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January 16, 1990 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I-
Turnovers topple 'M'
during road swing
by Phil Green
Daily Basketball Writer
BLOOMINGTON --Turnovers kill.
This weekend the women's basketball team lost two tough road games,
Ohio State, 84-67, and, at Indiana, 60-58. The common denominator in
each game: turnovers.
In the first half versus Ohio State Friday, the Wolverines performed the
way they wanted to defensively. If they did not steal the ball, Michigan
forced the Buckeyes into bad shots and would pull down the defensive
rebound. Normally, this would lead to easy fastbreak baskets and a sizeable
lead. Friday afternoon, however, the expected results did not transpire.
Long outlet passes repeatedly bounded off of Wolverine fingertips,
wasting scoring opportunities. By halftime, the Wolverines had committed
twelve turnovers and instead of going into the lockerroom with a convincing
lead, they trailed, 34-33.
S In the second half, nine more turnovers contributed greatly to Ohio
State's dominance as the Buckeyes cruised to victory.
Michigan coach Bud VanDeWege emphasized that, "it was not
lackadaisical, just poor decisions."
Junior cp-captain Carol Szczechowski said about the turnovers: "We were
not using a fake, and were just trying to give a straight pass instead of a
bounce pass. We were just trying to force it."
Against the Hoosiers Sunday, the turnovers proved to be even more
deadly. Michigan committed 21 while causing only 12.
The Wolverine frontline, so successful early in the season, and Friday
against Ohio State (37 pts.), never became an integral part of Sunday's
offense, scoring only 17 pts. Interior passes were either intercepted before
they reached the front line players, or the ball would be instantly knocked
away by an ever-present Hoosier hand.
First-year center Trish Andrew was among those missing in action. In
Sunday's first half, she scored only two baskets while committing as many
turnovers, and never left the bench during the final 20 minutes.
Despite clutch shooting by Tempie Brown (23 pts.) and Szczechowski
(10 pts.), turnovers eventually finished Michigan off.
In the game's final minutes, the Wolverines came down the court twice
-nd turned the ball over each time. The second of these trips was extremely
nritical as Brown's pass to Joan Rieger was stolen by Zandrea Jefferies with
ten seconds left and Michigan trailing 60-58.
"To come down to your last two possessions and not even take a shot...I
can't tell you why (it happened,) it just did," VanDeWege said in
exasperation.
Indiana's coach Jim Izard, however, saw the final few plays from a
different perspective.
"The last two defensive possessions for us were very positive...we made
things happen and kept them from scoring," he said.
These turnovers turned out to be a fitting end to a frustrating weekend for
the Wolverines as they return home 9-5 overall and 1-3 in the conference.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, January 16,1990 - Page 11
Mike GillA
Reflecting on racism in
sports during MLK day
Yesterday, they came in droves and marched in Ann Arbor.
Yesterday, they celebrated throughout the nation a man with a vision
- a man with a vision of Black people and white people fulfilling a
dream.
Together.
To me, Martin Luther King Day is a feel-good day. You see the
masses, you watch their concern, and you see people of all colors, all
ages, all religions, walking in unity together.
It's a great feeling. There's a bond. You feel proud of America.
That's not true when you think of the 1960s. Mississippi Burning is a
powerful movie, set in that period. It's a horror to see the Ku Klux Klan
and supposedly upstanding citizens wreaking havoc on innocent and
impoverished people.
"Thank God we don't have that today," I thought. "Thank God for
change."
Then, look at sports.
Sports seems the epitome of what we want for society - no matter
what nationality, all push toward a common goal: winning.
What a difference from years before.
But then, certain other things run through my mind.
I recall the Red Wing Joey Kocur calling Tony McKegney a "nigger"
when he played for the St. Louis Blues.
I recall a Detroit Lions lineman doing the same to a Houston Oiler
this season.
I recall the statements made by Al Campanis, the man who brought
Jackie Robinson to the major leagues, about Blacks and their skills.
Maybe my image of sports as the ideal which society should strive for
- five, nine, or 11 men regardless of color - striving for a common
goal is idealistic. Maybe it's looking through rose-colored glasses.
Maybe sports is more the microcosm of life that we like to write
cliches about. Maybe the strive for a common goal is the surface, but
underneath there are big problems, which often are not seen. One can
become disenchanted when seeing athletics is not above these other ugly
facets of society.
I recall racist flyers on campus.
I recall reading in the newspapers about the Stuart escapade in Boston,
which sent a city on a witch-hunt after a pregnant woman was murdered.
The husband played off people's stereotypes and claimed it was of Black
man. Later, he killed himself when authorities tabbed him a suspect.
And then I recall last Saturday when my roommate came home with
his face bloodied. Someone yelled something incoherent from their car.
When he turned, a Black man jumped out of the car with a knife, soon had
him on the ground, and kicked him.
Why?
I then recall a high member in the Michigan Student Assembly telling
me a month or two ago that if everything that went on around here ever
went public, we would have race riots. Things were that bad.
What's the problem?
We say that Kocur, Campanis, and Jimmy the Greek are exceptions,
but look .around.
I am cynical. Maybe that's not the exception - maybe the word just
got out.
This is what life is like in this America. We don't use fire hoses,
dogs, or wretched brutality.
We do still have stereotypes and are filled with hate - and they often
remain hidden.
Despite these marches, how much have we really changed?

