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November 01, 1989 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-11-01

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 1, 1989 - Page 11

DoesThom son Ing views : the sp tina 'views ethe"q
Does Thompson a rIyp\t5 Baseball in the
____SU_ S_ believe in miracles? r S ,
by Jeff ShoranrpoIingTMcvvrsawhfllPoownedigwViithVOs.a lookback
Illh n rt ..grinrTug McGraw followed suit with his ' e San rin akem i w .zs v hi \ v'% vies

uauy sports writer

Winning isn't everything. But
don't tell that to Tarnisha Thomp-
son.
On Friday night, she emulated
Carlton Fisk, Jim Craig, and other
athletes whose unadulterated joy has
left its mark on sports fans every-
where.
The Michigan volleyball team
won its first Big Ten match of the
season on that 'Good' Friday, and
Thompson's look said it all.
At the conclusion of the match,
when the Wolverines had officially
upset a previously 8-1 Minnesota
team, the first-year setter threw up
her arms in jubilation, and conveyed
to the rest of the world that, simply,
she was happy.
Maybe she was happy because
Michigan overcame the Golden
Gophers, who strutted into Ann
{ Arbor in possession of first place in
the conference. Or maybe it was
because she performed admirably in a
successful effort, during which she
was "shaking the whole game."
Or maybe she was ecstatic that
her team finally found its way into
the 'W' column, something she had
not experienced since high school.
Regardless, she was happy.
The reason why a reaction like
AP TOP

1980 championship leap. Olympic
goalie Jim Craig provided us with
his "Do you believe in miracles?"
smile that same year.
Tarnisha Thompson may not be
on the same scale as the afore-
mentioned athletes, but the feeling is
the same. And while it is with hesi-
tation that the tired clichd is offered,
it suits the moment.
Her look is the stuff dreams are
made of.
When the Michigan basketball
team came home with a national
championship, Bo Schembechler,
perhaps out of character, instantly
proclaimed that a football national
championship wasn't out of the
question. He recognized the joy that
arises from accomplishing a desired
feat, and therefore elevated his goals
from conference to nationwide.
Tarnisha Thompson and the rest
of the Michigan spikers should rem-
ember their winning feeling, because
such emotions are a good impetus
upon which to build a foundation for
success.
No longer must the Wolverines
greet each and every victory with the
enthusiasm of a World Series
Championship. They can now set
higher goals, and save their elation
for when they achieve those goals.

by Jonathan Samnick
Daily Sports Writer
The Oakland Athletics anti-climactic World Series
victory over the San Francisco Giants Saturday night
signaled the end of the most unpredictable decade in
baseball history. The 1980's gave baseball fans all they
could handle and much more.
In 1980, the A's were running around playing Billy
Ball. Now the 80's end the way the 70's began with the
Oakland A's Bash Brothers dominating baseball like
last decade's dynasty that featured Reggie, Rudi, Campy
and Catfish.
As we opened the 80's, George Brett was trying to
become the first man in 40 years to hit .400. Just
missing the mark, he hit .390 and led the Royals to
their first World Series appearance, against the Phila-
delphia Phillies.
Philadelphia and Kansas City were two of 14
different teams to appear in the Series in the decade, and
two of five to appear at least twice (the St. Louis
Cardinals made it three times), with only the Los
Angeles Dodgers winning it all twice.
The 1980's gave us more than our share of
superstars, celebrities and controversial stories. Within
a three-year period in the mid-80's baseball produced
Darryl Strawberry, Don Mattingly, Will Clark, Dwight
Gooden, Roger Clemens, Kirby Puckett, Orel Hershiser
and Jose Canseco - all players who will lead us into
the 1990's.
But the 1980's will be remembered less for the out-
standing achievements of players like Rickey Hend-
erson, who stole 130 bases in one season, or Mat-
tingly's decade-highi45 RBIs in 1985. Baseball's battle
with drugs dominated the headlines with the ever escal-
ating player salaries, looming player strikes and free
agency not far behind.
One of the most intriguing stories has been the rise
of those teams that time forgot. The Cleveland Indians
are now nearing respectability, and the Chicago Cubs,
the affliction of the Windy City, went 40 years without
any titles but captured the National League East crown
in '84 and '89.

Nolan Ryan is still cruising along and that's cruis-
ing with a K. Jose Canseco wields his bat like a tooth-
pick, and Bo Jackson, well...what doesn't he know?
The 1980's are the only decade since the inception
of the live ball not to have a player hit 50 home runls
with Mark McGwire's 49 in his rookie year tops. Paul
Molitor had a 39-game hitting streak, and Dave Stewart
of the champion A's won 20 games three years in a
row, but remains Cy Young-less.
So many stories and so many statistics, but certain
things remain etched in our memories and change the
way we will look at America's pastime from now on.
Bowie Kuhn, the first of the decade's four comn-
issioners will be most remembered for banning legends
as Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays from baseball
because of their ties to casinos. As Kuhn's successor,
Peter Ueberroth's first move was to reinstate Willie and
Mickey, but ironically, he himself was occupied during
his final days in office with Pete Rose's gambling
connections.
Remember the Al Campanis affair? Since that time
baseball has added two Black managers and one Black
President of the National League.
The addition of lights to Wrigley Field in 1988
marked the official transformation to the age of high-
tech. For many, day baseball momentarily moved us
back and kept us in touch with the innocence of our
past.
The tragic death of A. Bartlett Giamatti left a void
in a game usually filled with emotions. He died a week
after banishing Pete Rose from baseball for life.
Recognized as potentially the best commissioner in
history, Giamatti was baseball's resident scholar, phil-
osopher, and greatest supporter.
Like life itself baseball has no time limit and the
unpredictable happens all the time. Perhaps that is our
enchantment with it.
The 1980's leaves us with no clear picture of what
to expect in the next decade. We know, however, that
like death and taxes George Steinbrenner will do the
absurd, some unknown player will exceed his expect-
ations and spring training is only 120 days away.

