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March 20, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-20

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 20, 1990

Dress rehearsal
South West Africa Peoples Organization (SWAPO) supporters take part in dress rehearsals yesterday to prepare
ceremony marking the end of South African rule over Namibia.

for tonight's independence

COURSE
Continued from page 1
ing a course on diversity. "A lot of
faculty are interested in how they
(course criteria) apply in their field,"
ELECTIONS
Continued from page 1
Positions on the Board for Stu-
dent Publications are up for grabs on
the ballot as well, and several stu-
dents are campaigning for the under-
graduate and graduate positions.
LSA Sophomore Jesse Walker
founded the Abolitionist Party last
year, and is running again this year,
with ten other students interested
only in abolishing the assembly.
"We formed the Abolitionist
party last year in response to what
we saw as a growing autocratic atti-
tude on MSA," Walker explained.
"We think the assembly is becoming
a mirror image of much of what we
dislike in the University's adminis-
tration."
However, some students had less
ambitious reasons for seeking elec-
tion. LSA Sophomore Ranjan
Bagchi said he is running for MSA
because "it beats studying."
DIRECTORS
Continued from page 1
tion between past and present elec-
tion directors.
"In an election, one little prob-
lem can quickly become several very
big problems," Gebes said. "We've
got to get them before they get out
of hand."
TAX
Continued from page 1
"If there is hesitation on the part
of the university folk it will make it
all the more difficult. The bill re-
quires strong support to fight the to-
bacco lobby," Jondahl said.
Jondahl also expects strong op-
position from legislators fighting
any increase in taxes.

she said.
MSA President Aaron Williams
said he did not think most students
would oppose such a course. How-
ever, he questioned if students would
want to learn if they are "forced".

Minority Affairs Commission
member Delro Harris said, "If you
have a selection (of courses) then
you have a choice." He said a diver-
sity requirement is not much differ-
ent than current distribution and con-

centration requirements.
"I think that some of these
courses would educate people, and
I'm all in support of that." Harris
also said the course could improve
campus race relations.

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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Gorbachev warns Lithuania
MOSCOW -The Kremlin sternly warned the breakaway republic of
Lithuania, yesterday, not to put up its own customs posts, introduce its
own currency or take over Moscow-run factories without permission.
The nationally televised announcement was Mikhail Gorbachev's first
concrete step to counter Lithuania's March 13 declaration of independence.
The announcement did not say what would happen if Lithuania ignored
the orders.
Earlier yesterday, a Lithuanian delegation delivered a letter to the
Kremlin that promised Soviet interests in the republic would be given
"careful consideration."
Lithuanian activist Eduardas Potashinskas said he thought most
Lithuanians would take the government warning calmly.
Gorbachev and the Congress of People's deputies - the national par-
liament - declared the declaration of independence invalid last week, but
Kremlin leaders have ruled out the use of troops in Lithuania.
S&L funding falls short
WASHINGTON - President Bush's savings and loan bailout will fall
at least $30 billion and possibly as much as $162 billion short of the
amount needed to clean up the industry, a congressional report said yester-
day.
Legislation enacted in August provided $50 billion to close or sell
failed thrift associations through 1992. However, $48 billion of that will
be needed to cover losses at the 383 institutions seized by the government
through March 5, concluded a report submitted by Rep. Bruce Vento (D-
Minnesota).
Regulators expect the failure of an additional 225 to 295 S&Ls with
losses of a least $32 billion to $40 billion, according to the report.
Bailout officials, however, say there is enough money to last into next
year. If there's a shortfall after that, money intended to cover S&L losses
after 1992 could be reallocated to cover earlier failures, they say.
Senators accept PAC money
WASHINGTON - Political action committees (PACs) aligned with
financial institutions donated $344,133 to Sen. Donald Riegle's political
coffers from 1983 to 1988, the public affairs organization Common
Cause reported yesterday.
Meanwhile, organized labor and pro-Israel groups were Sen. Carl
Levin's top PAC contributors during the six-year period. Labor PACs
gave $281,995 and pro-Israel groups gave $177,688 to the Detroit Demo-
crat.
The study, based on financial reports that candidates are required to
submit periodically to the Federal Election Commission, covers the peri-
ods in which Levin and Riegle last sought re-election as well as years
when they were not campaigning.
Riegle took in $1,529,901 from PACs during the six-year period,
Common Cause said, including $1.2 million for his 1988 campaign.
PACs gave Levin $724,634 from 1983 through 1988 including $707,766
for the 1984 campaign.
New prison boot camp will
be developed in Chelsea
LANSING - A new prison boot camp will be developed at Chelsea
because it is cheaper to renovate the Cassidy Lake Technical Training
School than to build a new facility, officials say.
The new boot camp for about 360 young, first-time male felons will
be developed at Cassidy Lake by this fall, officials said Friday. Jackson
had been discussed as one site for the camp, which is expected to employ
about 100 people.
Donald Hengesh, director of Camp Sauble, the state's only existing
boot camp, said Cassidy Lake was chosen because it needs only minor
renovations. The camp will open as soon as the staff is trained and the
residents are moved out.
The 400 minimum-security inmates lodged at Cassidy Lake will be
moved this summer into other camps, including Michigan Parole Camp
near the State Prison of Southern Michigan at Jackson.
Ultrasound probes take first
3-D photos of heart arteries
NEW ORLEANS - Miniature ultrasound probes inserted into the
body are taking the first 3-D pictures of the heart's arteries, providing
highly detailed images of clogged and damaged vessels to help doctors fix
them, researchers report.
The pictures clearly show cracks and breaks in the artery wall, bulges
of fatty deposits and the layers of tissue that surround the blood vessel.

