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March 23, 1990 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-23

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily
Baltimore, Stern
defy convention
by Sherrill L. Bennett
SOME compositions get played more often than others. Some to the
point where they become standard. For a violinist, it's the Mendelssohn
Violin Concerto, for a flutist, it's Mozart's G major Concerto, and there's
not a symphony orchestra on the planet that hasn't played Beethoven's
famous Symphony No. 5. That's why it's so famous.
But Sunday evening at Hill Auditorium, there will be no Mendelssohn,
no Mozart, and no Beethoven. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, with
talented conductor David Zinman, will play an exciting, colorful concert of
non-standards, including Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5 in B-flat, Op.100,
Lesfrancjuges overture by Berlioz, AND, gifted soloist Isaac Stern will
perform Dutilleux's Violin Concerto, L'Arbre des songes (The Tree of
Dreams).
The Prokofiev is a suspenseful, dramatic work in four movements. It
alternates between slow and mysterious, and fast and delirious. There are a
few bright moments, but something is always lurking just around the
corner. Symphony No. 5 is complemented by the Berlioz Overture, another
dramatic work spiced with Berlioz's own brand of thrilling orchestration
and episodic melody.
Completing this program is Dutilleux's concerto, the most recent
work. He composed the work in 1985 especially for Isaac Stern, who is at
home with such a demanding piece. This time Stern returns to the Ann
Arbor stage with newcomer, conductor David Zinman. Zinman was
recently recognized with a Grammy for a recording made with Yo-Yo Ma
and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Stern and Zinman are frequent
collaborators, and team up with the BSO for what the Washington Post
calls "the most moving, noble playing heard in a long, long time."
See STERN, page 9

Friday, March 23, 1990

Page 8

No ordinary

Joe

Renegade Soundwave
Soundclash
Enigma Records
If you've been to the Nectarine
on a Thursday night anytime in the
last year or two, you've undoubtedly
heard Renegade Soundwave's
"Cocaine Sex." Released in 1988 on
RSW's eponymous three-song de-
but, the song quickly became a
Thursday night staple and generally
got overplayed in dance clubs every-
where. So along comes 1989 with
RSW's first full-length release,
Soundclash. The record picks up
where the last one left off and solidly
establishes RSW as more than just a
one-hit wonder in the fickle world of
dance music.
In most of the songs, RSW
sticks to its basic medium-tempo
bass-heavy grooves without adding
too much unnecessary ornamenta-
tion. The songs are potent slow-burn
percussive tunes that seep into one's
consciousness and can easily begin
moving feet around. (Unless you're
really careful. Or deaf.) There are ex-
ceptions, such as the excellent fre-
netic "Biting My Nails" (which also
appeared on the first record and
should have been a bigger hit than
"Cocaine Sex") and the two CD-only
instrumentals, which pick up the
tempo without sacrificing the
groove.
Except for a wacky cover of The
English Beat's "Can't Get Used To
Losing You," it seems that the
primary focus is on dancing. How-
ever, there are two footnotes to keep
in mind here. First, the songwriting
does not suffer because of this;
things stay pretty original and inven-
tive, with the possible exception of
some of the lyrics. Second, calling
See RECORDS, page 9

Guitarist Satriani to blaze and amaze tonight

by Scott Kirkwood
He's a juke box hero
Got stars in his eyes.
le's a juke box hero.
Just one guitar...
He'll come alive tonight
-Foreigner, "Juke Box Hero" 1981
YOU'LL find Joe Satriani's al-
bums right behind Santana's on the
record shelves, but on the list of gui-

tar greats you just might find Satri-
ani's name ahead of Carlos Santana,
Jeff Beck, even Jimmy Page, and
that Van Halen fella is no doubt
looming on the horizon. Satriani's
1987 major label debut, Surfing
With The Alien, has sold over one
million copies worldwide and was
followed with the AOR favorite
"Crush of Love" the very next year.
The current tour is in support of his
latest effort Flying in a Blue Dream,

which was recently certified gold and
has been near the top of the Bill-
board charts for the past few
months. This time around the single
"One Big Rush" has taken over the
airwaves with its quick-paced drum
beat racing against Satriani's six-
string.
This guitar virtuoso, a New York
native, has taught Metallica's Kirk
Hammett, as well as Steve Vai, one
of rock's most respected axe men,
who was formerly with David Lee
Roth and is currently performing
with Whitesnake. Simply put, Satri-
ani is a guitarist's guitarist. He's
consistently voted one of the best by
Guitar World and Guitar Playgr
magazines, not only for his tech-
nique but for the simple, striking
music that comes out of the ampli-
fier every time he performs. Lastly,
in mentioning his achievements it's
only fair to note that Satriani's my-
sic was featured on the soundtrack of
Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.
You can make whatever you want of
that...
The fact remains that Satriani has
accomplished a lot with just five
fingers and six strings. Flying show-
cases his many talents and features
the artist on bass, keyboards, percus-
sion, banjo, harmonica, even vocals.
And as far as Satriani's vocal ability
is concerned, well, let's just say he
can really play that guitar. "I Be-
lieve" is one of the exceptional vocal
selections that Satriani might per-
form this evening. More likely than
not we'll also see him perform a lit-
tle impfov at Hill as well. Who
knows, he might even find a way to
See SATRIANI, page 9

^ ore Y°Vou
e f * o#
Whol 00e y ae B
5 p Computer

Did you know that ace guitarist Joe Satriani is the fingers behind those
licks in BY/ and Ted's Excellent Adventure?

MARIETTA BEST
& COMPANY

UNION Sundays
March
4:00pm - 7:00pm
Tap Room
FREE JAZZ AND SPAGHETTI DINNER
Spaghetti Dinner with salad,
garlic bread sticks and
beverage $3.75

MSA Election Staff
Encourages You to
GET INVOLVED!
Research the Candidates
Know Party Platforms
Make Wise Decisions
Most of All ...
VOTE
MSA ELECTIONS
APRIL 4 & 5
Paid for by MSA Election Staff, 3909 Michigan Union

welcomes
ANN A BOR SINCE 1965
Anniversary ConCert
Saturday, April 21 7pm
Hill Auditorium
David Bromberg
Shawn Colvin
Duck's Breath Mystery Theater
Ferron
John Prine
Cris Williamson & Tret Fure
O.J. Anderson
THE NTX[
ANN ARBORNEWS
763-TKTS
Tickets available at Michigan Union Ticket Office and
all Ticketmaster outlets. A Major Events Presentation.

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