JUS. UAHt" 4tUdl>
Michigan guard Tempie Brown scored 23 points in a losing effort against
Indiana on Sunday, 60-58.

Men's basketball top 25
by the Associated Press

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Kansas (18-0)
Georgetown (13-0)
Oklahoma (12-0)
Missouri (15-1)
Syracuse (12-1)
MICHIGAN (11-2)
Illinois (12-1)
Duke (12-2)
UNLV (10-3)

10. Louisville (12-2)
11. Georgia Tech (11-1)
12. Arkansas (12-2)
13. LSU (10-2)
14. Indiana (12-2)
15. St. John's (14-3)
16. UCLA (11-2)
17. LaSalle (10-1)

18. Oregon St. (12-2)
19. N. Carolina St. (12-3)
20. Xavier, Ohio (11-1)
21. Loyola Marymount (11-3
22. Minnesota (10-3)
23. Arizona (9-3)
24. Purdue (11-2)
25. Alabama (12-3)

'M' wrestles
by Jeff Sheran
Daily Sports Writer
Last weekend featured the good,
the bad, and the unexpected for the
Michigan wrestling team as they
failed to place in the Virginia Duals
tournament. After defeating Ithaca
*0ollege, the Wolverines lost to de-
fending national champion Okla-
hbma State and North Carolina.
Michigan had little difficulty
with defending Division III National
Champion Ithaca in its first match,
cruising to a 31-9 victory. In the
match, 158-pounder Sam Amine
stored his second straight pin, a 5:05
fill over Mike Cronmiller. In the
process, Amine wrenched his neck,
'Wand shortly after the match ended, he
was taken to the hospital.
"Amine's injury was key," coach
Dale Bahr said. "He would have been
a big factor. He probably would have
won his next two matches." Doctors
found nothing serious about
Amine's injury, and he will wrestle
Saturday against Illinois.
.Filling in at 158 lbs. was James
Feldkamp, who forfeited his role as
the 142-pound starter because of dif-
ficulties cutting weight.
w Feldkamp was at a decided disad-
vantage, squaring off against oppo-
nents eight pounds heavier. Though
he lost all three matches at Virginia,
he sees his performance as positive.

i

rs undergo
"I figure if we forfeit at 158, the
other team gets six points. This
way, they only got three," Feldkamp
said. In his final match, the first-year
redshirt lost by a mere 4-0.
Claiming the 142 spot was
James Rawls, who, as a last-minute
substitution, notched a victory
against Lehigh. He lost the next
three matches however.
"I hadn't practiced in a while,"
Rawls said. "I was a little out of
shape, and I wasn't mentally pre-
pared." With more time to accustom
himself into the starting lineup,
Rawls feels he will easily make the
adjustment from being redshirted to
wrestling this season.
"It just pushes my plans up one
year," he said. "I'm not gonna blow
this opportunity."
Missing no opportunities for the

tumultuous weekend

Wolverines was 134-pound standout
Joey Gilbert. Gilbert, a true frosh,
was ranked ninth nationally headed
into the Lehigh meet. He faced Le-
high's captain, tenth-ranked John
Epperly, and 3:37 into the match,
Gilbert scored a pin.
Several days later, Gilbert met
top-ranked Chuck Barbee of Okla-
homa State. He emerged from the
contest with a 10-6 victory and sent
the message that he is no fluke.
"I've helped the lower weights.
We're real strong from 150 and up,
so hopefully I can keep helping us
early on," Gilbert said.
Another Wolverine who Bahr in-
cludes with Amine and Gilbert as be-
ing "the three guys getting the job
done" is Fritz Lehrke.
The 190-pound co-captain won
all four of his dual meet matches as

well, one decision coming over Ok-
lahoma State's Randy Coture.
Lehrke's 6-3 victory was the first
time he has beaten Coture in the
past two years, during which the two
have had numerous meetings.

..I

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