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February 06, 1990 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Cultural sites
receive grants
.for renovation
by Christine Kloostra
Daily Government Reporter
Some cultural sites in Ann Arbor will see changes
in the next few months due to the allocation of
$230,000 in state grants.
Six local cultural services will use the funds for
renovation or construction projects.
Michigan Senator Lana Pollack (D-Ann Arbor)
announced last week that Ann Arbor and Ann Arbor
Charter Township had received the cultural grants for
.1990 as part of the Michigan Equity Program.
"These awards will assist a variety of highly
desirable projects which have significant and long-
lasting cultural impact on our county," Pollack said.
HA $20,000 grant was awarded to the Ann Arbor
Art Association for improvements to its teaching area.
The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum received
$50,000 to build an enclosed entrance and a solar
greenhouse and install carpeting.
HA grant for $50,000 was given to the Farmer's
Market for replacement of their roof, downspout, and
eavesdrop.
*$25,000 in funding was awarded to the Historical
Society of Michigan for design and restoration of the
Toumy House, a historic home on Washtenaw Ave.,
which houses the Historical Society.
The Michigan Theater Foundation, Inc. received
$35,000 for construction of a two-story storage area for
the orchestra shell.
*$50,000 was given to the Ann Arbor Summer
Festival to plan, prepare, administer, and evaluate this
summer's festival.
"(The Michigan Equity Program) is a very important
program for organizations like our own to get state
funding. It has brought vitality to projects in the area of
history and culture," said Tom Jones of the Historical
Society of Michigan.
The competitive grants, part of the Michigan
Department of Commerce Equity Grant Program, are
awarded to local governments to support cultural
projects such as libraries, arts groups, and historical
facilities.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 6, 1990 - Page 3
February

focuses
health i
by Josephine Ballenger
Daily Staff Writer
For those who are not healthy -
and for those who are - February is
the month to celebrate wellness in
Washtenaw County.
"Well All Ways," a conglomera-
tion of the U-M Kinesiology and
Recreational Sports Departments and
the Parish Partnerships' Wellness
Month Task Force, has designated
February as Wellness Month.
Parish Partnerships is a coalition
of congregations, synagogues, and
health service agencies.
"Promoting changes in health
styles is important to having healthy
'All people are im-
portant and maybe
the way to reach
everyone is to
approach them a little
differently.'
-Carolyn Lewis
Parish Partnerships
volunteer.
lifestyles in Michigan," said said
Carolyn Lewis, a Parish Partner-
ships volunteer.
Sunday's "Well All Ways
Community Wellness Fair" - set
up in the North Campus Recreation
Building - kicked off the month's
events.
The fair's events ranged from
films, videotapes, relaxation ses-
sions, and screening tests in skin
care and substance abuse to physical
fitness tests for blood pressure, body

on
issues
weight, and health risk appraisal -
all free of charge.
State Sen. Lana Pollack (D-Ann
Arbor), Ann Arbor City coun-
cilmember Thomas Richardson (R-
Fifth Ward), and Cheryl Miles from
State Rep. Perry Bullard's (D-Ann
Arbor) office were among leaders 6f
the community who attended Sui-
day's event.
Among the 40 events planned for
the month are CPR and standard first
aid classes, skin wellness presenta-
tions, lectures, workshops, nature
walks, and a charity auction.
Bernie Siegel, cancer specialist at
Yale University and author of Love
Medicine and Miracles, will be
giving two speeches on Feb. 22.
Another "Wellness Fair" will be
held on the same day at the Power
Center.
Two days later, at Eastern Michi-
gan University, neighborhood
groups will be hosting a "Health
Promotion and Wellness Confer-
ence," designed for minority individ-
uals and families.
"All people are important and
maybe the way to reach everyone is
to approach them a little differently,"
Lewis said.
The month-long wellness fest
was modeled after a Wellness Week
held in September 1988 in Roanoke
Valley, Virginia.
"We would like to be a pattern
for the state of Michigan, just like
Roanoke was for us," Lewis said.
The Center for Disease Control
in Atlanta, Ga. has released survey
data showing the state of Michigan
as having one of the U.S.'s top 'five
highest death rates from lifestyle dis-
eases, said University Professor' of
Kinesiology Merle Foss, who served
as chair of the kick-off fair.
Such diseases include lung
cancer, heart disease, strokes, and
high blood pressure.
CINE RA iDINEXT0EY

"ULIEO'^LLMWA/aily
Mexican folk dance
In celebration of Chicano History, LSA junior Cristina Barrosa performs in the Pendleton
Room of the Union. Events are scheduled throughout the week.

Federal judge orders Reagan to release
videotaped deposition, diary excerpts

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k WASHINGTON (AP) - A
federal judge yesterday ordered former
President Ronald Reagan to give a
videotaped deposition for the Iran-
Contra trial of John Poindexter and
to turn over 33 entries from his diary
immediately to his former national
security adviser.
Reagan's testimony will be taken
before the Feb. 20 start of Poindex-
ter's trial, said U.S. District Judge
Harold Greene.
Reagan promptly invoked execu-
tive privilege to avoid turning por-
tions of his diaries over to Poindex-
ter. "Former President Reagan
hereby asserts his claim to the con-
stitutionally protected privacy of his
diaries," said Theodore Olson, one of
Reagan's attorneys.