Thompson
Thompson's makes such an impact
is simple. It's rare that one can sit
back and enjoy an elated feeling for
all its positives before something
else comes along and spoils the
moment. When such an opportunity
does present itself, it often affects
more than the person involved.
Fisk gave us his memorable fair
ball call in the 1975 World Series.

25

No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
*6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
*16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
r24.
25.

School
Notre Dame
Colorado
Nebraska
MICHIGAN
Alabama
Florida State
Miami, Fla.
Illinois
Southern Cal.
Tennessee
Arkansas
Auburn
West Virginia
Pittsburgh
Arizona
Penn State
Houston
N. Carolina St.
Florida
Texas A&M
Clemson
Texas
Brigham Young
Virginia
Fresno State

Record
8-0
8-0
8-0
6-1
7-0
6-2
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-1
6-1
5-2
6-1-1
5-1-1
6-2
5-2
5-2
7-1
6-1
6-2
7-2
4-2
6-2
7-2
8-0

Points
1,498
1,432
1,366
1,312
1,260
1,159
1,114
1,083
1,038
927
912
711
694
653
638
525
460
457
449
437
412
286
113
112
91

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18

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GRIDDES
Purdue at Michigan
Navy at Notre Dame
Eastern Carolina at Miami
Nebraska at Colorado
Mississippi St. at Alabama
Illinois at Iowa
South Carolina at Florida St.
Oregon St. at USC
Houston at TCU
Arkansas at Rice
West Virginia at Penn St.
Florida at Auburn
Arizona at California
Oregon at BYU
Virginia at N. Carolina St.
Michigan St. at Indiana
Wisconsin at Minnesota
Ohio St. at Northwestern
Army at Air Force
Edinboro at Slippery Rock

THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

Score of Michigan game:
Michigan
Purdue

*,,New England sacks Tony Eason
The New England Patriots ann- fourth on the Patriots' depth chart at days.
ounced Tuesday that they had quarterback, was released after he Often injured, Eason led the
released quarterback Tony Eason, a refused to take a substantial cut in Patriots to their 1985 Super Bowl
Iormer University of Illinois football pay. Eason had been fourth string appearance. The Patriots lost that
player. behind Steve Grogan, Doug Flutie Super Bowl to the Bears, 46-10.
Eason, who had recently sunk to and Marc Wilson for the past 19 - From Staff Reports

r

-

More than an adventure .. .
- Learn valuable communication skills.
" Build your resume.
" Earn $5.00 to $6.50 per hour.
- Earn bonuses.

KELLOGG
W ,
Opportunities
for Engineers

1 40
. I

-I

- Enjoy flexible ever
Speak with Univet
Call: 9
Stop by: 611
Kichig a
E-x p-e-r i j -en-c-

fling hours.
rsity Alumni.

r'

s a job.
998-7420
Church Street
n Telefuand

The M.W. Kellogg Company, an international
leader in the engineering and construction of pro-
cess facilities for the chemical, petrochemical,
refining, gas processing, fertilizer, and related
industries, is seeking entry-level chemical,
mechanical, civil, and electrical engineers to join
our Houston world headquarters and technol-
ogy center.
At M.W. Kellogg, you'll have the chance to work
with the most advanced technologies available in
the areas of ammonia/urea, methanol, olefins/
ethylene, environmental, organic chemicals, and
catalytic cracking. We're also strong in such
areas as advanced manufacturing technology,
where management information systems, auto-
matic guided vehicles, robotics, and advanced
control technology play an important role in the
facilities we design and build.
Through our Graduate Development Program,
you'll be exposed to multiple projects and disci-
plines. We also have in-house classroom training

computer-aided engineering and design.
M.W. Kellogg's Houston office offers growth
potential that can only be found in a world head-
quarters environment. The city, which is ideal for
people with varied interests, is highly rated for its
cultural centers, professional sporting events,
year-round outdoor activities, and number of res-
taurants and entertainment facilities. Rice Univer-
sity, the University of Houston, and other local
campuses offer easy access for continued edu-
cation. And the cost of living is low.
Kellogg has been a part of many "firsts" in pro-
cess engineering. If you'd like to join in that spirit
of innovation, start your career with M.W. Kellogg.
We will be on campus16 Nov.'89 to answer
questions about opportunities with our organi-
zation. For additional information, send your
resume or a letter of inquiry to our college
recruiting coordinator:
Box 1MWK
4913 Weeping Willow

e

T~h~at "Pa-y~s

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