100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 27, 1989 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 27, 1989 - Page 3

Band's
trip to
ellinois
cancelled
by Jason Carter
If fans traveling to see the
Wolverines play the Fighting Illini
this season want to hear the Michi-
gan Marching Band play "The Vic-
e tors," they'll have to bring along a
cassette version.
The band's trip to the University
of Illinois has been cancelled because
of a lack of funds, Band Director
Jerry Luckhardt said. "There was no
lowering of band morale," Luckhardt
said, "but a few people are disap-
pointed."
He refused to elaborate.
However, there was speculation
*by band members that the
cancellation was more a result of
poor communication between the
University's School of Music and
Athletic Department - the band's
two main sources of funds.
Apparently, both departments
thought the other was going to foot
the bill for the trip, and the band was
pever given the money needed for the
ourney, said band members.
W "The Athletic Department usually
pays for one trip a year. This year
the department gave a budget, which
Was in essence more money, but not
gnough money for the Illinois trip,"
said Julie Vierling, a graduate assis-
tant to the band.
"I think that (the band) really
wanted to go," she added.
"It's gonna hurt that we're not
going to be there," said five-year
band member Jim Kondash. "In big
games we are a factor. The Illinois
game is probably going to be the de-
ciding game of the Big Ten Cham-
pionship."
Kondash, who has traveled with
the band to Champagne twice, said
Illinois fans get very loud at home
games, and the closed nature of the
0 tadium makes it even worse.
He said he was disappointed the
trip was cancelled, but said he won't
miss the foul odor that hovers
around Memorial Stadium.
Jason Nuveman, a second year
member of the band, said there was a
trp cancelled last year.
"In a letter I received before join-
ing the band last year, it was stated
that we were going to Iowa City,"
uveman said. "But the band never
went."

Abortion

consent

vote fires.debate

by Vera Songwe
Daily Minority Issues Reporter
The National Organization for Women, the
College Democrats, Right to Life, and many
others groups have for the past six weeks been
lobbying for or against Michigan's proposed
parental consent bill for teenage abortions.
Pro-Life organizations may have won the
first battle Wednesday as the State Senate
passed the bill by a 29-8 vote. The parental
consent bill is widely considered the most con-
troversial of the abortions bills now being
considered by the Michigan legislature.
The Michigan House of Representatives and
Governor James Blanchard still have to pass
the parental consent bill before it becomes a
law. Blanchard has promised to veto the bill if
it passes the house.
"The bill that passed the senate is unreason-
able and unacceptable," said Tom Scott, Blan-
chard's Press Secretary.
Opponents of the bill feel the state cannot
legislate parent-daughter communication and
should not meddle in such family matters.
"I think (the bill) is horrible, it is very mis-
leading. It seems like (the abortion bills) are
working towards family unity, but you cannot
legislate family communication," said LSA
senior Julie Subrin, a member of the Ann Ar-
bor Coalition to Defend Abortion Rights.
"A teenager needs to talk to somebody who
respects their opinion," Subrin said, adding
that the parental consent bill assumes that the
parents are the best people to talk to in a time
of crisis.
Surbin said many parents are not aware of
the fact that their daughters are sexually active,
so information about an impending pregnancy
will annoy the parents, who then may make

quick, irrational decisions.
Pro-life activists, however, argue that the
parent is the only one who does not have an
interest other than the child's well-being at
hand. The parent, then, is the person best able
to help the child make such a decision.
Subrin disagreed, saying that even parents
have a vested interest in the outcome of a
child's pregnancy. "She could talk to her peers,
a counselor or a minister," said Subrin.
"Why is it that all of sudden everyone
knows what's best for a child better than the
parent?" asked Barbara Listing, president of the
Right to Life of Michigan. She said pro-choice
proponents are afraid of the bill not because
they think parental consent is bad, but because
they think it would limit the number of abor-
tions taking place daily.
But Listing agrees with her opponents that
there is no way a bill can be passed to legislate
family communication. "We would never re-
ally legislate family communication, but what
is terrible in trying to enhance it?"
Many families come together during a pe-
riod of crisis and a pregnancy is one of the
kinds of crisis that can bring families that are
otherwise apart together, Listing said.
The College Democrats also got into the
fight, and travelled to Lansing to argue against
the bill. "We are opposed to the bill, we lob-
bied last week against the bill in Lansing,"
said LSA senior Roger Kosson, the President
of College Democrats.
"Teenagers who can talk to their parents
usually do that," he said. "If the parent is abu-
sive, the teenager has a right not to tell."
Thirty-four other states have laws requiring
parental consent for teenage abortion, and
about half of them are in effect.

