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February 12, 1990 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-02-12

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The Michigan Daily- Monday, February 12,1990 - Page-3

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Arbor

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Above left: Ann Arbor residents Leslie Westin (with Spade) and Laura Adamson add the finishing touches to thier Shakey Jake ice sculpture. The sculpture received the People's Choice Award and placed secor
the Artists' Choice Award. Above right: Tom Bruker, Huron High School art teacher, knocks snow off his snow block before carving specific details. He and two of hic students worked on the sculpture.
Blocks of ice and snow come to lje

by Jennifer Hirl
Daily Staff Writer
Although the past weekend may
have had a touch of spring, ice
sculptures lining Main, Liberty and
State Streets created somewhat of a
winter wonderland.
The 31 sculptures, which were
part of the third annual Winterfest
sponsored by the Washtenaw Coun-
cil for the Arts, were built out of 10
feet tall blocks of ice and snow.
Each sculpture was judged for
style and creativity. A sculpture of
Ann Arbor legend Shakey Jake rep-
resented local personality. Another
sculpture demonstrated the impor-
tance of current events by depicting
people climbing through the Berlin
Wall, and a student sitting on top of
the world signified unity of educa-
tion throughout the world.
Three person teams carved each
piece of art. The teams consisted of
residents from Ann Arbor, Saginaw,
and Toronto. The winning team of
the competition will advance to the
national ice sculpting championship
to be held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
next January.
Not everyone participated in order
to reach the national championship.
Many carved the ice blocks solely
for fun.
Donna Haven, a University of
Michigan alumni, entered the com-

petition with a friend to build a Stars
Wars sculpture from a clay model
figure.
"I have no talent at all, but I
have a lot of enthusiasm," Haven
said.
Others, like Bill Doehring of
Saginaw, partake in ice sculpting
competitions throughout the coun-
try.
"My team takes ice sculpting se-
riously, but we have a lot of fun
too," Doehring said. "We don't re-
ally compete with others, but we
strive to build a fascinating shape."
Doehring and his team have par-
ticipated in the National Competi-
tion in Milwaukee and plan to attend
the International competition in
1992 q9he Winter Olympics in Al-
bertville, France.
In the 1988 Winter Olympics in
Calgary, people participated in a
snow sculpture exhibition as a
demonstration sport. But in 1992,
ice sculpting will be a medal award
competition.
Huron High School art teacher
Tom Bruker doesn't have such high
aspirations. He entered the competi-
tion with two of his students to
support arts in the community.
"I felt Winterfest was a very sig-
nificant challenge for the students.
They are getting the opportunity to
do things they couldn't have done in

the classroom," Bruker said.
Leslie Westin, a resident of Ani
Arbor carved the image of Shakcy
Jake. "We're carving the personality
of our mentor, whom we are persottr
ifying in ice, or should I say slush;"
she said.
The warm weekend sun melted
the snow into slush, making it diffi-
cult to carve details on the sculpL
tures. While many teams complained
about the quality of the snow, others
did not let the poor conditions stop
them from having a great weekend.
"With all the things that could
have gone wrong, like the weather,
everyone still survived all the ele-
ments and finished their pieces;'
Bruker said.
The teams were asked to stop
sculpting at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday,
when the judging for the Artist's'
Choice Award began. Among ihe
judges were the competitors acni
Mayor Gerald Jernigan.
"I think the ice sculptures a'r
great! I only wish we would get a
better break on the weather," Jern
gan said.
The Berlin Wall won first place
Shakey Jake took second and an an-
gel captured third place.
Ballots were distributed to passer-
bys who voted to give the replica of
Shakey Jake the People's Choice
Award.

~'
SAMANTHA SANDERS/Daily
Ann Arbor residents Adyn Akcasu and Bonnie Palmer build an ice sculpture of people breaking through the
Berlin Wall. The clay model served as a guideline for the team to follow.