The judge's order gave Reagan
and the Bush administration until
Friday to invoke executive privilege
on the matter of videotaped testi-
mony.
Greene ruled that he will allow
Poindexter to question Reagan on a
range of subjects.
Poindexter will be permitted to
ask Reagan whether he approved
Poindexter's denials to Congress that
former White House national secu-
rity staffer Oliver North was raising
money and providing military advice
to the Nicaraguan Contra rebels.
Poindexter is charged with ob-
struction and conspiracy in connec-
tion with those denials. The re-
sponses sent to Congress by
Poindexter embraced false denials

about North's involvement which
had been sent to Congress in 1985
by Poindexter's predecessor, Robert
McFarlane.
Poindexter will be allowed to ask
Reagan about "the president's
knowledge regarding the relationship
of Oliver North with specific indi-
viduals involved in Iran-Contra ac-
tivities."
Greene renewed his order that
Reagan immediately furnish
Poindexter with diary excerpts per-
taining to U.S. arms sales to Iran
and the Reagan administration secret
assistance to the Contras.
The Justice Department's request
to push back the deadline for surren-
dering the diary entries "is nothing
more than an attempt to delay" and

is "out of the questin," Greene said.
The Justice Department had asked
Greene to order Iran-Contra prosecu-
tors and POindexter to attemt to re-
sume negotiations on a summary of
the diary entries. Earlier negotiations
broke down partly because Poindex-
ter declined to tell prosecutors what
he expected to prove through Rea-
gan's testimony.
Poindexter and Reagan had ob-
jected to having the former president
give a videotaped depostition.
Poindexter wants Reagan as a wit-
ness in the courtroom. Reagan is re-
sisting giving testimony in any
forms, on the ground that com-
pelling him to testify would have an
adverse effect on the presidency.

SAY IT IN TIE...
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

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Experts disagree on Moynihan

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) -
Two of the foremost experts on So-
cial Security offered conflicting ad-
vice as Congress opened hearings
yesterday on the capital's hottest
domestic topic of the year: whether
to cut the taxes that finance the pen-
sion system.

Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D-N.Y.)
has proposed a tax reduction of up to
$300 a year for higher-income work-
ers to prevent the government from
using surplus Social Security taxes
to pay for other federal programs and.
making the government deficit ap-
pear smaller than it is. The Bush

administration vigorously opposes
the cut as a threat to Social Security
benefits and an opening for increases
in other taxes.
The Senate Finance Committee
arranged to hear yesterday from the
Social Security administrator, the
General Accounting Office and two

x-cut plan
recognized authorities who are taking
opposing positions on Moynihan's
bill.
Robert Myers, who helped create
the system in 1934 and was chief ac-
tuary for 23 years, has endorsed the
reduction.

-s

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

3

Meetings
LaGROC - The Lesbian and Gay
Males' Rights Organizing Com-
mittee meets at 7:30 p.m. in
Union 3000; 7 p.m. to set agenda
Student Struggle for Oppressed
Jewry - weekly meeting at 6:30
in Hillel
Women's Club Lacrosse - 4-6
p.m. at the Coliseum (5th. and
Hill)
Iranian Student Cultural Club
- the non-political, non-religious
group meets at 7:45 in the League
UM cycling --- team meeting and
rollers riding 6 p.m. in the Sports
Coloseum
Greeks Recycle --- meeting for
Recycle UM 8:30 p.m. 1046
Dana Bldg. (School of Natural
Resources)
Sigma Iota Rho --- mass meeting
for international relations
fraternity 7 p.m. in the 6th Floor
Haven Lounge
Indian and Pakistani-
American Students' Council ---
general body meeting 7-8 p.m.
4103 Union

Speakers
"Dia de los Muertos y
Tradiciones Mexicanas" ---
Maria Guadaloupe-Heaton speaks
on cultural Mexican traditions of
the holiday 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the
Trotter House
Poetry reading --- Robert Hass
reads from his poetry 4 p.m. in
Rackham Amphitheatre
Furthermore
ECB Peer Writing Tutors -
available for help from 7-11 p.m.
at the Angell and 611 Church St.
computing centers
Safewalk - the night-time safety
walking service runs form 8pm-
1:30am in Rm. 102 UGLi or call
936-1000
Northwalk - the north-campus
night-time walking service runs
from 8pm-1:30am in Bursley
2333, or call 763-WALK
Strecker AIDS memorandum --
- part of the BSU/Abeng film
series 7:30 p.m. 126 East Quad
Career Pathways in Economics

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and renovate homes for homeless people
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a
1

MASS *MEETING
Tuesday, February 6,1990
7:00 pm Wolverine Rm - Michigan Union
- r

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