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January 24, 1990 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

____- __RTS
The Michigan Daily Wednesday, January 24,1990
Red Hots burn for Ozone

BY BRAD HEAVNER
IT'S happening again. Glory be.
Last year's benefit was a genuine
house rocker, not to mention that it
raised money for one of Ann Arbor's
outstanding public services. And
with this year's show featuring an
important anniversary plus some of
Ann Arbor's best known blues
artists, it appears that another
evening of goodwill and sizzling
sounds is in store.
They're calling it the "Ozone
House20th Birthday Benefit" and
once again the headliner is C.J.
Chenier and the Red Hot Louisiana
Band. They brought the house down
last year and if they remain true to
form they're sure to do it again. In
addition, this year's event will fea-
ture Peter Madcat Ruth and Catfish
Keith. These two top-notch solo
musicians playing together on one
stage is guaranteed to put the audi-
ence in blues heaven. The organiza-
lkion's own Ozone House Band will
mark its debut as well.
Ozone House has been serving
runaway and homeless youth and
their families in the Ann Ar-
bor/Ypsilanti area since 1969. They
provide individual and family coun-
seling; emergency food, clothing and
shelter; temporary foster care; parent
and youth support groups; a 24-hour
crisis line; community presentations
and volunteer training; and an Inde-
pendent Living Program for home-
less youth. In recent years, they have
expanded their services to include the
Substance Free Support Program and
Miller House, a transitional living
group home for 16- to 19-year-old
homeless people.
Clayton Joseph Chenier is the
son of the man recognized as the

King of Zydeco, Clifton Chenier.
C.J. was the first in his family to be
born outside of Louisiana and,
although he grew up independent of
his father's career, he obviously had
that New Orleans swing in his
blood. He led R&B bands in his
youth as a saxophonist, also filling
in on any other instrument he could
get his hands on.
According the the liner notes on
his first record, one day in 1978,

plays a Soprano brand accordion that
his father gave him about a week be-
fore his death.
C.J.'s style differs somewhat
from his father's, given his R&B
background. Their album, "Let Me
in Your Heart," features zydeco mu-
sic tinged with various influences
and has sold well throughout the
U.S.
. Sticking with Southern musical
styles, Madcat Ruth is Ann Arbor's

Ruth's bandmate for the benefit,
guitarist Catfish Keith, specializes
in Delta Blues, Hokum, and Down
Island numbers. His first nationally
distributed album has been a great
success and the collaboration with
Ruth is sure to be one of those rare
live jubilees that it hurts to miss.
The benefit serves as the kickoff of
Ruth's and Keith's grand five-night
Clayton Joseph
Chenier is the son of
the man recognized
as the King of Zydeco,
Clifton Chenier. C.J.
was the first in his
family to be born
outside of Louisiana
and, although he grew
up independent of his
father's career, he
obviously had that
New Orleans swing in
his blood.

Page 8
UMASC artists
strike abalance
BY RONA SHERAMY
Many Asian Americans feel "white American" inside and look
"yellow Asian" outside. The dichotomy creates inner conflict and
confusion. Many wish to feel completely American. Two criteria to
feeling American: not only am American but look American as well.
Changing one's look is difficult, but in Art, it is easy. - Jong Kim, LSA
senior, in "The Banana Syndrome"
In the University of Michigan Asian Student Coalition's (UMASC)
third annual art show entitled "Striking a Balance - Asian and
American," contributing artist Jong Kim describes the difficulty of
feeling American while looking Asian. In his work, Manifestation of a
Banana Syndrome, Kim paints a stereotypical American - a blond,
blue-eyed male - in front of the American flag. According to Kim,
some Asian Americans feel their features prevent them from being
accepted completely as Americans, and Manifestation is representative of
this. The Banana Syndrome - being yellow on the outside but white
and all-American on the inside - results in frustration and inner turmoil,
he adds.
Kim's painting easily transforms the Asian figure into someone "all-
American." But, Kim asserts, such a denial of cultural background does
not resolve the conflict. Asians should not have to peel off or paint over
the layers of their skin to reveal an acceptable, American core. Rather, he
said, they should be accepted as both Asians and Americans with the
freedom to express each cultural identity.
Christopher Yin, a senior in the School of Art, echoes the tension of-
the Banana Syndrome in his logo design for the Asian American
Association. The display of Yin's design fits well into the exhibit
because the logo also addresses the relationship between the East and the
West. Yin's design combines Asian-style lettering that resembles quill
and ink calligraphy with Western-style lettering that looks like
typewritten print. The logo, consisting only of the letters "AAA," asserts
a message of both conflict and harmony.
While the eastern "A" differs greatly from the western "A," the letters
still form a smooth, gradual line of transition. The design presents the
uniqueness and the union of each printing style and indeed strikes a
balance between East and West.
In contrast to Kim's painting and Yin's logo, Rich Yun's sculptures
and stoneware do not make an overt statement about being Asian and
American. As Yun describes, his pieces do not have "a conscious Asian
American quality," as it is difficult to embody cultural identity in a
single artisitic piece. Yun displays a unique style in the exhibit, though,
through three curvaceous, bulbous stoneware pieces.
See ART, page 9

No, they're not about to get blasted by Greenpeace for breaking environ-
mental codes. C.J. Chenier and the Red Hot Louisiana Band are actually
perpetuating the trend of rockin' for a cause.

Michigan tour. After that, the duo
will likely exist only as a memory
for those who saw one of the shows.
The good done for Ozone House,
however, will live on.
C.J. CHENIER, MADCAT RUTH
WITH CA TFISH KEITH, AND THE
OZONE HOUSE BAND will per-
form at the Ozone House Benefit,
tonight at the Blind Pig at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $8 in advance at
Schoolkids, Herb David, and PJ's
Used Records; $10 at the door.

Clifton phoned C.J.'s mother. "Tell
him to meet me in Bridge City," he
said of his son, "I'm takin' himon
the road with me." After four years
as a member of the Red Hots, C.J.
was appointed band leader. The next
year, Clifton began teaching him to
play the accordion. Today, C.J.

claim to national blues fame. He has
been blowing a mean harp in and
beyond this area for many years and
anyone who has seen one of his live
performances with The Pressure
Cooker knows the power with which
he can get an entire hall full of peo-
ple on its feet.

eeipe

Thursday
January 25
7:30 PM
Pond Room
Michigan Union

m

m

Mas MeetI ing

I

ARE YOU THICK AND TIRED OF IT?
The Weight Control Clinic
at The University of Michigan

Interested in:

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Nutrition Seminars, Exercise Classes, Counseling, Body Composition
Testing, Computer Diet Analysis, Personal Exercise Training

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concert promotion,
sound production,
graphic arts,
publications,
booking.
meeting jazz crtists.
learning about Jaz,
or just hearing some
great live music?

I

* Winter Program Begins January 29, 1990
Registration by Appointment January 8-25
* Winter Open House, January 18, 7-8pm
Room 1250 Central Campus Recreation Building
747-2722

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