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January 23, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-01-23

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 23, 1990
Hugo survivors continue struggle
to repair damage in S. Carolina

LANE, S.C. (AP) - The
forgotten victims of Hurricane Hugo
are still struggling to survive in
roofless trailers along gravel back
roads in coastal Williamsburg
County, or in modest cinderblock
homes on the outskirts of tobacco
towns.
Life for hundreds - some say
thousands - of South Carolina's
rural poor is not much better than
the day after the killer hurricane
struck.'
The storm, which crashed ashore
last Sept. 21 at Charleston, claimed
29 lives and caused an estimated
$5.9 billion damage when it cut a
swath hundreds of miles wide
through the state. After Hugo, 24 of
the state's 46 counties were declared
federal disaster areas.
While relief immediately flowed

to coastal areas, counties dozens of
miles inland - many of them rural
and populated by poor blacks -
were ignored in some cases.
Four months after the hurricane,
there are few offers to help, even
though workers and building
supplies are still needed, said Edna
Hampton, the Hugo outreach
coordinator for Williamsburg
County.
Officials estimate as many as
4,000 structures were destroyed or
heavily damaged in that county, one
of the poorest in the state.
"Before the storm came, some of
the homes were half liveable," she
said. "Now they're not liveable.
People are a little bit discouraged.
We feel forgotten in a sense."
She has been trying to locate
people who may not have applied for

disaster assistance yet. Illiteracy,
lack of communication and
transportation and suspicion of
government have kept many rural
residents from seeking aid, she said.
In her small cinderblock house on
the outskirts of Kingstree, Audrey
Epps fights back tears as she
remembers how the storm smashed
the windows and tore the roof off her
home. Ms. Epps and her 78-year-old
invalid mother, Zeal, had to seek
shelter in the only room of the five-
room house that didn't leak. She lost
clothing and personal effects.
Ms. Epps lost her job because
the pharmaceutical company where
she worked third shift was shut down
by storm damage. She can't find
another third-shift job and can't
afford to pay someone to look after
her mother during the day. When she

worked nights, a relative stayed with
her mother.
Nor does she have the funds to
adequately repair and refurnish her
home. She received $2,750 from the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency, but supplies to fix the roof
alone came to $1,800. The ceilings
and walls are waterlogged and still
need repair. Plastic sheeting covers
broken windows, keeping in heat
from a wood-burning stove.
"I didn't want a beautiful home. I
only wanted a house I could live in,"
Ms. Epps said recently.
Recovery from the storm won't
be measured by how well the state's
beaches are restored or how many
tourists return, but by how all of the
state's people recover, says J.T.
McLawhorn Jr., president of the
Columbia Urban League.

LaRouche's mail fraud and conspiracy
convictions are upheld in federal court

I

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - The
tax and mail fraud conspiracy convic-
tions of political extremist Lyndon
LaRouche were upheld yesterday by
a federal appeals court.
In a unanimous ruling, the ap-
peals panel rejected claims of proce-
dural flaws in the trial of LaRouche,
who ran for president in 1980 and
1984 and has endorsed theories of
high-level conspiracy against him by
world leaders.
LaRouche, through a
spokesperson, proclaimed his inno-
cence and that of his associates and
said the case would be appealed fur-

ther.
Former Attorney General Ramsey
Clark, chief attorney for LaRouche's
appeal, argued that U.S. District
Judge Albert Bryan of Alexandria al-
lowed only 34 days from arraign-
ment to trial and failed to adequately
question jurors on how much they
knew about the defendant.
But the appeals panel found no
abuse of discretion in Bryan's refusal
to delay the trial.
"When Judge Bryan denied the de-
fendants' motion for a continuance,
he possessed a highly relevant piece
of information: the defense waited 18

days to move for a continuance," the
panel said. "Defense counsel's pro-
longed silence leads to the reasonable
inference that 34 days was not a
clearly insufficient period of time be-
tween arraignment and trial."
LaRouche was convicted in De-
cember 1988 on 11 counts of mail
fraud, one count of conspiracy to
commit mail fraud and one count of
conspiracy to defraud the Internal
Revenue Service. He was sentenced
to 15 years in prison.
"This is a pure and simple trav-

esty of justice," LaRouche said
through a spokesperson. "This trav-
esty will be overturned some way
eventually. We will continue to
fight it. I am innocent and my co-de-
fendants are innocent of any of the
criminal charges brought against
us."
LaRouche said the courts have
decided that "innocence and justice
are irrelevant and that the expediency
of serving the demands of an out-of-
control Justice Department are more
important."

MSA
Continued from page 1
"My obligation is to pursue ev-£
ery possible avenue to make sure
those students (who received seats
which were invalidated) get those
seats," Johnson said.
"As much as any other student, I
want the student government to run

on its own," he added. "But the stu-
dent government process failed here."
Given that failure, Johnson said he
had "no qualms at all about going to
a higher authority."
As of yesterday, Duderstadt had
not informed -the office of student
services as to what role it might
play in the investigation, Henry
Johnson said.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Barry seeks rehabilitation
WASHINGTON - Mayor Marion Barry, facing a cocaine possession
charge, flew to Florida for treatment yesterday while political speculation
intensified back home concerning arpossible City Hall campaign by Jesse
Jackson.
Barry's spokesperson, Lurma Rackley, said the mayor had checked into
a center in West Palm Beach, Fla., to be treated for alcoholism. She had
said the day before that details about his health would be kept private but
"the most serious problem is alcoholism."
With Barry gone from City Hall for at least 30 days, talk and maneu-
vering in connection with the November election picked up speed.
A Jackson associate said of the civil rights leader who moved to Wash-
ington last year, "I know he's getting a lot of pressure to run. I don't
know if he's going to."
Speaking only on condition of anonymity, the source said "a lot of the
pressure is coming from Marion's people."
Szoka accepts Vatican post
DETROIT - Cardinal Edmund Szoka, known for his cost-cutting and
fund-raising success as archbishop in the nation's fifth-largest diocese,
yesterday accepted a papal appointment to bring his financial know-how
to the Vatican.
A Vatican announcement said Szoka will head the Prefecture for Eco-
nomic Affairs of the Holy See, which draws up the Vatican's budget.
Szoka announced his acceptance of the position in a news conference at
Sacred Heart Seminary.
Pope John Paul bI and Szoka discussed the Vatican post in December
during one of the Archbishop's visits to Rome. The prelate has been
serving on a special commission studying ways to overcome the
Vatican's chronic budget deficit.
Sometime in June, Szoka will succeed Cardinal Giuseppe Caprio
resigned the post for reasons of age. Until then, Szoka said, he will
continue his duties in the 1.5 million member archdiocese and offer advice
in choosing his successor.
Mich. court orders release of
adoption papers in Dodge case
LANSING- A Dearborn woman won a key legal round yesterday in
her fight to prove she is a long unknown daughter of wealthy automobile
pioneer John Dodge.
The Michigan Court of Appeals ordered Wayne County Probate Court
to release the adoption records of Frances Mealbach who claims to be a
Dodge descendent.
Mealbach, in a haunting story that spurred a book and an episode on
NBC-TV's "Unsolved Mysteries" television show, learned upon her fa-
ther's death that she was an adopted child.
Mealbach filed her petition for "determination of heirs" in 1984, say-
ing she Siamese twin of Dodge's daughter, Frances Dodge.
Dodge, an early and successful automobile manufacturer, left a com-
pany worth about $52 million. The carefully drafted will set up a trust for
his children, with the trust money to be divided among the heirs.
Israeli police free Husseini
JERUSALEM - Faisal Husseini, a leading Palestinian activist and
potential peace negotiator with Israel, was freed from jail yesterday. The
United States had called his detention an obstacle to Middle East
diplomacy.
Husseini was freed after three days of questioningeabout suspicions that
he belonged to a "hostile organization" and gave other Palestinians $450
to buy military uniforms.
Husseini lives in Arab east Jerusalem, which Israel has annexed. No
charges were filed, but police said the investigation would continue.
At a news conference in east Jerusalem later, Husseini said he was
arrested because Israel did not want him in a Palestinian delegation
expected to hold preliminary peace talks with Israeli officials in Cairo.
Shamir has said he does not want Palestinians from east Jerusalem
included because that would undermine Israel's claim to the city.
EXTRAS
George cuts Nancy's rug
WASHINGTON - President Bush has pulled the rug on Nancy Rea-
gan, replacing a $49,625 floor covering that she had installed in the Oval
Office just 18 months ago.
"It was not terribly attractive. The president (Bush) did not like it,"
said Larry Hokanson, president of the Houston company that made a
$28,550 rug to replace the one purchased for Mrs. Reagan.

The redecorating included new-draperies with a multiple-swag valance,
a Chinese-style mahogany coffee table, reupholstered high-back armchairs
for in front of the fireplace and a pair of new, three-cushion sofas. The
fabrics are blue, gold and ivory.
"Most presidents put their own imprimatur on their office," Alixe
Glen, White House deputy press secretary, said yesterday.
White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater said Bush was "pleased
with his new decorations."
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 in-town and $39 out-of-town, for fall only $18.00 in-town and $22.00 out-of-town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
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E XTONAL STAFF:

BOMB
Continued from page 1
looked and had small conversations
and then they just walked past," said
Burton.
Beginning with the call the Ge-
ology department placed to the po-
lice, the investigation took 50 min-
utes, Tieman said. He said a detec-
tive in the department plans to fur-
ther investigate the case and the un-
known caller.

ASSAULT
Continued from page 1
"He wasn't slurring his words or
giving any hint of drunkenness,"
Caldwell said.
At yesterday's arraignment,
Brown stood mute as his attorney,
Michael Moran, requested a prelimi-
nary hearing for January 31. The
court charged Brown with "assault of
an officer with a deadly weapon
without intent to kill," an offense
which carries a 4-year maximum
sentence and/or a $2,000 fine.
Neither Brown nor his attorney
would comment on the case.

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