100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1989 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-21
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

189.. THE NATIONAL COLLL NEWSPAPER

0

Student Bode NOVEMBER 1989

9.

NOVEMBER 1989 4ment and Opinion

0

U.. THE NATION* COLLEGE NEWS

Hockey without the ice 'a great way to sweat'

By Rod Porsche
The Daily Barometer
Oregon State U.
Every Thursday night at 8:30, they
take the floor in Oregon State U.'s
women's PE building ready for another
night of intense action.
At a time when most students are in
front of the "Cosby Show" waiting for a
pizza to arrive, Floor Hockey Club mem-
bers are turning over benches to form
boundaries for the big game.
"I had never even touched a hockey
stick before, but it's real easy to pick up,"
said Bob Thayer, who is in his second
term as a club member. "It's a blast."
"It's a great way to sweat," club mem-
ber John Lance added.
It's shirts against skins every week.

'S
.A,.,.

PAUL CONE, THE DAILY BAROMETER, OREGON STATE U.
Goalie Neil Gearheart fends off an attack from the offense during a Floor Hockey Club session.

I Mt
....__
--
i . -__-- . __ __m_ _ -- - --_ ___

The most difficult task is convincing
someone to be goalie. "I'd rather take
shots at people than have them take
shots at me," newcomer Lee Hatter said.
They don't use a puck, opting for a
Mylec ball (about the size of a racquet-
ball). "The plastic puck just bounces
around too much," club President Joe
Conyard said. "A ball in floor hockey
works more like a puck on ice."
Conyard started the club at OSU last
fall. "This is kind of a 'feeler' year for me
and the club. I would definitely like to
see floor hockey form a league."
Floor hockey, also called Deckhockey,
has powerful leagues on the East Coast.
In the West, a league may just be a
dream, but Conyard is still optimistic.
"You only need five or six guys to make
a team," he said.
Exercise junkies
can cause more
harm than good
By Sonja Lewis
r State Press
Arizona State U.
An increasing number of men and
women are identified as obsessive-exer-
cise pathorexics - people addicted to
exercise as a way of controlling their
weight.
Pathorexics do not realize what they
are doing to themselves, according to
Arizona State U. health officials.
Pathorexic exercise is characterized
as an eating disorder and is often more
difficult to detect by the victim and oth-
ers than eating disorders like anorexia
or bulimia.
There are often visible signs with
anorexia or bulimia, such as vomiting
after meals and use of laxatives, but
overexercisers conceal some ofthe harm-
ful physical effects of their disorder.
ASU Health Center Physician Dale
Bowen said "massive amounts of run-
ning" often result in bone fractures,
muscle pulls and back problems.
Mary Lou Frank, ASU coordinator for
treatment of eating disorders, said most
overexercisers who think of physcial
activity as the only healthy way to lose
weight, deny that they are harming
themselves.
"People don't realize they have it
because they don't see it as a problem,"
she said. She said that exercising
becomes both physically and mentally
unhealthy when people exercise
because of feelings of guilt and remorse
after eating.
Alyne Yales, a U. of Arizona associate
professor of psychiatry, has studied
overexercisers and found some runners
resemble anorexics in several ways:
acmost are self-effacing, hard-working
achievers,
" most come from affluent or middle-
class families,
" intense exercise begins after a time
of depression or uncertain identity and
* exercise gives them feelings of self-
control.
ASU Health Center Nutritionist
Karen Moses said bulimics and
pathorexic exercisers are very similar
except in the way they manifest their
eating disorder. "Whatyou might be see-
ing in pathorexic exercisers is athletes
that like to exercise and don't like to
vomit," she said.