The development of three-dimensional images appears to be a signifi-
cant improvement on the still-experimental use of inside-the-body ultra-
sound probes to take pictures of ailing arteries.
That technique, which is only about 2 years old, has been used to
make two-dimensional pictures of cross sections of blood vessels. Even
with its limitations, doctors often describe this approach as "a fantastic
voyage" for its ability to give the illusion that they are traveling inside
blood vessels.
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 in-town and $39 out-of-town, for fall only $18.00 in-town and $22.00 out-of-town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
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Nuts and Bolts
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by Judd Winick
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by Bill Watterson
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Calvin and Hobbes

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EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Page Edior
Asociae Editors
Weekend Editors

Noah Fnkel
KristneLaLonde
Karen Akedof, Marion Davis,
Tara Guzen, Vera Songwe
David Schwartz
1. Matthew Mier, Laura Sankey
Miguel Cruz,
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez, David Lubliner
Todd Dale

Spots Editor
Associate Sports Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Music
Theater

Mike Gill
Steve Cohen, Ady Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont
Taylor Lincoln
Alyssa Katz, Krstin Palm~
Carolyn Po~or
Jon Binik, Brent Edwards
Forrest Green III
Jay Pekala

Photo Editors
List Editor

News: Josephine Ballenger, Joanna Broder, Diane Cook, Heather Fee, Jennifer Hirl, Ian Holman, Mark Katz, Christine Kloostra, Ruth
Utmann, Emily Miller, Josh Mitnick, Dan Poux, Amy Ouick, GI Renberg, Mike Sobel, Michael Sulivan Noele Vance, Elisabeth
Weinstein, Donna WoodweL.
pinion:Mark Buhan, Yael Citro, Ian Gray, Leslie Heilbrunn, Stephen Henderson, L Matthew Mller, Aaron Robinson, Tony Silber,
David Sood.
Sports: Eric Berkman, Michael Bess, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Jeni Durst, Richard Eisen, Jared Entin, Scott Erskine, Steve
Fraiberg PhilGreen,Lo" y Knapp, Albert tin, John Nyo, JiCry, Sarah Qsbumn, Matt Rennie, Jonathan Samnick, Ryan Schreiber, Jeff
Shoran, Peter Zellen, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Greg Baise, Sherril L Bennett, Mark Binelhi, Kenneth Chow, Lynne CoW Beth Cokuitt, Sharon Grimberg, Brian Jarvinen, Scott
Kirkwood, Mike Kuniavsky, Ami Mehta, Mke Molitor, Annette Petrusso, Jay Pinka, Antonio Roque, Ilyse Schanz, Wendy Shanker,
Peter Shapiro, Rona Sheramy, Mark Swartz, Justne Unain, Phiip Washington, Mark Webster, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zubed
Photo: Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Julie Heliman, Jonathan Liss, Josh Moore, Samantha Sanders, Kenneth Smeller, Steven
Szuch.

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