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March 16, 1990 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-16

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Doctor speaks on S.A
African health issues,

The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 16, 1990 - Page 5
Pow Wow to honor-
Native Americans

by Gil Renberg
Daily Staff Reporter
South Africa's Black population
is exposed to tremendous health
risks, said Dr. Delano Meriwether, a
professor at Albion College, in a
speech yesterday at the University
Medical School.
Meriwether recently returned
from a six-year stay in South Africa,
where he worked in a hospital and
learned about life in the "homelands"
where millions of poor, Black South
Africans live.
The apartheid-created homelands,
which are similar to reservations, are
areas where Blacks are forced to live.
Homelands are "artificial creations of
the government" which should be
abolished, Meriwether told a crowd
of about 80 people. "The South
African government separates people
to keep them unequal."
Meriwether said the inequality
manifests itself in the perilous liv-
ing standards of the Blacks, who
often lack running water. He said the
inhabitants usually drink unclean and
contaminated water which has not
been boiled.
"There was every major illness
associated with poverty," Meriwether
said, noting that these conditions
perpetuate the spread of diseases,
many of which have been eradicated

in more developed parts of the world.
He said tuberculosis, for which he
immunized as many Blacks as pos-
sible, is very common.
Further compounding the prob-
lem, Meriwether said, is the lack of
food. The prescriptions he wrote for
his patients frequently were for
"food" rather than medicine.
Whites, on the other hand, re-
ceive excellent health care, said
Meriwether. Whereas South Africa
has seven medical schools for its
population of five million whites,
there is only one medical school for
the 35 million Blacks, he said.
Meriwether said the suffering is
not easily alleviated and little effort
is made to improve the situation by
international groups, such as
UNICEF and the Red Cross, which
are boycotting South Africa because
of the apartheid system. He said the
boycott hurts those it is meant to
help: "You don't punish the victim."
In an informal discussion after
his speech, Meriwether gave his
views on how to bring about the end
of apartheid. "We need to put effec-
tive pressure on the South African
government and not make fools of
ourselves."
He praised the intentions of those
who placed economic sanctions on
South Africa but claimed that these

by Geri Alumit
The 18th annual Pow Wow is
expected to draw over 5,000 specta-
tors to the University Sports Arena
this weekend. Adorning "Dance for
Mother Earth" as its theme, the Na-
tive American festive affair will
showcase traditional art work and
will present a celebration of dancing
and singing.
"We believe that Mother Earth is
the one binding factor among all the
different races and that by healing
our Mother and respecting her we
can all come to peace," said RC ju-
nior Melissa Lopez, a Navajo Indian
who is President of the Native
American Student Association.
Traders from across the United
States and Canada will exhibit au-
thentic Native American made mer-
chandise at the event. "This is a
wonderful chance to share with the
rest of the University our culture.
We don't just want people to read
about our culture but to experience it
also," said Lopez.
The event's festivities will
include three grand entries or Native
American dance competitions, two
taking place Saturday and the third
on Sunday. At least 13 to 14 drum

groups will perform at the Pow
Wow.
In addition to the Pow Wow, Ken
Funmaker, Sr., a Winnebago tribal
leader, and his daughter Lori Fun-
maker, will discuss their tribes ways
and demonstrate traditional dance
styles Friday night at the Stanley
House Lounge in Baits Hall.
"This Pow Wow tradition has
been part of our culture for hundreds
of years and we as students and
faculty show our dedication to our
heritage by hosting this event," said
Lopez.-
The The Pow Wow is sponsore4
by the University's Minority Stir
dent Services, the Native American
Student Association and Americans
Indians.
EAD
THEr
CIA.SJFIE 6{'

JENNIFR t DuuETiaiy
Dr. Meriwether addresses a crowd in the South Lecture Hall in the
Medical Science Building in an appearance sponsored by the Black
Medical Association and the Latin American/Native American Medical
Association.

measures had little effect on the
country's strong economy. Meri-
wether said South Africans laugh at

such U.S. actions and in his grade-
book these sanctions earned "a 'C'
for economics, 'A' for morals."

LYBIA

Continued from page 1
A previously unknown group of
Libyan dissidents, the Organization
of the Patriotic Wing of the Libyan

Army, claimed responsibility for the
blaze in a statement sent to West
Germany's ARD television network.
A journalist for JANA, reached
by telephone from Cairo, said he
was unsure whether there were casu-
alties in the fire but said the plant

was badly damaged.
"You may consider it has been
burned down," he said, speaking on
condition of anonymity.
White House press secretary Mar-

lin Fitzwater said damage was exten-
sive but the plant was still standing.
"Common sense would tell you it's
not functioning," he said. "We as-
sume it's not functioning."

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The Women's Studies
Program presents

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RACE AND GENDER:
REDEFINING THE
SOCIAL SCIENCES
A LECTURE BY
KING/CHAVEZ/PARKS VISITING PROFESSOR
BONNIE THORNTON DILL
Research Professor, Center for Research on Women,
Memphis State University
in conjunction with the awarding of the

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THIS WEEKEND,
THE PARTY'S
OFF-CAMPUS
a
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Pace yourself. This is clubs. Jaz
no ordinary party. For/3 Countless
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Or how about the city's Plus tax College Ra
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onvenient.
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MCGUIGAN ESSAY PRIZES
Public reception after the lecture
Monday, March 19, 1990
at 4:00 p.m.
Pendleton Room, Michigan Union

U

The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan
announces
THE TANNER LECTURE ON
HUMAN VALUES
1989-90
CAROL GILLIGAN
Graduate School of Education,
Harvard University
Author of In a Different Voice
JOINING THE RESISTANCE:
PSYCHOLOGY, POLITICS,
G7 RLS AND WOMEN
Friday, March 16
Rackham Auditorium
4:00 pm
SYMPOSIUM ON THE
TANNER LECTURE
CAROL GILLIGAN
MARY BRABECK
Counseling Psychology and Human Development Program
Boston College
JUDITH STACEY
Department of Sociology
University of California, Davis

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