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747-3334 News; 763-0376 Sports
763-2459 News 747-3336 Sports
THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Sec. of State Baker visits Romania to
encourage democracy, free elections

7'

BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) -
Secretary of State James Baker
yesterday gave moral support to op-
position parties and a gentle warning
to the interim government, which
has been accused of trying to consol-
idate power prior to elections.
During a 4 1/2-hour stopover in
Bucharest, he succeeded in under-
lining America's commitment to
free and fair elections without unduly
alienating government leaders who
have been strongly criticized by the
opposition.
Less than two weeks ago, the

United States criticized the National
Salvation Front government, which
took power after the December revo-
lution that toppled Communist dic-
tator Nicolae Ceausescu for attempt-
ing to impede opposition parties
contesting the May 20 general elec-
tion.
Baker did applaud "the reform
movement" in Romania since
Ceausescu's overthrow and execu-
tion, but he didn't praise the gov-
ernment.
Baker said he told the interim
President Ion Iliescu and Premier Pe-
tre Roman that "the betterment of re-

lations of the United States with
Romania will depend on fully free,
fair elections and the respect for hu-
man rights and the rights of minori-
ties."
Baker also announced that the U.
S. will offer Romania $80 million
in food assistance.
The Romanian government
previously had complained that the
U.S. had not fulfilled a promise to
send aid following the revolution.
Opposition leaders told Baker they
were still being intimidated by the
government, said Corneliu Coposu,
president of the National Peasant

Party, the country's largest opv
position group.
"The collective atmosphere wag
that there is fear, and it is a sustained
action of fear," Coposu said.
.A
The Front decision to participate
in the election, reversing an earlier
pledge to stay out, sparked mass
demonstrations by students and opi
ponents who demanded it resign. -
In a compromise, the Front agree4
to share power in a new Provisional
Council of National Unity, which
was inaugurated Friday to run th6
country until the election.

Meetings
UM Taekwondo Club --
beginners welcome 7-8:30 p.m.
2275 CCRB
Anthropology Club --- meeting 5
p.m. at Dominick's
UM Shorin-Ryu Karate-do
Club --- beginners welcome 7:30-
8:30 p.m. in the CCRB small
gym
Asian American Association ---
general meeting and sexuality
workshop at 7 p.m. in the Trotter
House
Summer Math --- program for
math related jobs and research this
summer at 5:10 p.m. in the
Undergraduate Math Commons
(3011 Angell Hall)
Undergraduate Sociology Club
--- general meeting with new

Historical Linguistics: When
Methodologies Clash" --- Gene
Schramm speaks at 4 p.m. in
3050 Frieze Bldg.
Undergraduate Math Club ---
will be addressed by Alex Ryba at
4 p.m. in 3201 Angell Hall
Furthermore
Free Tutoring - for all 100/200
level math, science and engineer-
ing courses; 8-10 p.m. in UGLi
Rm. 307
Safewalk - the night-time safety
walking service is available from
8pm-1:30am in UGLi Rm. 102 or
call 936-1000
Northwalk - the north-campus
night-time walking service is
available from 8pm-1:3Oam in
Bursley 2333 or call 763-WALK

-a
USSR to discuss removal of forces in Poland

MOSCOW (AP) - The Soviet
Union offered yesterday to negotiate
the withdrawal of its troops from
Poland as part of an overall cutback
of the Soviet military presence in
Eastern Europe. It also said it was
ready to begin reducing its troop
strength in the East bloc without
waiting for a treaty to be signed.
In a government statement
published by the official Tass news
agency, the Kremlin declared that the

detente by a relaxing of tension in
the military field in good time," the
government statement said.
President Mikhail Gorbachev and
President George Bush have called
for major troop cuts in Europe, and
the Soviet Union has been
negotiating with Czechoslovakia and
Hungary on the withdrawal of
troops.
"If the government of the Re-
public of Poland expresses an appro-

ceiling of 195,000 in Central
Europe.
Following the visit of Secretary of
State James Baker to Moscow last
week, Gorbachev suggested the limit
of 195,000 be extended to Europe as
a whole. That would mean
withdrawing 30,000 U.S. troops that
Bush's initiative would leave in
Britain, Greece, Italy, Spain and
Turkey.
The Kremlin statement said the

without waiting for the conclusiodi
of the Vienna accords, are alreadt
taking steps toward unilateral cuts t
their armed forces (and) making thei
structurally incapable of attack," th4
Kremlin said.

..
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