dre's got the drop (pardon the

pun) on his competition; not only is
his original music hittin', but his
samples remain utterly inexplicable.
Nice comeback.
-Forrest Green III
Nat "King" Cole
The King Cole Trio
Echo Jazz
As I watched the widow of
Nathaniel Adams Coles receive her
husband's posthumously awarded
lifetime achievement Grammy, I
couldn't help but smile at this
recognition which was tooo long in
coming. What a talented man Nat
"King" Cole was! Then I remem-
bered that my admiration for Cole
extended to a side of him about
which few people know. Certainly
the award was based mainly on the
adulation he received as a pop star.

His velvet-smooth vocals on hits
such as "Unforgettable," "Nature
Boy," "Mona Lisa" and "The
Christmas Song" captured the hearts
of a worldwide audience. But what of
the Nat "King" Cole before stardom?
What of Cole the brilliant jazz pi-
anist who influenced other greats of
the instrument such as Oscar Peter-
son and Bill Evans?
Long before people were swoon-
ing to his voice cushioned by a mul-
titude of strings, Nat was dazzling
jazz lovers with his piano work.
Most of the records he made during
this portion of his career were done
within a trio setting: Cole on piano,
Oscar Moore or Irving Ashby on
guitar and Wesley Prince or Johnny
Miller on bass. All of these men
were excellent musicians and it is
See RECORDS, page 8
PERSONAL
* * ATTENTION: Supreme Course Tran-
scripts, the LS&A lecture notetaking service,
has the following notes avail. at Alpha-
graphics Printshops at 715 N. Univ.: Anihro
1 B o 100, Bio 224, Rio 325, Class Arch
222, Comm 103, Econ 201, Econ 202, Econ
396, Econ 401, Geol 100 Geol 101, Geol
107, Geol 115, Geol 125, Iist 110, Hist 160,
Hist 161, Hist 333, Hist 366, Hist Art 272,
Physics 125, Physics 126, Physics 140,
Physics 240, Physiol 101, Poli Sci 140, Poli
Sci 353, Poli Sci 396, Psych 170, Psych 171
Psych 331, Soc 467, Soc 468. Call63-681
for info.
ADOPTION IF YOU'RE PREGNANT &
looking for a loving stable home for your
baby. Legal agency involved. Call collect
anytime, 1-517-394-3338.
DOUG - Future President's shouldn't smoke
but I understand why you did late Sat. nitel
Good luck on Econ! Love - Kim.
Feel fresh with fresh smelling soaps and
other stuff from the Village Apothecary.
RESERVE YOUR PASSOVER/Seder dinner
now, Chabad House - warmth, joy. 995-3276.
STRESSED?? Try a therapeutic massage!!
Debra K Rosek. CRT 663-7547.

CLASSIFIED

ADS

HELP WANTED

CRUISE SHIP JOBS, wait-
ers/waitresses/chefs., $15,000 - 46,000 annu-
ally. Call 612-330-3985, ext.. 10 for more
info.
DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT takes to run your
own business this summer? Student painters
needs energetic college students to manage
franchises across Michigan. Earn an average
of $7500 and possibly earn internship credits.
Call Jeff at 1-800-543-3792.
EARN $300 to $500 / wk. by reading books
at home. Call 615-473-7440 Ext. B587.
EARN $9/HR: TA's grads and seniors
'needed as notetakers for university lecture
notetaking service. Call Jeff at Supreme
Course Transcripts 996-2386.
EQUIPMENT MANAGERS NEEDED-
Outdoor Recreation Rental Center. Dept. of
Rec. Sports. May thru August. $4.60/r. If
interested call763-4560.
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTORiS
WANTED. Part-time. Must be great with
children. Previous gymnastics experience
necessary. Call Gym America at 971-1667.
LOOKING FOR HOUSE MOTHER
for a sorority of 25 girls for Fall/Winter
1990-91. Female graduate student, past asso-
ciation with Greek organization preferred.
Room and board included. Minimal responsi-
abilities. Call Kathy: 971-0202.
'NEED A SUMMER JOB? Complete job
listings available in all areas of Florida. Call
"407-347-1490.
ORGANIZER WANTED- the Graduate Em-
ployees Organization (GEO) seeks to hire an
organizer to organize & lead shop
rtmental) meetings, attend Steering
4omittee & Membership mtgs., educate
membership on GEO contract & history, &
-recruit stewards & leaders. Position requires
communication & organizational skills &
godworking knowledge of U-M & p rob-
lems faced by raduate students. Grad stu-
,dent p referred. 'Pay will be .40 fraction &
candidacy tuition for Spr. or Summer '90 to
winter '91. Call GEO at 995-0221.
OVERSEAS JOBS. $900-2000/mo. Summer,
r. round. All countries all fields. Free info.
, Write UC, PO Box 52-M101, Corona Del
Mar, CA 92625.
:.PART TIME BABYSITTING afternoons be-
ginning April 30. One child 6-mos old. Some
experience required. Canton 459-3262.
SEMEN DONORS NEEDED for a well es-
tablished infertility clinic. If you are a male
between 21-40 years of age and a graduate
student or a professional 5'10" or taller we
need you. Donors are aia $50 dollars per ac-
ceptable specimen. or further information,
please call 434-4766.
SITTER FOR TODDLER May-Aug.: Weds.
9-3 & Fri. 8-1; own car 65- 4719.
STUCCHI'S- Needs responsible students to
work evenings & lunch shifts at Washtenaw
Ave. location (need vehicle). Apply at
Washtenaw Ave. location.
THE MICHIGAN THEATRE.

