100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1989 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPINION,
0 A fair trial in England?

:{?.i::":i } :{{.:i:q::{k:i{{v: ...".:-: Yi S:::::'--4-i-ii:":v::":::^ :": i:ti-: i:vi::":'"i:4: vK {+k .'-0 - ...: '::.tit"{'-.:{:{::.:i:::::::::::.1 ::::.:i{:{4::.}::i.:iv vti:{{4ii}:.}:.:::v: i:i.\i:: \:: .
vN + ...
:" ....Ai-. -.::5?. ... .. .. :n . . \ . ..:.-.{-:ti : :: ........._ 4 _ vy:::viiii*'n'vv ::::i .. . ::..:., h ..... {v ::............ ... .. .. .... ...:.:.."4.ti .,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .I.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .'

4

ARTS

7

SPORTS

10

Got a play right here...

M Icers prepare for Bowling Green
.. ;:t - ttit4. 1 .,';. 44'4..4.\.\'j~vz'..,a t;;:\\\" \\ y .'' " 4

Ninety-nine years of editorial freedom
Vol. C, No. 42 Ann Arbor, Michigan -Thursday, November 2, 1989

Iran ok's
arrest of
an U.s.
citizens
NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) - Yes-
tdrday Iran's Council of Guardians,
the country's constitutional watch-
dog, approved a law giving it the
power to arrest Americans anywhere
and put them on trial.
The action came amid growing
anti-U.S. passion being whipped up
to mark the 10th anniversary of the
storming of the U.S. Embassy in
Tehran. Protesters plan to burn 160
flags outside the compound on
Saturday.
The law will remain on the
books "as long as the U.S. president
is authorized to commit inhuman
practices against the lives and inter-
ests of Iranian citizens," the agency
reported in a dispatch monitored in
Cyprus.
The Iranian move was in re-
sponse to the Justice Department's
authorization of the FBI to arrest
suspected terrorists abroad and bring
them to trial in the United States
without the permission of the coun-
* tries where they were located.
Some Iranian people clearly saw
the Justice Department's action as
aimed at the Islamic republic.
See IRAN, page 5

Michigamua,

MAC

reach

compromise

by Josh Mitnick i
Daily MSA Reporter
Michigamua, a campus all-male
honor society, has agreed to elimi-
nate all references to Native Ameri-
can culture from their initiation ritu-
als.
Representatives from the Michi-
gan Student Assembly's Minority
Affairs Commission (MAC) and
Michigamua reached the accord early
yesterday morning, beating today's
final deadline which was extended by
MAC last week. MAC was planning
to take the case before the Michigan
Civil Rights Board if an agreement
was not reached.
Michigan hockey goalie Warren
Sharples, the Michigamua president,
said the group would sever all ties to
Native American culture and would
restructure its rituals based solely on
University-based traditions.
He said abandoning the old prac-
tices wouldn't seriously affect the
group: "The rituals weren't what
made Michigamua the honor that it
is. The primary function of
Michigamua is to serve the Univer-
sity."

MAC chair Delro Harris said he
was extremely pleased with the
agreement, adding that the accord ful-
filled the goals that his group had
been actively pursuing.
"Wherever there's a conflict,
(MAC's) goal is to create something
positive out of the situation," Harris
said.
Michigamua and MAC have been
involved in periodic negotiations
since the spring of 1988 when Na-
tive American student groups
restated charges that Michigamua's
rituals were a mockery of their cul-
ture.
A Civil Rights ruling in 1973,
stemming from student complaints,
ordered Michigamua to "eliminate all
public rites on campus" because it
was practiced "unlawful discrimina-
tion" against Native Americans.
Last April, MAC was ready to
file a complaint with the Michigan
Civil Rights Commission against
Michigamua, alleging the group had
again violated the '73 ruling. The
commission decided, however, to
pursue the dispute under the Univer-
See MAC, page 5

Leaves of grass SAMANTHA SANDERS/Daily
Who needs a pillow or matress when the ground is covered with thousands of leaves? Not Alexa Eldred. Alexa,
an LSA senior, reads in a pile of leaves in the diag.