Do-Wop
Members of the Friars took the stage yesterday on the steps of the Graduate Library to give
a preview of their upcoming concert.
City Cunci considers
charging for excess trash

by Tara Gruzen
Daily City Reporter
Although the mandatory recycling ordinance
was taken off the Ann Arbor City Council's
agenda earlier this month, the proposal has not
disappeared. City councilmembers are still
considering the benefits of such a program.
Currently under debate is a controversial
variable can rate proposed by Councilmember
Thomas Richardson (R-Fifth Ward).
The variable can rate would charge an extra
cost for people with excess trash who do not
recycle. The cost would be calculated according
to the number of trash cans over an allowed
amount.
Many opponents of Richardson's proposal
claim that it would allow the wealthy to avoid
recycling while making it mandatory for the
poor.
Councilmember Liz Brater (D-Third Ward)
said since the variable can rate would be a
regressive tax, a tax not tied to income, it
could possibly cause problems. "There is an
implication that people can buy their way out
of recycling," she said.
But Richardson said if people have an
income problem, they should talk to the federal
government. He said that everyone's trash
service shouldn't be subsidized because some
people have low incomes.
"If you're worried about people not having

money, give them money," Richardson said.
He has proposed that the city waive the fees
of a variable can rate for low-income housing
co-ops, housing commission projects, and
apartments that qualify under Section Eight of
the the federal housing program. Section Eight
is low-income housing sponsored by Housing
and Urban Development.
Mike Garfield, the environmental issues
director of the Ann Arbor Ecology Center, said
the key is not to look at the variable can rate
as a way to give the city a lot of revenue, but
to use it as a means of limiting the amount of
trash on the curbside.
He said the variable can rate needs to be
instituted alongside a mandatory recycling
program because if it is not, the penalty would
have to be too high to successfully encourage
recycling.
"If the rate is set too high it's a regressive
tax , but if it's set at a reasonable rate everyone
is going to want to pinch pennies as best they
can," Garfield said.
The Ecology Center, which initially called
on the council to make a decision on
mandatory recycling no later than Nov. 6, has
extended this deadline date. Both the center and
the council are waiting for reports from
consultants who are studying the need for
mandatory recycling.

CONFUSED??
Need help with your
FUND RAISER?
(jg %ft.djggu @gi1p
Classifieds' GREEK GAB
can help you
make the MO$T of it!!
764-0557

Choosing A CAREER Raises
Do You Have The Answers?

Various Questions.

9

"o,1/Z Laurence J. LeBlanc, M.A., B.B.A.
'tJ Director/ Career Counselor
£ ~State of Michigan Certified
GREAT LAKES CAREER) DEVELOPMENT CENTER

CLASSIFIED ADSI Call 764-0557
CORRECTION
There is an ERROR in the new U of M
Student Directory.
Intercollegiate Athletics' ONLY phone
number is 747-2583.
663-2411 is the phone number for
TJ4- ne hLDR'$ bA Z nWOOD
a new children's bookshop in the

Van

57esi~o4n..t4
V4C'dC4

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Now Hiring Full Time & Part Time!
*Flexible Hours " Competitive Salary*
*Cash Tips Daily e Free Parking 9

,F
DOM

A COMPREHENSIVE CAREERR COUNSELING SERVICE

__

" Personality, Values & Interests Assessment
" Individualized Career Exploration
" Academic Program Development
" Graduate School Selections
" Preparation for Competitive Job Market
Free Initial Telephone Consultation 769-8440

1(

IDEAL FOR STUDENTS!
*PART TIME CLERICAL*
*RETAIL CLERKS * CAKE DECORATORS*
2111 Packard 668-6058
300 S. Main 761-7532

Nickles Arcade, opening Nov.

I1St.

i

'rp
4 , Pa

..
I
t

)fip~jII3f RESTAURANT
"24 YEARS EXPERIENCE"
CHEF JAN
TOP GOLD MEDAL WINNER
OF DETROIT COBO HALL NATIONAL CONTEST
Sponsored by Michigan Restaurant Association
Michigan Chefs De Cuisine Association
BLUE RIBBON BEST CHEF AWARD
IN WASHINGTON D.C.
- m - ---- ----

~~~~N3UPI
.. spus HEMCiA No

--NNW&

. "F' k a K

,..-x

Moscow University, Russian Hard Rock

As the world gets smaller, opportunity
gets larger with the IIT MBA.
Technology is at the heart of America's competitiveness. This helps explain why
many fT educated managers reach top management positions fast.
Implement innovation with the IIT Full-Time MBA.
Toffersuniquely focused specializations in: Operations and Technology

10%

- -

with coupon

Dinner only

m r expires 10/31/89
-----a---------------
Szechuan-Hunan-Peking

I

Cafe, Batman, Ann Arbor Polo Club,
M.C. Escher Designs, Dick & Jane

DINE IN OR

in

11

I

I

L

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan