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March 14, 1990 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-14

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.gg.e 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 15, 1990

Make-your-own harbor
2A group of curious sightseers stare at a stranded Soviet frigate which was blown onto the beach at Loenstrup on the Danish North Sea coast
juesday. Stormy winds caused the ship to break loose from the Polish tug that was pulling her.

WHEEL
Cdhtinued from page 1
0UGo for it. "The viewers like
thd person who says 'I'm gonna take
on more shot at the wheel, Pat."'
Debi Saitz and Carin Dubrowski,
L\A seniors, showed true dedication
to the ideals of the Wheel, leaving
the auditions for only 25 minutes to
take their Sociology 101 midterm.
"We called our TA last night to
ask if we could take it later, but he
didn't think it was a valid reason,"
Saitz said.
""We walked in and told the prof.
our situation. He gave us the test
ea4y - before ten after - and we
finished, essays and all, in 25 min-
utes," added Dubrowski. "We defi-
nitely passed. I'd say about a B."
. Nevertheless Saitz and
Dubrowski weren't selected.
"Winner Potok did not sacrifice a
midterm, but she did arrive at the
Union four hours early. to ensure
she would get into the auditions.
Wheel officials had announced that
only the first hundred students at the
door could audition.
t "It's not gonna sink in until to-
morrow," said Potok, adding that her
father looks like Pat Sajak.
Team-member Guffey said he
"Flipped out" when he was named to
the team. "I just came down here on
a whim and smiled a lot. My girl-
friend's gonna be pissed; I'm gonna
miss her graduation." But Guffey
*P hopeful that the show would be
lzative, "...dollar signs! Ku-chink,
khink."
Three of the team members will
compete in Los Angeles on May 5th
against teams from the University of
Washington in Seattle, Tulane and
N, orthwestern. The fourth student
will tape May 6th as a regular con-
testant on the show.
The round-robin "College Week"
tournament will air from May 21 to
5:and the team's winnings from
the final night's show will go to the
University.
UM News in
V _ 764-0552
A. 9

LOBBY
Continued from page 1
increased 44% since today's seniors
were freshman, and rate hikes like
these cannot continue."
Tuition hikes could harm minor-
ity enrollment, said Olave, listing
this as the reason for his participa-
tion in the program.
"As a representative of MAC, I
felt that tuition hikes would hit mi-

nority students particularly hard, be-
cause many are economically disad-
vantaged," he said. "I felt it was im-
portant to go directly to the powers
in Lansing, to represent the concerns
of minority students on this cam-
pus."
The delegates said Student Lob-
bying Day paved the road for future
communication with Lansing. The
delegation was invited back to Lans-
ing by Senator William Sederburg,

(R- Ingham), to testify before the
Senate Subcommittee on tuition
hikes on March 26.
"This is going to be an ongoing
thing. We're going to continue to
follow up and speak to members of
the legislature on tuition and a num-
ber of other education issues to make
our voice heard," said Holmes.
"Today, we just got our foot in the
door."
,6o .o Wahal a.ra/ .-iP Og

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Detroit suburbs initiate
mandaory trash recycling
UNDATED - Bins will join bags along streets in Dearborn and
Southfield by July 1, when those cities become among the first in
Michigan to adopt mandatory trash recycling programs.
The 18-gallon plastic bins will be set aside for glass, newspapers,
plastics and other recyclable materials. The traditional bags will hold
household trash bound for the state's rapidly filling and increasingly
costly landfills.
"Cities have to update their solid waste disposal plans, and they are
taking a closer look at mandatory recycling," Robert McClellon of Waste
Management Co., which will administer the Dearborn and Southfield re-
cycling programs, said yesterday.
"Hopefully this will lead to a greater awareness of environmental is-
sues," he said. "People could begin to do smarter shopping by buying re-
cyclable goods."
Schuette proposes death
penalty for terrorists
WASHINGTON - Michigan Rep. Bill Schuette's proposal to make
terrorist murders punishable by death would not impair U.S. efforts to ex-
tradite suspects from abroad, the Bush administration said yesterday.
Schuette, (R-Sanford), said Congress should not hesitate to allow capi-
tal punishment for terrorists - even if some countries use the policy as
an excuse to deny U.S. extradition requests.
If necessary, he said, the United States should send agents onto foreign
soil to apprehend the suspects.
"I think to do anything else is wrong," Schuette said in an interview.
"This madness has to stop. We have to put them on notice...leave Ameri-
cans alone or you're going to pay the price."
The question of impact on extradition was raised as the House Judi-
ciary Subcommittee on Crime conducted a hearing on Schuette's bill and
others that would impose the death penalty for a variety of federal crimes,
including drug trafficking and killing public officials.
Crews rescue $140m satellite
CAPE CANAVERAL - Ground crews yesterday rescued an uninsured
$140 million communications satellite after it failed to separate from its
launch rocket.
The satellite, however, orbited uselessly around Earth, launch officials
said.
After laboring for hours, crews sent computer commands to get the
balky satellite to separate from the giant Titan 3 rocket " before they re-
entered the Earth's atmosphere and were destroyed," said Martha DiSario,
an Intelsat spokesperson.
"This allowed the satellite to be placed in a safe low orbit," she said.
"We're looking at options, including a possible shuttle recovery."
The 5-ton satellite, nearly four stories tall with its antennas and solar
panels deployed, was boosted into orbit by Titan 3, the most powerful
U.S. commercial rocket.
Tornadoes devastate homes
UNDATED - Tornadoes ground across Texas yesterday in a renewed
assault of thunderstorms while crews were still clearing the wreckage of
more than 100 homes left by twisters that ripped six states.
Seventy-eight tornadoes were reported Tuesday, 25 in Kansas alone,
said Ed Fergurson, deputy director of the National Severe Storms Forecast
Center in Kansas City.
The worst of the the tornadoes damaged 75 to 100 homes in Hesston,
Kan., 35 miles north of Wichita, Ferguson said.
The two deaths occurred near Kansas towns of Burrton and Goessel,
near Hesston.
"It looks like it traveled a hundred miles at least and maybe a little
over that. It was on the ground for 2 1/2 hours. The average tornado is on
the ground only for a couple of miles," Ferguson.
Kansas Gov. Mike Hayden declared eight counties disaster areas.
EXTRAS
Students tell lies to have sex
BOSTON - Here's an insight that may fail to shock dedicated stu-
dents of the mating game: People often tell lies in order to have sex.
Honest.
Two California researchers reached that conclusion about dating behav-
ior after taking a survey of college students.
They say it's a point worth keeping in mind when trying to decide
whether potential sexual partners have ever done anything to put them-
selves at risk of AIDS.

In the survey,34 percent of male respondents and 10 percent of women
admitted they had "told a lie in order to have sex." Even more said they
would lie if a situation arose where it would be to their advantage.
The researchers noted that young people are advised to choose sexual
partners who are at low risk of infection with HIV, the AIDS virus.
"The implications of our findings are clear," they wrote in today's New
England Journal of Medicine. "Patients should be cautioned that safe-sex
strategies are always advisable, despite arguments to the contrary from
partners."
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
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Nuts and Bolts by Judd Winick
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069 -

EOITORAI STAFF:

Q-1. CAU.

LOA I-W

i
1

Editor in Chief .NoahRikel Sports EdIitorMrita
ng Ed Kristn onde Associate Spots Editors Slave Cohen, Ady Gottsman,
ManagiDaviditor Kristiic Lalond
News Editors Karen Akedo, Marion Davis, Ta Uiocin
Tara Gruzen, Vera Songwe Arts Editors Alyss aU KlnPh
Opinion Page Editor David Sdiwarlz Bongs rArs srKatzKrisin Palm
Issues Editor Laura Sankey Rim J on , Brent Edwads
Weekend Editors Miguel Cruz, RunFJ sGnB
KvnWoodson Music Forrest Green 111
Photo Editors Jose Juarez, David Lubiner Th ater Jay Pekala
List Editor ' Todd Dale
Weekend: Phil Cohen, Rob Earle, Donalaipacdo, Alex Gordon, NanaTrachtman, Fred Zim.
News: Josephine Ballenger, Joanna Broder, Diane Cook, Heather Fee, Jennifer Hirt, Ian Hofriian, Mark Katz, Christne K oosa, Ruth
Utman, Emily Miller, Josh Maick, Dan Poux, Amy Quick, 01 Renberg. Mike Sobel, Michael Sulivan NQ ie Vance, Elsabelh
Weinstein, Donna Woodwel.
Opinion: Mark Buchan, Yael Clto, Ian Gray, Leslie Heilbunn, Stephen Henderson, I Matthew ier, Aaron Robinson, Tony Sier,
David Sood.
Sports: Eric Berkman, Michael Bess, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Jeni Durst, Richard Esen.Jared Entin, Scott Erskine, Steve
Fraberg, Phi Green, Lory Knapp, Albert Un, John Niyo, Ji Cry, Sarah Osbu, Matt Rennie, Jonathan Samnrik, Ryan Schreiber, Jeff
Sheran, Peter Zellen, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Greg Baise, Sherril L Bennet, Mark Bineli, Kenneth Chow, Lyme Cohn, Beth Colguit Sharon Grimberg, Brian Jarvinen, Scott
Kirkwood, Mike Kuniavsky, Ami Mehta, Mike Moitor, Annette Petruss, Jay Pinka, Antonio Roque, Nyse Schanz, Wendy Shanker,
Peter Shapir, Rona Sheramy, Mark Swartz, Justine Unain, Philip Washington, Mark Webster, Kim Yaged, NabelZuberi.
Photo: Sarah Baker, Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Julie Hilman, Jonathan Liss, Josh Moore, Samantha Sanders, Kenneth Smller,
Steven Szuch.

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