GOING PLACES
$118 ANYWHERE IN THE USA ON
NORTHWEST airlines! Bring your NWA
voucher and AMEX card. Call EGENCY
TRAVEL, 665-6122, ask for Ann or David.
$50 OFF any North West Airlines flights. Fly
before Apr. 6. Call Dave 930-9788
CRUISE THROUGH THE SOVIET UNION
this sprin or summer. Program for interac-
tion with Soviets. Low prce. For more info,
call Rachelle at 665-9436.
DO THE WILD THING AT ELLIS LAKE
RESORT. Special April rates include cozy
cabin lodging, boats canoes, and OUT-
DOOR HOTTUB. $8-58 night. 10 min-
utes from Traverse City. 616-276-9502.
EUROPE SPECIALS: Amsterdam fr.
$449;Frankfurt fr. $449; Glasgow fr. $469-
London fr. $379; Paris fr. $469. Intemational
Student/Faculty cards $10. Eurail Flexipass
fr. $198. REGENCY TRAVEL 665-6122.
Ask for Dan or Deb.
FOR YOUR LOWEST OVERSEAS AIR-
FARES ask for Student Travel Network,
800-36$-1929.
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS SUM-
MER? Jet there form DTIT, ORD, or CLE for
no more than $229, or from the East Coast
for no more than $160 with AIRHITCH (r)
(as reported in NY Times, Let's Go! & Con-
sumer Reports.) For info: AIRHITCH (r)
212-864-2000.
ORIENT SPECIALS: Bangkok fr. $967.
Hong Kong fr. $887; Osaka fr. $919; Seoul
fr. $865-Sin a re fr. $999; Taipei fr. $845.
REGENCY TRAVEL 665-6122. Ask for
Dan or Deb.
STUDENT TRAVEL BREAKS at STAMOS
TRAVEL
For best European/Greece airfares. We're at
Kerrytown Mall. Call us *663-4400.
MISCELLANEOUS
CASH FOR BASEBALL football, hockey,
and basketball cards. 538- 589.
MUSICAL MDSE,
STEREOS, ETC.
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO 302 E.
Liberty. 665-8001. Repairs, authorized by
Gibson Guild. Martin Yamaha Alvarez.
ROOMMATES
ABOUT 1 BLOCK from UM. Tower Plaza,
female to share for Fall/Winter. 482-1908.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
a bdrm. in 2 bdrm. apt. $230/mo. Nonsmoker.
Fall/Winter 90-1. 668-8905.
GREEK MALE doesn't want to live in frat
house. Seeks single with 4 or 5party-minded
guys or girls. Ca1 Dave 761 -8794 anytime.
LOVE A LIFE OF LUXURY? Share fully
rendered condo in Tower Plaza. $600/mo.
Avail mid-May. Fem. pref. Nicole 485-8931.
MALE RMTE to share beautiful 2 bdrm. apt.

FOR SALE
2 MICROSCOPES. Professional quality.
B&L Bi-ocular w/ oil emersion. Mech. stage.
$325. Olympus w/ oil emersion. Both ad-
justable lights. $200. Call Dr. Mutter. 553-
6160.
ANSWERING MACHINES, unopened,
wholesale, Call Eric 662-6892.
DENTAL ENGINE chrome w/ handpiece.
$225. Call Dr. Mutter. 553-6160.
HONDA ELITE 250/500 mi. White/Digital
display/ Great cond. Highway legal! Asking
$1800%bo...Cal994-102.l
AUTOMOTIVE
MERC. LYNX GS '87, only 20,000 miles,
great condition, one owner, am/fm automatic,
more! $4995/best, 769-2763.

GREEK GAB
GREEK SOCIAL CHAIRS:
Take advantage of our spring specials!
Great Formal ideas plus lots more!
The Cloz Co. Call Jon 994-4045.
GREEK WEEK KICKOFF!
Alpha Omicrom Pi Dance Contest
DJ- WIQB
Thursday, March 29- Nectarine Ballroom
Doors open 6:00 pm. Tickets $4.
LOST & FOUND
FOUND- 3/22, SILVER BEAD BRACELET
b the new chemistry building. Call 996-
8838. Describe.
LOST 3/21 KEYS on plain ring (fishbowl?).
761-2486 after 11 pm. Reward!
LOST: GOLD WATCH. Between East Quad
and Angell Hall. Tremendous sentimental
value. Reward. No questions asked. Call Ali-

SITUATIONS WANTED
HARVARD MBA STUDENT & spouse
need housesitting situation or house to sublet
June through August. References. 764-0550
(D) 995-2494, Nancy.

ADVERTISER PHONE
ADDRESS
STUDENT I.D. NUMBER INVOICE
We Can Help DEADLINE: MARCH 28
You Can Help Publication: April 5
TO PLACE A SUMMER SUBLET AD:
" Mail in or bring in person * Help the Homeless:
to the Student Publications For every 3 cans of
Building, 420 Maynard, Ann food you bring in,
Arbor, MI 46109 receive $1 off the
SCash,= money orders, orbjjp price of your ad
Low checks only! (Limit 9 cans, $3)
* No refunds -AA emstf s &ra ArMr m cr

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