Engineering grant
By Marion Davis "It sends the message that the University M
SMinority Issues Reporter and the state of Michigan are genuinely (N
The state's Office of Equity has renewed a concerned about retention of minority m
grant to the College of Engineering to be students," Mathes said. "The goals of the Er
used to increase the number of minority grant are directly in line with the mission of D
students receiving engineering degrees. our organization - (minority) recruitment,
Funds coming from the state's Select retention, and successful graduation."

aims at minority retention

Student Support Services (4S) Program are
being matched by funding from the College
of Engineering, General Motors, and General
Electric.
"I'm extremely excited about the grant,"
*said Craig Mathes, an engineering senior and
president of the University Society of
Minority Engineering Students.

The College of Engineering will receive
$119,750 and was one of 16 other Michigan
schools to receive grants from the 4S
Program.

fo
sus
in
co
si
m

ichigan Mandate, which aims to make
Michigan) a model of a pluralistic and
ulticultural university," said Minority
ngineering Program (MEPO) director
errick Scott.
Scott said the grant has provided a way
r MEPO to expand its program initiatives,
ich as scholarship dollars, study groups,
formation on summer jobs, and free
unseling.
"I've been able to do a far more
gnificant monitoring (of the progress of
inority engineering students)," Scott said

referring to an increase in coordination of
resources beyond the College of
Engineering.
The grant also enables MEPO to obtain a
counselor who will serve a dual role. Not
only will the money permit counseling of
MEPO students but also of students in the
Comprehensive Studies Program, a minority
support group composed of students who
may transfer into the College of
Engineering.
Since receiving the grant, MEPO has
doubled the amount of students participating
in its Professionals In Training Program

(PTP), a pre-enrollment orientation designed
to give minority engineering students a first-
hand look at being an engineering student.
Stressing the importance of 'such
programs, Scott pointed out that "students
who participate in PTP have a 10 to 15
percent higher rate of retention than those
who don't."
Although fall enrollment of minority
students in the College of Engineering is up
to 319 from last fall's 265, Scott pointed
out that the increase is not soley an increase
in first-year students, but rather "the
college's retention of minority students."

"The 4S Program is an
University President James

integral part of
J. Duderstadt's

Group
builds
*waste
pyramid
by Joanna Brodler

Game Show promises big bucks

by Ross Tanzer
No, it isn't Candid Camera, but there's
sure to be a lot of surprises tonight in the
first game show to ever focus on Ann Ar-
bor and the University.
It's the Campus Camera Game Show, a
new way for students to win fast money.
The University Activities Center (UAC)
will be hosting the show at 7 p.m. in the
Michigan Union Ballroom.
As its logo states, everyone who attends

has a chance to play, and everyone has a
chance to win. Admission is free, and the
first 100 potential contestants to arrive will
win door prizes.
Cash will be awarded to winning contes-
tants, randomly selected by host Howard
Stevens (star ofWho's the Boss and Star
Trek) to take part in four rounds of play.
Finalists from each round will compete in
the end with the chance to win grand prizes.
Caroline Greenberg, UAC's committee

chair for special events, explained that stu-
dents were videotaped this past Monday and
asked questions regarding campus hot-spots
and the best and worst of Ann Arbor.
"Tonight's contestants will have to match
answers to these questions with those peo-
ple who have been videotaped," she said.
General Foods International Coffees is
sponsoring the show as a campaign strat-
egy for marketing their new Double Dutch
flavored coffee. See GAME, page 2

Walking through the Diag yester-
day afternoon, students and passer- R ..
bys were met with an angular, wood .
and barbed-wire sculpture filled with .
styrofoam containers, newspapers, -ENNIFER DUNETZ/Daily
potato chip packages, and paper Chris Smith, an LSA sophomore, throws trash into a
cups. pyramid in the diag as part of preparations for Earth Day.
The sculpture, labelled "The Pyramid of stage before Earth Day, April 22, a day in
Waste," was erected by Earth Day Organizing which environmentalists nationwide will rec-
Committee members Tim Carpenter and ognize and consider issues such as waste con-
Richard Scott Ward to promote public concern trol, pollution, and the Green House Effect. In
for environmental problems. addition, the committee plans to devote the
"We're trying to get the public aware of first week of April to further promote such
how much unbiodegradable and unprocessable topics.
*tuff they produce," said Carpenter, a sopho- Nicknamed "Country," Ward hopes to
more in the School of Natural Resources. change many students apathetic attitudes to-
Yesterday's demonstration was only one ward the environment through his activism.
among a series that the committee hopes to The LSA senior pointed to the general lack of

See TRASH, page 2

House passes bill to increase
minimum wage to $4.25 by '91

WASHINGTON (AP) - The House voted

and two successive Republican

5'- -

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan