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November 17, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-17

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Noted author talks
of powerlessness

The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 17, 1989 - Page 5
University research
programs 'healthy'
for fiscal year 1989

by Daniel Poux
Daily Staff Writer
"World hunger is not the result of
a scarcity of food, or a scarcity of
land; it's due to a scarcity of democ-
racy.
This was the theme of Frances
Moore Lappe's speech last night in
Angell Hall. The speech capped off
the efforts of the World Hunger Edu-
cation Action Committee
(WHEAC), on the day of the Interna-
tional OXFAM Fast for a World
Harvest.
Author of such renowned books
as Diet for a Small Planet and
World Hunger: Twelve Myths,
Lappe talked of the absence of ac-
countability in our democratic soci-
ety. "Government elites and those
in power must realize the account-
ability of their actions," she said.
Lappe, who gave her first public
speech here at the University in
1971, spoke of her confidence in
what she termed the "the alternate
American tradition". Through exam-

ples like the women's movement
and the civil rights movement, there
has always been a feeling of fellow-
ship among America's activists,
Lappe said.
She closed her speech with some
suggestions for contemporary social
action, and stressed that we "need to
see how our own actions can and
will lead to the rediscovery and rede-
velopment of true democracy."
"The people of this country must
take the initiative, take action, to
make the system work for us. We
must put the experts on tap, not on
top," she said in closing.
In an interview later, Lappe
;ommended the efforts of WHEAC,
and made it clear that groups like
OXFAM must work harder to end
world hunger.,
"Government-to-government aid
is the problem, not the solution.
The only aid that has the potential of
being effective is people-to-people
aid," she said.

by Diane Cook
Daily Research Reporter

JULIE HULLMAN/UaiIY
Frances Moore Lappe, noted author and world hunger activist, examines
the causes behind world hunger during her speech last evening in Angell
Hall, sponsored by WHEAC, the World Hunger Education Action
Comm itte e.

The University research expendi-
ture of $264.5 million during fiscal
year 1989 reflected a 12.7 percent in-
crease over 1988, said Vice President
for Research William Kelly.
Fiscal year 1989 was a "health)
year" with "continued diversificatior
of faculty research funding," he said.
"The diversity of the University's
research activities is a major con-
tributor to the continued capacity foi
growth and development," Kelly
said, adding that faculty members
compete fiercely for funding.
"In 1987, when the University
began to monitor so-called 'mega-
awards' [those exceeding $400,000],
there were 50 such awards in thai
year. In the fiscal year 1989, two
years later, the number doubled to
109 with a total value of
$101,000,000," said Kelly.
Research support from federal
agencies accounted for 67.4 percent
($178.3 million) of the expenditures.
Major contributors were Health and
Human Services, the National
Science Foundation, the Department
of Defense, the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration, and the
Department of Energy.
A steady increase in funding from
non-federal sources has also con-
tributed to the growth.
"Following a decline in fiscal
0 o <pO

year 1982 and fiscal 1983, research
expenditures from federal sponsors
have increased significantly over the
past five years. Expenditures from
non-federal sources have shown a
more modest but steady increase dur-
ing this period," said Kelly.
While research funding from ex-
ternal sources is growing, University
funds have levelled off at approxi-
mately $25 million, suggesting that
the increase of research on campus is
not at the expense of increased stu-
dent tuition.
"The money is earned by the fac-
ulty. It's not taken from the stu-
dents. It's not taken from the Uni-
versity," said Kelly.
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Ar-
bor) said research funding increases
have an effect on the overall Univer-
sity budget pool.
"It's a given that every research
dollar contributes something to the
University," said Baker, adding that
dollars in research overhead may not
mean a dollar increase in tuition. "It
gives us an additional source of in-
come."
Baker said that the state also real-
izes the advantages of housing a ma-
jor research institution. "There's a
broad spectrum of benefit [to the
state] in supporting an institution
which is truly a nationally respected
research institution."

i

,Denny' s

O

by Tara Gruzen
Daily City Reporter
Late night dining in Ann Arbor,
not easy to begin with, has just be-
come a little more difficult. Denny's
Testaurant on E. Liberty Street is no
;longer in business.
The restaurant closed, apparently
for good, at 3:00 a.m. on Monday
,night. It was officially scheduled to
* close this Sunday, but when em-
- ployees were told on Monday that
the restaurant was planning to close,

n Liberty
they announced that they would not
continue to work.
"It was really chaotic in the
restaurant," said Allan Kessel, an
LSA junior who was in Denny's
Monday night. "A lot of the help
was sitting down and talking with
the guests. Our waitress said she
would give us free food if we gave
her a big tip."
Mark Gietler, the general man-
ager of the restaurant, refused com-
ment.

St. closes' its doors

A source within Denny's who did
not want to be named said although
business was good, one of the rea-
sons the restaurant had to close was
because the restaurant was vandalized
every weekend by crowds after the
bars closed. Stalls were reported to
have been torn out of the bathrooms.
In addition, it was hard to get re-
liable employees, the source said.
University students only wanted to
work 10 hours a week and only at
nights; other employees couldn't be

trusted to stay on for more than a
week.
Denny's opened last April. Before
that, the space was occupied by the
Pantree Restaurant and then by
Night Town. Pantree closed in late
1987, a few months after it had been
boycotted by the Lesbian and Gay
Rights Organizing Committee
(LaGROC) for failing to stop five
men from harassing a group of gay
men and lesbian customers.

764-0553 News 763-0379 Arts
764-0562 News and Opinion
77-3334 News .763-0376 Sports
73-2459 News 747-3336 Sports

Faculty proposes new award to regents

.,

by Kristine LaLonde
Daily Administration Reporter
One University professor spends a good deal
of time working with inner-city children teaching
them about lab work.
Another works for the United Nations devel-
oping world-wide environmental plans.
Much of the work University professors do
falls not under the heading of research or teach-

ing, instead the professors use their expertise to
serve the public. To award that service, the fac-
ulty's Senate Advisory Committee on University
Affairs proposed a public service award to the
University Board of Regents at the board's
monthly meeting yesterday.
Regent Thomas Roach (D-Saline) - who
originally made the proposal to develop the award
two years ago - said the University has three

missions: research, teaching, and service.
"We said service was important but no one
was recognizing it," he said.
If approved by the regents, the award would be
divided into three categories: state and local, na-
tional, and international. No more than thre'e
awards would be given annually. The honor
would grant a monetary award of about $1000.

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I

Long-term contraception vaccine
found effective in tests on mice

- - _1 .. ... _... -. . .. ..

1 W. Stadium
ne 769-5722

1. f

WASHINGTON (AP) - A vac-
cine developed using genetic engi-
,eering techniques produces long-
term contraception in female mice,
but use of a similar vaccine to pro-
vide birth control for women is
probably at least a decade away, re-
searchers reported yesterday.
The contraceptive vaccine works
by preventing fertilization of eggs
by sperm, rather than by interfering
with development of the fetus after
conception or inducing abortions.
Findings from the research, car-
ried out by scientists at the national
Institutes of Health, were published
in Science, the journal of the Ameri-
can Association for the Advancement
of Science.
4 Asked how long it will before the

work may lead to development of a that it has potential application

hu
ScE
Cx
sp

iman contraceptive vaccine, re- probably in veterinary medicine and
archer Jurrien Deer said, "Well in agriculture. But our main hope, as
cess of a decade, but that's just a basic scientists, is that these studies
eculation." will stimulate investigations into
these types of immunologically
In the meantime, he said, "I think based contraceptive agents."

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