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March 19, 1990 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-19

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Page 8- The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 19, 1990

1;V

The University of Michigan Union March 19 to March 25, 1990

0

U .. ,
The Universit lub
Monday-Friday,
Lunch at the a
treat
Monday-Friday, 4-8
Happy Hour, where the huge TV
screen meets the tall cool one
Monday Evening
Reggae Ni 10:00:
D.J. an plays music
and a CDs
Tuesdag9
All new ap Night, 10:00:
D.J. Mark Feggins
Wednesday Evening
UAC Laughtrack, 9:30:
Comedian Tim Slagle
Thursday Even'
UAC Sound
Live music
Squadron and
Friday Evening
New Music Night, 10:00:
Return of an old favorite with
D.J. Tom onian
S ing
LI 0:
the umatoe and his
Powe (Look for the story
on this page to find out more!)
*****The University Club is a private
club for U-M students, faculty, staff,
alumni and their invited guests.
Only members of legal drinking age
may purchase alcohol. ID re-
quired.*****

Duke Tumatoe Brings
Blues to-Club
Duke Tumatoe knows the blues.
He learned them early and he
learned them well, growing up on
the south side of Chicago,
listening to the masters Muddy
Waters, Albert King, Bo Diddley
and the rest. He took those
blues and went beyond, blending
his own kind of blues with funk
and raunch 'n' roll to make a
hybrid puree that will keep you
moving.
Tumatoe has worked with the
best: his old mentors Waters,
King, Diddley as well as Little
Feat, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Willie
Dixon, John Hammond, The
Crusaders, Johnny Winter, and
Edgar Winter. This singer/
songwriter/guitarist has four
albums which have drawn rave
reviews from major media like
Guitar Player and the Chicago
Sun Times
His live crowd-slaying perform-
ances radiate gut-level honesty
and a genuine spirit rare in
contemporary music. He can
draw 10,000 fans to a Blues
Festival, and he can pack the
little clubs as well. He has been
touring the Midwest incessantly
for over a decade, bringing his
stylistic melting pot and inspired
stage act wherever he goes. He
plays the blues, and more.
"You hear blues roots in my
music, but I don't feel compelled
to stay strictly within that form.
On the other hand, if I had to try
to cross over for the rock crowd,
it wouldn't sound natural...so all I
can do is be me, that's the only
thing I'm satisfied being."
Hear for yourself when Duke
Tumatoe and his Power Trio
appear Saturday, March 24 at
10:00pm in the U-Club.
Satriani's Eloquent
Guitar Comes to Town
Like Johnny B. Goode, Joe
Satriani can play his guitar like
ringin' a bell, but he can also
make his ax speak with an
eloquence that can only be
described as poetic, painterly,
and cinematic, elevating his
virtuosity to the level of art. He
has a thorough background in
music theory and has taught
guitar almost as long as he h
played, training Steve Vai of
Whitesnake and Metallica's K
Hammett among others.
His 1987 album urfin with t
Alien is the highest charting ro
guitar instrumental album sinc
Jeff Beck's Blow by Blow in
1976. He is a guitar hero, but a
well-rounded, sincere, highly
intelligent one, and he ma
very special music.

Intern in Organization Development
Next fall, qualified student led r . :the opportunity to
strengthen their leadership ~pwledge through
training and practica "6Th t4 trganization Develop-
ment Center h a3 ization develop-
ment.
Student int i..................ersonal.and
'group comm "': :k ; d have the
opportunity to + Gt's ypresent
workshops for atk t organiza-
tions. In additio: ;' a tw ft q i1r their
work.
To get more informat n stop by the Student
Organization Developn tx202 Michigan Union or call 763-
5900. Applications are duB.;i ODC office by 5pm this Wednesday,
March 21.
"Not for Leaders Only" Workshops for Everyone!
The 1990 Winter Workshop Series comes just at the right moment.
Life seems to be on hold and you need something to give it some
focus. Take part in one (or more) of SODC's workshops. This week,
join in "Don't Stress, Be Well" from 7-9pm on Wednesday, March 21 in
2209 A & B Michigan Union. Every student knows that exams,
graduation, classes and just plain living can cause a great amount of
stress. Take a few hours off to find out how to manage these daily
stresses in your life and promote wellness.
To reserve your space, please call the SODC office at 763-5900 Mon-
day-Friday from 8-5. Reservations are requested.
The NIB Buffet is for You!
The special lunchtime buffet at NIB F ' r in the
North Ingalls Building happens ve rily $4.95 per
person, feast this week on Roast Pork ring and Gravy,
your choice of Mixed Vegetables or Mashed 4, and Assorted
Rolls with Butter. How much better that sounds tn peanut butter
and jelly...
Jazz Rules at the North
Campus Commons . SS . S
Enjoy the swinging, relaxing
sounds of jazz as you eat your
lunch at North Campus Com-
mons, this and every Wednes-
day. A U-M Music School
student jazz ensemble will ;r C c.!
perform in the atrium at noon, s.s
just as you get a chance for a o'~. s
short break. Buy your lunch
from the Commons or bring your
own, but be sure to be part of ;s.
this classy lunch hour.
How about Jazz at Night? The
rthcoast Jazz Ensemble will
pearing Thursday, March
the North Campus
ns Cafeteria at 8:00...for
ree! is group has toured r FAUKT
Europ d will now tour the C --r F ~S. u v
northe eaches of Ann Arbor.
For so tylish and swinging
sounds sure to come hear
this gr and before it takes off
again ore exotic locations.
P~usic FIIIs
eton
eek, Arts at Mid-day"
nts some very special
rams just for the lunchtime
udience. This week we will Y*an <
hear Midori Koga, a pianist from
the U-M School of Music,
reforming music of Mozart andT
She will appear on
arch 22 from 12:15 -
ourmet early
or U-Club,
ton Room on
th econd he Union for
thi ee conc

ish, d Ec is
n of sician the Turtle
st stun g g . How do you L 1r
nodern combining many -)EOR""
40 1 self is a mystical r nro c'
e stern half of the North T
c jazz piec to the quartet
Do-founder and composers
have been reaking new ground
n Quintet d currently with
Fusing odern jazz, bebop,
and t tieth-century classi-
wn cal landscape. All four
sts in their own right. --

Into the Streets!
As the weather gets w 4 the snow melts, life resumes and it's
time to get out of the e 'lfd into the community! As part of
S.E.R.V.E. Week '90, Pr .k.V.E. is sponsoring "Into the Streets,"
a day of service on SaturdayApril 7 from 10am-3pm. This event will
bring together volunteers with community residents and organiza-
tions in need.
There will be various projects available so that s ents, faculty, and
staff can put their time and talents to good us ePH4 activities
include repairing and painting buildings, h ,4j Monte Carlo
Day, taking a field trip with facility residents,' ing through a
carwash, and many, many more. This is a great ortunity to spend
a few hours with others interested in a fun-filled service-learning
experience.
Also, each project will need a site coordinator, someq e who will
make contact with the agency and the participa41 sure every-
thing will run smoothly on the big day. To re , exciting
day, stop by the S.E.R.V.E. office at 2211 Michig an. or call 936-
2437 by March 30. Sign up individually or as a gr .: everyone is
welcome!
NOTE: Volunteers with green thumbs are needed to help out April 3-9
at the Ann Arbor Flower and Garden at the U-M Matthei
Botanical Gardens. What a great ,? d some time in the
spring! Contact the S.E.R.V.E. office1' help.
Helping is a chain reaction: Pass it along!
Jerusalem Honored in Children's Art
More than 30,000 children from 40 countries submitted their work to a
competition honoring the 20th anniversary of the reunification of
Jerusalem. The prize-winning paintings by the twelve winners are
being displayed now on our campus. Sp3nsored by Arts and Pro-
gramming, the Institute of Faculty and Students on Israel, and the
Israeli Embassy in Washington, DC, this inspiring show will appear
from now to March 29th in the Art Lounge on the second floor of the
Michigan Union.

6

0

Ticket Office-
On sale now.......Open every day
763-TKTS
Thomas A
A bariton ics and
audiences a, concert,
and recital pe nces
Wednesday, March 21
8:00 - Rackham
Turtle Island String Quartet
Classical jazz translated with
eclectic excellence to the quartet
format
Thursda a 22
8:00 -
Joe Satr
His guitar s with an
eloquence that is poetic, pain-
terly, and cinematic
Saturday, March 24
8:00 - Hill Auditorium
Baltimore Symphony Orches-
tra
"The performance a lifetime,"
dazzling under ' baton
Sunday, Mar
8:00 - Hill Au
Aretha Franklin
"The Queen of Soul makes a
rare concert appearance
Saturday, March 31
8:00 - Hill Auditorium
Academy of St. Martins-in-the-
Fields
This r tring ensemble
pla ce and
exub
Sunda 1
8:00 - Hi uditorium
Tap R oom Jazz
Take a jazzy break from
studyingI.
Join us this Sunday 4 - 7pm for
free jazz with Marietta Best &
Company in the Tap Room on
the ground floor of the Michigan
Union, There will also be a
spaghetti supper available which
includes salad, garlic bread
sticks and your choice of
-beve rage for $3 .5

Joe Satriani will plE
Saturday, March 2
Hill Auditorium.
$18.50 at the Mij
Ticket Office, or
phone by callin*

Turtle Islan usic
Windham Hill has ML ined a
Island String Quart sane
define anl ensemble t
different music forms al
place: it is the Native Americ
American continent.
The group excels at tran
format, improvising -
David Balakrishnan
for years, as part o
Windham Hill's sup
bluegrass, Indian m
cism, Turtle Island see.
members of the group ar

As Strings Magazine put it, "On stage, the ensemble takes one step
further the message long ago proven by such greats as Stephane
Grappelle, Joe Venuti, Eddie South, and Svend Asmussen: strings can
swing." To hear them swing in person, be there when the group
appears on Thursday, March 22 at 8:00pm at Rackham Auditorium.
Tickets are $16, on sale now at the Michigan Union Ticket Office. To charge by
phone, call 763-TKTS.

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