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November 17, 1989 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-17

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Senior
faculty
*decry
salaries
by Noah Finkel
Daily Administration Reporter
Full professors at the University
receive lower salaries than associate
and assistant professors at "peer" in-
stitutions; according to Public
Health Professor Roy Penchansky,
chair of the Committee on the Eco-
nomic Status of the Faculty.
Penchansky presented the com-
mittee's bi-annual report to the Uni-
versity Board of Regents at their
monthly meeting yesterday.
Among the 18 peer institutions,
ranging from private Ivy League
schools to public Big Ten universi-
ties such as Wisconsin and Illinois,
salaries of University assistant and
associate professors rank fifth, but
the University's full professors rank
only 12th.
The University is in danger of
losing its current numbers and qual-
ity of faculty unless the senior fac-
plty is better compensated.
According to the report, the rea-
son for the relatively low pay for
professors is that with shortages
both in budgets and the pool of fac-
ulty, universities spend less on older
faculty who are less likely to leave,
and more on younger faculty who
may be drawn by better offers to
other schools or vocations.
The problem is particularly acute
at Michigan and may be worsening,
Penchansky said, because professors
here earn less relative to their coun-
terparts at peer schools.
University of Michigan assistant
professors make five percent less
than those at Harvard, the top peer
school, the associates 11 percent
less, and the professors 21 percent
less.
Often, the report said, younger
associate and assistant professors are
paid more than full professors.
"There are four departments where
the median salary for the associate
professors is higher than the median
for the professors.
"We seem to be violating the
principle that if two employees per-
form similar tasks, the one with the
more tenure should be paid more,"
Penchansky said.
According to the report, a
"loyalty tax" exists for faculty to
stay employed with one institution:
those who are young, and more mo-
bile, can command higher salaries
and those who leave one college for
another are usually hired with higher
salaries as incentive to switch
schools.
NOBODYLIKES YOU?
We're here to heip.
It's a new Write: Help Mel
advice c/o Michigan Daily
column in 420 Maynard
the Daily. Ann Arbor, MI 48109

The Michigan Daily- Friday, November 17,1989- Page 3
Tenants move
to arbitrate

AP Photo

Tornado sweeps through Alabama
HUNTSVILLE, Alabama - An aerial view shows the destruction to an apartment complex yesterday morning
after a tornado swept through the Huntsville area without warning Wednesday afternoon, killing at least 17
and injuring over 450 people. No bodies were believed to be left in the rubble, but portions of the city resembled
a bombing target. A shopping center and clusters of apartment buildings were leveled. Cars were piled atop
each each other and utility poles were snapped like twigs. The storm system that struck Huntsville - a
violent clash of unusually warm and cold air - continued its march northward yesterday, sweeping through
South Carolina, North Carolina, New Jersey, and West Virginia.
'U' nears goal for reduction
of out-of-state stuet

housing
by Heather Fee
"It was 6:30 and I had a class at
7:00. I was trying to cook dinner...
with no water I couldn't really
cook," said LSA senior Jeanne
Wiemer, resident of 911 S. Forest.
Wiemer and other residents of the
apartment building are witholding
their rent and have complained that
their heat and water were turned off
for repairs at odd hours and for long
periods of time. They said that the
maintenance crew came in unexpect-
edly to fix things and the landlord
oversold parking by two spaces.
"They were basically inconve-
niences that should have been taken
care of but weren't," said Resident
Manager Engineering senior Bill
Edwards.
Tenants organized meetings
within the building, and a majority
of the building's residents signed a
petition listing these and other com-
plaints. In addition, landlord Judy
Zwas said, "three apartments and two
singles withheld rent."
Both residents withholding rent
and the landlord are eager to arbitrate.
"We have every hope that things
will be resolved reasonably at Tues-
day'smediation meeting," said one
of the residents withholding rent,
who wished not to be named until
after the arbitration.
The two biggest complaints of
the residents were lack of heat and
lack of privacy. On October 16, resi-
dents said the heat was turned down
very low. "A couple times in Octo-
ber we didn't have heat at all in the
apartment," Weimer said. "It was re-
ally freezing."
Referring to the cold apartments,
Resident Manager Edwards said
workers fixing pipes in the boiler
room had turned down the heat to
avoid burning themselves, and then
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dispute
left without turning it back up.
Zwas, on the other hand, said the
heat was already set at a low temper-
ature because it was a warm day and
that the workers were merely
"repairing a small area of drywall
that needed to be repaired."
Residents said some repairs have
been made, but other problems still
persist.
Residents also complained that
maintenance workers came in unan-
nounced to do repairs. "They come
in at weird hours... They should no-
tify us by phone or give us more no-
tice. We would like to know who
comes in and when," said Wiemer.
"When the tenant calls in a
complaint," said Zwas, "we ask
them on the phone 'Is it all right to
come in and do repairs?' If they say
yes, this constitutes permission for
us to come in and do repairs."
Edwards said he experienced a
similar problem in the apartment he
was renting last year, which was
owned by a different landlord. "If (the
residents of his former apartment
building) don't specify, maintenance
people assume they have the right to
come in."
Zwas sent a Notice to Quit on
Tuesday November 14 to all resi-
dents who withheld the rent payment
due on November 1.
Zwas said she doesn't plan to
evict but instead initiated arbitration
which will take place next Tuesday,
Nov. 21.

by Noelle Vance
Daily Government Reporter
Two years after agreeing to reduce
its out-of-state undergraduate enroll-
ment, the University is within one
percentage point of reaching its goal
of a 30/70 ratio of non-resident to
resident students.
There are 7177 out-of-state stu-
dents - 30.8 percent of the student
body - enrolled at the University
this fall, according to a report issued
by the Office of the Registrar. Total
undergraduate fall enrollment is
23,156.
The figure brings the University
closer to realizing an agreement
made with the state in 1987 which
mandates that at least 70 percent of
the undergraduate student population
be Michigan residents.
University officials and state leg-
islators made the agreement when
some Michigan residents became
concerned that Michigan students
were being turned away from the
University in favor of out-of-state
students, who pay more tuition.
Last year, out-of-state students
accounted for 31.4 percent of student
enrollment, and in 1987 the figure
was 31.3 percent.
The University did not adopt an
official policy to reduce the enroll-
ment.

But, explained University Direc-
tor of Communications Keith
Molin, "We're sensitive to what our
mix and balance is. There is an em-
phasis on recruitment of resident sta-
tus students. We want as broad a
range of students as we can find...
but not at the expense of in-state
students."
The University has not imple-
mented any new programs to deter
out-of-state students from enrolling,
said Richard Shaw, director of Uni-
versity admissions. Instead, the of-
fice has turned its efforts to increas-
ing in-state recruitment.

Out-of-state students do, how-
ever, face tougher admissions re-
quirements to some schools and pay
a higher tuition rate.
No other Michigan schools have
out-of-state/in-state enrollment
agreements with the state. A survey
conducted in September by the Mar-
keting, Resource Group, Inc. of
Lansing found that 41 percent of
Michigan respondents felt the Uni-
versity should not be forced to reduce
its out-of-state enrollment.
Michigan State University has
the second highest rate of out-of-
state enrollment after Michigan in
the state.

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