THE NATIONAL COLLEGE
NEWSPAPER
By presenting a wide range of opinions and ideas
reprinted from hundreds of campus newspapers, we
hope to enhance the quality of campus life as we inform,
entertain and engage the national student body. We
acknowledge the commitment of student journalists
across the nation, supported by their media advisers and
journalism professors, to report the activities, issues and
concerns of their fellow students.
PRESIDENT AND PUBISHER
Sheena Paterson-Berwick
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
George F. Taylor
Special Projects, Mark Charnock
EDITORS ON FELLOWSHIP
Charles A. Hahn, Nort eastern News, Northeastern U.
Jacki Hampton, The Breeze, James Madison U.
Kathleen Kobernik, Western Herald, Western Michigan U.
Hector P. Vargas Jr., The Red and Black, U. of Georgia
CAMPUS RELATIONS DIRECTOR
Dick Sublette
EDITORIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
TOM ROLNICKI, Executive Director, Associated
Collegiate Press
DR DAVID KNO, Immediate Past President, College
Media Advisers, The Bal State Daily ews, Ball State U.,
IN
ERIC JACOBS, Immediate Past President, College
Newspaper Business & Advertising Managers, The Daily
Pennsylvanian, 13. of Pennsylvania
EDMUND SULLIVAN, Director, Columbia Scholastic
Press Association, Columbia U., NY
DR. J. DAVID REED, Immediate Past President, Society
for College Journalists, The Daily Eastern News,
Eastern Illinois U.
FRED WEDDLE, Immediate Past President, Western
Association of University Publications Managers,
Oklahoma Daily, U. of Oklahoma
MONA CRAVENS, Director of Student Publications,
Daily Trojan, U. of Southern California
DR. FRANK RAGULSKY, Manager of Student Media,
Daily Barometer, Oregon State U.
JAN T. CHILDRESS, Director of Student Publications,
University Daily, Texas Tech U.
W.B. CASEY, Publisher, The Daily Iowan, U. of Iowa
ED BARBER, General Manager, Independent Florida
Alligator, U. of Florida
HARRY MONTEVIDEO, General Manager, The Red &
Black, U. of Georgia
BRUCE D. ITULE, Manager of Student Publications,
State Press, Arizona State U.
RICHARD C. LYTLE, General Manager, Texas Student
Publications, The Daily Texan, U. of Texas, Austin
MARKETING DIRECTOR
Gregory L. Dickson
RESEARCH DIRECTOR
Steve Nachtman
OPERATIONS DIRECTOR
Annalee Ryan
Assistant: John Ziegler
Circulation Manager: Wendelyn Rea
Regional Representatives
Ross Fischman
Dan Fox
Kathy Wagner
Assistant to the Publisher: Elizabeth Franzeim
SALES DIRECTOR
Jacqueline Wisner
SALES OFFICES
Los Angeles (213) 4502921
Account Executive: Kim Briggs
New York (212) 840.6080
Account Executive: Karen C. Tarrant
Assistant: Nancy McDonald
Boston (617) 8904959
Publishers'Edge of New England
Chicago (312) 7824492
The Mc ann Group
Dallas (2140 9602883
Terney and Company
Detroit (313)373-1026
Wynkoop, Hannah, Albaum
Atlanta(404)491-1419
Quenzer/Stites
Florida (407) 241-3103
Quener/Stites
Advertising Coordinator. Troy Renneberg
Classified/Special Sections Manager
Jennifer Flynn
Account Executives: Jason Maier, Eric Bass
THE AMERICAN COLLEGIATE NETWORK
Albert T. Ehringer, Chairman

MARNE-L\FE
AGANST
DRUNK
DRIVING

MIKE RITTER, STATE PRESS, ARIZONA STATE U.
Pornography shouldn't
warrant our protection

.

By Jason Toth
The Daily Utah Chronicle
U. of Utah
Freedom of speech is inextricably
linked to freedom of thought and, as
such, is given great deference within the
American legal system. Under our
Constitution, freedom of speech is
extended to every form of expression
until that expression dangerously trans-
gresses another important constitution-
al value. Yet, if a protected nexus exists
betwixt speech and thought, it seems fair
to ask what type of thought is encour-
aged by defending hardcore pornogra-
phy with the First Amendment.
Even some of the most devout civil lib-
ertarians have become distraught by
defenders of pornography who cite the
First Amendment to protect their pecu-
liar form of "speech." It is hardly con-
ceivable that it was the intent of the
framers to formulate a legal "catch-all"
in the First Amendment. The First
Amendment and the protections con-
tained within it were designed not as
absolute demarcations, but rather as
ideals that could be balanced against
other democratic values.
Certainly the jurisprudence of the
Supreme Court, while giving substan-
tial weight to "free speech," has never
held that free speech reigned supreme
over other equally important human and
constitutionally enumerated values.
Indeed, the Court's perpetual struggle to
define the parameters of guidelines such
as the "fighting words doctrine" and the
"clear and present danger test" indicate
that all speech is indeed not protected.
Pornography reduces men and women to
mere animals, incapable of intellectual,

spiritual or emotional intimacy. Irving
Kristol, a legal philosopher, adds that
the effects of pornography are particu-
larly destructive and dehumanizing
toward women. Pornography, as a pro-
fession (if such a term can be applied), is
dominated by men, both as producers
and consumers. Women in pornography
are presented as animal recipients of
grotesque acts of sexuality.
The usual response from defenders of
pornography via the First Amendment
is that if we leave pornography alone, it
will disappear by itself. Consumers will
see pornography for what it is and refuse
to buy it. Simultaneously, we will exempt
ourselves from the dirty task of regulat-
ing or restricting the purchase of porno-
graphic material.
This is really quite unpersuasive.
First, the primary consumers of hard-
core porn are not curious, adolescent
schoolboys; they are adults who enjoy
pornography in and of itself. Would any-
one suggest that a voyeur or rapist would
be likely to "mellow" his sexual tenden-
cies once he had "had his fill" of whatever
he was seeking? Similarly, we have little
reason to believe serious consumers of
pornography will abandon it once they
have "had enough."
When we argue for restricting pornog-
raphy, we need not adopt some Victorian
notion of morality. Quite the opposite is
true.
In restricting pornography, we affirm
that sexuality is, indeed, good and
deserving of respect. We affirm that sex,
when connected with intimacy and affec-
tion, is worthwhile.
We need not involve religious or
parochial moralities to argue that
pornography is degrading.

