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November 08, 1989 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-08

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Page 10-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, November 8, 1989

REPLAY
Continued from Page 9
director Ann Wright. "It's a very
strong vehicle for us to reach men
ard the educated upper income,
making like $25,000 plus."
The show also functions as a
perfect lead in for Channel 2's
Sunday football coverage, especially
when competing with news pro-
grams like This Week with David
Brinkley. Running in between The
George Perles Show and The De-
troit Lions Today, Michigan Replay
is an appetizer, before CBS serves
up its main course The NFL Today.
"We gave the program a time
when the target audience was most
available," said Channel 2 Director

of Broadcast Operations Jeff Fores-
ter. "Being able to run it in between
the other coaches' shows, in the
rocking chair position, is a fantastic
position to run in. It's done very
well for us there."
Although the show began with
small aspirations, Channel 2 looks
for Michigan Replay to produce big
gains in the run for ratings. Their
high expectations come from the
ever-growing respect for Schem-
bechler. If one man, other than
columnist Mitch Albom, in America
has been able to showcase Schem-
bechler's appeal, it is Lipson.
"Bo is probably the most well-
known coach in the country, cer-
tainly the most dynamic, and we
market the hell out of that," said

Lipson. "He's very marketable, to
the point where we have to turn
down speaking engagements and
product endorsements for him."
As Schembechler's persona has
grown, his attachment for Lipson
has become stronger. The producer
now handles many of his other
business engagements as well.
"He's my agent, non-paid. The
reason being ishthat I get paid so
ittle from him that he has to be my
agent free of charge," said Schem-
bechler.
Lipson responds asking "to be
known as his representative. (This
arrangement) came about because
Schembechler was selling himself
short. I thought some people were
taking advantage of him. There were

companies and organizations that
were marketing him, using him, and
paying him nothing or next to
nothing for that. I have now taken
over that aspect."
Besides the finances, Lipson's
work has some impact on Schem-
bechler's football success as well.
"(The show) is an important
recruiting tool," Schembechler said.
"It allows me to present the message
of Michigan football and what it's
like for guys who play it."
While both men note the im-
portance thatthe showhas had to
Schembechler's success, it is not as
easy to find out how much the show
has contributed to his financial well-
being. Lipson guards that figure, and
defends the system that allows for

zoaches' shows to cover such a large
percentage of coaches' contracts.
"The reason (coaching shows
have) become part of contracts is
that coaches demand very high
salaries," Lipson said. "They are
very visible figures. Is it right or
wrong? I'm not in the morals bus-
iness to make that kind of decision.
It is a reality, and good coaches are
hard to come by, they go to the
highest bidder. It has become a basis
of contracts, that a TV show be part
of contract. I don't know if that's
right or wrong, I don't care.
"You cannot pay the kind of
money needed to get a top football
coach on a straight salary. You have
to have other means. In defense,
remember that college professors
make more money than their base

salary if they are successful. They
write, they speak, they belong to
boards, they do a lot of things to
enhance their income. But when you
see comparisons you say 'well the
coach makes a certain number with
all his side perks, whereas the pro-
fessor makes something signifi-
cantly less, but they only put down
his base salary from the University.'
I have a problem with the double
standard."
Tomorrow-How Michigan
Replay is made- a night on the set
with Bo.
Express yourself
In Daily Arts
Call 763-0379

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