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February 15, 1990 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-02-15

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 15, 1990 - Page 5

Urban
affairs is
I*topic of
0
seminar
by Eric Phillips
"Revitalizing America's Inner Ci-
ties: Strategies for the 1990s," will
be the focus of an Institute of Public
Policy conference analyzing methods
for the revitalization of America's
inner cities beginning this afternoon
at Rackham Amphitheatre.
Experts on urban affairs from
around the nation will participate in
the seminar, the keynote address will
-be from East St. Louis-Illinois,
Mayor Carl Officer.
Philadelphia Mayor, Wilson
Goode was originally scheduled to
1 deliver the keynote speech, but can-
celled his appearance last week due
to prior commitments.
"Mayor Wilson Goode was ex-
remely disappointed that he could
not attend, but was able to get Offi-
cer to replace him," said Kevin
White, media contact for the confer-
ence.
As mayor of East St. Louis, a
city notorious for its urban misery,
Officer has been widely blamed for
the town's woes. His tenure as
mayor began in 1979. The city is
now 98 percent black, has two-thirds
of its 45,000 residents on public as-
sistance, and suffers a multi-million
dollar debt.
"We wanted someone who had
managerial experience in a major
city, and who has had to face the
* problems like drugs, crime, and edu-
cation," White said of the keynote
speaker.
Officer's supporters point to his
attempts to develop the city's river-
front as one of the many ways he is
directing the city on the road to re-
covery. His critics, however, cite
his failure to apply for grants and re-
fusal to collect garbage as examples
of his extreme mismanagement.
Officer has enraged many ob-
servers with his flamboyant style.
He explained the city's garbage prob-
lem by saying, "Some people are
just dirty," in a Nightline interview.
The two-day conference, spon-
sored by the Neil Staebler Fund, will
end tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. with a
panel discussion.

Soviet reforms

k

by Elisabeth We

sch
3instein

While changes rack the Soviet
Union's political system, many
professors at the University are
continually reading in order to keep
their classes up to date.
a "It makes my course exciting. I
read the New York times everyday
before going to class, because what
was true yesterday may not be true
today," said Professor Ronald
Inglehart, who teaches an
introductory course in comparative
politics. "We are living through a
historic milestone."
Judith Kullberg, a political
science graduate student who teaches
a course in Soviet politics and
government, said, "It's hard to be a
Soviet scholar. They're forced to
keep up, and they feel like they're
always behind."
Despite the work, many
University professors said they are
excited to be teaching about the
Soviet Union during a time of such
great change.
Professor A.F.K. Organski
teaches Political Modernization in
the Developing World, but because
current events are not central to his
AP Photo course he said he has not had to
Mandela speaks change his syllabus much. He said
From his home in Soweto, South Africa, Nelson Mandela yesterday gave he does, however, use current events
his first interview to the. media after being freed Sunday. such as the Soviet reforms to
Gorbachev asks for more power

olars hop
illustrate points. new deve
Most professors contacted said have notf
Gorbachev's announcement last course. "
week, giving freedom to non- and polit
communist political parties to know the
organize, does not necessarily The S
destroy previous political theories. changes
Inglehart said the changes, "are not a positively
shock. They show deep rooted Many
trends." governm
"Things have been changing for a excuse
time," Organski said. weapons.
Sociology professor Barbara of the R
Anderson, who teaches a course on partly du
Soviet and Eastern European defense.
Esocieties, agreed with both Inglehart politician
and Organski that most political their star
theories are still valid. She said the reforms.

keep
ping
lopments in Eastern Europe
forced her to reorganize her
You can't understand social
ical changes if you do not
history."
oviet experts said the new
in the Soviet Union will
affect the United States.
of the professors said our
lent now has less of an
to continue building
Kullberg said the success
epublican Party has been
e to their stance on a strong
She said American
ns will have to reevaluate
nces in light to the Soviet

RIDE. THE WAVE ...
Use and Read
9bit Atbig= ailVClassifieds

MOSCOW (AP) - President
Mikhail Gorbachev appealed yester-
day for legislation backing for a
stronger presidency and said it was
vital to his reforms, but wary law-
makers refused to be stampeded into
setting a timetable.
Once again, the 542-member
Supreme Soviet proved itself a force
to be reckoned with in the new So-
viet political game, which under
Gorbachev has shifted more from
closed-door sessions of the Kremlin
leadership to elected government
bodies.
After a two-month break, the
fledgling Soviet legislature recon-
vened for the third time in its less
than one-year history. Lawmakers
approved a 22-item agenda to debate
bills designed to put flesh on the
skeleton of Gorbachev's economic
and social reforms, including legal-
ization of private property.

However, the Kremlin leader-
ship's proposal to call an emergency
session of the Supreme Soviet's par-
ent body, the Congress of People's
Deputies, to replace the office now
held by Gorbachev with a stronger
Western-style presidency met with
raucous debate.
"Unless democracy is strength-
ened and ensured by corresponding
mechanisms, democracy will perish
and we'll lose," Gorbachev told his
critics.
Otherwise, he said, the victors
will be forces who want to "tighten
the screws even tighter than they
were earlier."
More power for the presidency
would strengthen Gorbachev's gov-

ernment powers while further weak-
ening the Communist Party appara-
tus that he is trying to reform.
Gorbachev would have two pow-
erful instruments to implement his
program of "perestroika"- the party
apparatus and the reinforced machin-
ery of government.
Vice President Anatoly
Lukyanov, who flanked Gorbachev
beneath a gilded globe emblazoned
with the hammer and sickle, recom-
mended that lawmakers call the
Congress into session Feb. 27 to
fortify the presidency and make other
constitutional changes- including the
planned abandonment of the Com-
munist Party's legally guaranteed
right to govern.

NOTICE
A TEAM OF CONSULTANT-EVALUATORS FROM THE COMMISSION
ON INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION OF THE NORTH
CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS WILL BE
VISITING THE U-M FEBRUARY 19-21, 1990 AS PART OF THE
PROCESS TO RENEW THE UNIVERSITY'S ACCREDITATION.
THE TEAM WILL FOCUS ON THE UNIVERSITY'S STRATEGIC
PLANNING EFFORTS. OPEN MEETINGS--AT WHICH STUDENTS,
FACULTY AND STAFF CAN ADDRESS THE TEAM--HAVE BEEN
SCHEDULED AS FOLLOWS. NO RESERVATIONS ARE NECESSARY.

STUDENTS

4:00-5:00pm, FEBRUARY 19, 1990
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4:00-5:00pm, FEBRUARY 20, 1990
ANDERSON ROOM A, MICHIGAN UNION

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