100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 3, 1989 - Page 5
Missing magazine pages? A
fellow student may have them

by Keith Weinbaum
You have this big term paper on
comparative Greek literature due next
week.
You need periodical sources, so
you head for one of the campus li-
braries. After searching for several
articles, you realize many of them
are torn out.
If you are one of the 5,000 to
8,000 daily library users, this may
be an all-too-common occurrence.
Barbara McAdam, head of the
Undergraduate Library, said mutila-
tion of library materials is a problem
in all campus libraries. Because so
many people use the libraries every
day, the periodicals often suffer dam-
age.
"(Mutilation) is an outrage," said
first-year LSA student Brian New-
combe. "This defacing of library ma-
terial displays a negative image of
our school, and should be halted at
any cost."
To combat the problem,
McAdam said the libraries may be-
gin a public education campaign on
mutilation and use more microfilm
and computer databases.
Microfilm machines are steadily
becoming the main source for peri-
odical literature. But, McAdam said,
"Microfilm can never replace the real
magazine. Most students know that
microfilm is not a friendly process

and the equipment is not very reli-
able at times, though it is improv-
ing."
Database, she said, is probably
the most efficient way to preserve
periodicals.
"There are databases already avail-
able," she said. "It is not a cost-ef-
fective way as of yet, but we want to
explore all sorts of options."

and the use of steroids in sports.
The temptation to tear pages out
of magazines is often hard to sup-
press. Joel Topcik, a first-year LSA
student, said, "I don't condone it by
any means as a regular practice, but I
can't say that I or my friends have
never engaged in it."
First-year LSA student Eddie
Honos said, "I'm not saying that I

'I'm not saying that I like ripping out
periodicals, but when you have two midterms
the next day and a term paper due that same
week, you do what you got to do.'
-First-year LSA student Eddie Honos

,KENNETH SMOLLERI Daii,

The UGLi management is cur-
rently studying the extent to which
mutilated materials are a problem. In
1984, there were 680 individual
pages torn out of the journals and
magazines, McAdam said, "The
problem is a cumulative problem...
and it is severe," she said. "It only
takes one student to ruin it for 1,000
students."
The problem is so severe, she
said, that librarians may discourage a
student from researching well-known
"mutilated" subjects such as anorexia

Snackin' and studyin'
LSA first-year students Maureen Bolon (left) and Aimee Cummingham enjoy ice cream on the Diag.
Blanchard makes Peal JimnPniewozik Every]
cuts in fuel funding Week en

like ripping out periodicals, but
when you have two midterms th6
next day and a term paper due that
same week, you do what you got to
do."

LANSING (AP) - At least
5,000 people counting on fuel assis-
tance won't get it this year due to
Gov. James Blanchard's cuts in the
welfare budget, and one lawmaker
proposed a bonfire on the governor's
lawn for people without heat this
winter.
The $1 million reduction in the
Targeted Fuel Assistance program
would cut in half the number of
people who get assistance from the
state to pay their heating bills. Last

year, 11,500 households received
annual allowances of $200.
The cut is part of the $46 million
Blanchard's office plans to trim from
the $2.2 billion Department of So-
cial Services budget due to antici-
pated shortfalls in revenue to cover
promised programs this fiscal year,
which began Oct. 1.
"The people who are proposing
this should be without fuel for
awhile and see how it feels," said
Rep. Charlie Harrison (D-Pontiac).

Summer Leadership

Opportunities

I

CRITICS PRIZE
"" '''II'I""

as
a Summer Orientation Leader
* GAIN CAREER-RELATED SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE
* SUPPORT CHANGE ON CAMPUS
* MEET AND WORK WITH OTHER CAMPUS LEADERS
* FULL TIME SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
* PAID ROOM AND BOARD

Express yourself
in Daily Arts
Call 763 0379
Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Church Chaplaincy)
218 N. Division (at Catherine)
Sunday Schedule
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m.
in St. Andrews
Preacher: The Rev. Susan McGarry
Celebrant: The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock
Supper-6:00 p.m.
Program-7:00 p.m.
Call 665-0606
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest at Hill Street
Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Worship at 7:30 p.m.
Intern: Andy Rutrough, 668-7622
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Friday, Fellowhip, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday Bible Study, 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.
1511 Washtenaw, 668-5560
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletcher, parking on Ann St.
SUNDAY: Community Worship, 10:30 a.m.
SUN EVE: Fellowship & dinner, 6:15 p.m.
Questions/Info .. . 662-3154, mornings

4

i

Departments, Faculty, Staff and Students of
University of Michigan:
Information Technology Service Center
is your ON CAMPUS authorized
computer repair facility
535 W. William St. 763-5897
M-F 8-4:30

CONSIDER ORIENTATION

- C'ONSIDER YOUR FUTURE'

SAT. at MIDNIGHT
SUN. at 9:15 PM
603 East Libertv 668-8392_

Applications available at 3000 Michigan Union, at your
residence hall front desk, and the
Campus Information Center
APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO NOVEMBER 6, 1989
AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION NON-DISCRIMINATORY EMPLOYER

I

Featuring: SELF

I

POCO
AA M legacy -
®L features:
~Call It Love jNothin' To Hide
ho Else

i

INDIGO GIRLS
including:
e' Closer To Fine/Secure Yourself
Kid Fears/Tried To Be True
Love's Recovery

i

V Cass.
12 9D

W4
Enter our Pink Says
Thinks' sweepstakes
tt; h today. Grand Prize
package includes: a
New Wurlitzer'
Jukebox filled with
100 top 45s, $4,500
Education Fund and
a 4'/s foot Plush Pink
Panther. Runner-Up
Prizes (2) includes: $450 cash towards a Pink
Says Thinks"Party and a 4/2 foot Plush Pink
Panther. Complete details instore.

STORE WIDE SAVINGS
Maxell UR Normal Bias 5-PK 90 Minute Cassettes .....5.99
Design 2000 3-Drawer Audio Cassette Unit ............ 7.99
Design 2000 3-Drawer CD Storage Unit ............... 9.99
Design 2000 2-Drawer Video Cassette Unit ............ 9.99
Trex Earbuds BH200 or Headphones BH400......7.99 Ea.
Sony Stereo Headphones MDR-005V ................. 9.99
Scotch Multi-Pak Video Cassettes 2-EG & 1-EG+....... 10.99
ALS Washed Nylon CD Carry Case Holds 16 ........... 11.99
Napa Valley Cassette Wall Rack Holds 36..............9.99
Case Logic CD Storage Case Holds 30 ............... 14.99
Sony Twin Turbo Stereo Headphones MDR-E434........ 16.99
O'Sullivan 3-Shelf Video Storage Rack............... 24.99
AIWA AM/FM Cass. with Super Bass HS-T210 ......... 49.99

doinn.nt nnnnnlo

jl

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan