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November 09, 1989 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 12-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 9, 1989
EVANS

continued from page 9
That part of the country was Detroit. When
Evans was a freckle-faced 14, he moved out with
his mother to the Midwest and attended
Birmingham-Seaholm.
While the move helped advance Evans'
hockey career, it also put a strain on his family
because his parents were separated by three thou-
sand miles.
"My mom moved out with me for parental
guidance and helped me out a lot through some
tough times," an appreciative Evans said. "I have
to thank my family for the huge sacrifices they
made for me. If not for them, I'd still be in Cali-
fornia."
At first, Evans found it difficult to compete
because of the huge difference in talent between
hockey in the Midwest and in the West Coast.
He could barely make most of the teams due to

his limited background.
Evans steadily improved and played different
levels of hockey for the Compuware organiza-
tion, playing with Michigan goalie Tim Keough
during his final year of junior hockey.
Michigan coach Red Berenson knew of Evans'
past hockey training and was impressed.
"Considering his background, he's done really
well. He's always been the youngest player on
his teams, jumping from level to level," Beren-
son said.
In his first year at Michigan, Evans started off
shaky but Berenson calmed him down by team-
ing him up with veteran defenseman Alex
Roberts.
"I really enjoy playing with Alex. We work
well together and I've learned a great deal from
him," Evans said. "We talk after each game and
tell each other what we've done right or wrong.

Last year I was inconsistent but he's rubbed off
on me."
What's also contributed to Evans' increasing
success is his easy-going attitude and positive
work ethic. "His overall attitude is that he's ready
to work' Berenson said. "He gives it his best
shot and wants to improve more as a player."
Because of his attitude, Evans is one of the
Michigan players who keeps everything jovial in
the lockerroom, a role which he cherishes.
"It's a tough role. I like to keep everyone
loose and because of that, it's hard to be re-
spected," Evans said. "But I don't mind and don't
care as long as I keep a positive outlook."
But when all is said and done, Evans is unde-
cided about his roots. "I've still got a little bit of
California in me, but I like being out here," said
the transplanted hockey player. "I like being
both."

TV STARS
Continued from page 10
more of a personality show, which
is what I always wanted to do with
the show. We are committed as a
football show to airing the high-
lights and the scouting reports, but I
take great pride in the features we've
run. We have taken it upon our-
selves to be more than a coach's
show. When the issues are there to
be discussed, we will tackle those
issues."
Schembechler adds: "I get in
philosophical issues on college
football. I get to say 'this is what I
believe' on many important issues.

We don't avoid too many issues. It's
kind of a platform for me, and I
think that's good."
Lipson feels that Schembechler's
improvement comes from an attitude
change toward the media that may
have developed from the show's'
success.
"He knows now that rather than
making an enemy of the media, he
knows how to make the media an
ally," Lipson said. "He doesn't say
everything the media would always
like him to say, but he also knows
the media is a very powerful tool."
Michigan Replay airs every
Sunday morning, at 11:30 on
Channel 2 in Detroit.

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