Flag-burni
is protecti
By Jack McPeck
The Daily Beacon
U. of Tennessee, Knoxvilk
By a 5-to-4 vote this su
Supreme Court reversed the
and sentence of a man who 1
U.S. flag outside of the 19841
National Convention in Dalla
the decision holds that flag b
legal and legitimate form of p
as such, is protected by
Amendment guaranteeing f
speech.
The public outrage that fo
decision is not surprising. 2
poll showed that Americans
with the decision by an aln
margin and about 70 percen
it should be made illegal to bu
Equally unsurprising is
with which the decision has
political issue. President Ge
has called for a constitution
ment to outlaw this form of p
Congress is debating a statut
flag burning.
But in their zeal to flow v
opinion, our elected officials
ing the reason why such a de
key to the strength of the Co
That a conservative court
der such a seemingly liber
(especially by the 5-to-4 m
typically represents the co:
majority on the court) is a rea
of the First Amendment. Th
refused to do exactly what A
loves to do - make a politic
of the Constitution.
The flag symbolizes the fi
America-that any person is f
and express his or her though
reprisal from the elected gove
Despite the great power of t
must resist the temptation
symbols and icons. In doing
forget they are only represen
higher ideal.
Letter to the editor
Article was u
Dear Editor:
I am writing to express co
an article in your September i
anonymous gay sex titled "S
bathrooms worries gay acti
article is rank sensationalis:
it does present the opinion of c
dent in a positive light as bei
bathroom sex, the article ove
ative.
It promotes the concepts
promiscuous deviants and
dirty and dangerous. Thougi
deny that anonymous sex do
publicize it in this manner su,
it is a mainstream lifestyle fc
And to publicize it on cam
serves to promote negative se
in those college students wh
oping facets of their sexual i
I protest this negative st
and want to strongly encou
follow up with a positive articl
vices and resources available
lesbian students on college c
Mark vo
Secretary, Standing Coin
Lesbian and Gay Affairs, The
College Personnel

A FREE PHONE CALL COULD HELP PUT YOU IN A
NEW GM CAR OR LIGHT-DUTY TRUCK THE EASY WAY.

THE GMAC
COLLEGE GRADUATE
FINANCE PLAN...GET $400
AND MAKE No PAYMENTS
FOR 90 DAYS.*
Call 1-800-237-3264, and you'll find
out how GMAC can make your after-
college math a lot simpler.
With GMAC's College Graduate
Finance Plan, you'll receive:
M $400 to apply to your down
payment when you buy a new
GM car or light-duty truck.
le' OR, $400 to apply to your first
lease payment.
/ PLUS, when you buy you may be
able to defer your flrst'payment
for 90 days. .giving you time to
get your career up and running
before you start making
payments. Finance charges accrue
from date of purchase.
Another important fact: Your $400
discount is in addition to any rebate
or special financing rate available
when you buy your new GM vehicle.

GUARANTEED FINANCING.
That's right. Your financing is
guaranteed as long as you qualify for
the plan. You can find out all the
details about qualifying in your
GMAC College Graduate Finance
Plan information pack.
CALL 1-800-237-3264 RIGHT
NOW FOR FREE INFORMATION.
Call 1-800-237-3264 now - or send
in the coupon - to receive your free
GMAC College Graduate Finance
Plan information pack. There's no
obligation and you could receive a
$400 discount on your new GM
vehicle. Do it today!
GMAC is an Equal Credit Opportunity Company.
*This deferral of payment option is not available
with leasing or other GMAC programs or in
Michigan and Pennsylvania, or on vehicles with a
cash-selling price of less than $10,000 in
New Jersey.
©1989 GMAC. All Rights Reserved.

I Yes! Please send my free GMAC
College Graduate Finance Plan
| information pack. (Print clearly.)
Name I
I Mailing Address Apt.
1 E
City
State ZIP
College Name
Date of Graduation/
! I
Mail to:
GMAC College Graduate
Finance Plan
General Motors Building, Annex 240
Detroit, Michigan 48202
IOr call 1-800-237-3264 now to request
your free GMAC College Graduate
Finance Plan information.f
GMAC
OFFICIAL SPONSOR OF
L AMERICA'S DREAMS-

I I

In September, U. asked
students if the U.S. govem-
ment should support the
actions of Chinese student
protesters. Seventy-four
percent said yes, the govern-
ment should support the
protesters. U. also asked stu-
dentsifmilitaiyorcommunity
service should be a require-
mentto receive financial aid,
and while 83 percent
opposed military service,
only 60 percent opposed
community service.

U E STUDENT OPINION POLL
1-800-662-5511
Do you think date rape should be
made a campus offense,
punishable by the student court?
(See related story on page 2.)

U. is published eight times a year
by The American Collegiate
Network, 3110 Main Street, Santa
Monica, CA 90405. Tel.: (213) 450-
2921. Copyright 1989. All rights
reserved. Subscriptions: $18.

BPA

CHEVROLET * PONTIAC - OLDSMOBILE * BUICK * CADILLAC * GMC TRUCK

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan