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October 19, 1989 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-19

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.~

Doctor and lawyer
debate blood supply

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 19, 1989 - Page 5
DNR director
addresses ecology
and the future

by Ken Walker

The director of the University
Hospital's Blood Bank and Transfu-
sion Service said yesterday afternoon
that increasing the safety of the na-
tion's surplus blood could further de-
crease the blood supply.
In a speech at the Medical
Science II building, Dr. Harold
Oberman said adding more screening
tests will limit the number of
acceptable blood donors. Currently,
he said, only about 5 percent of the
1.S. population donates blood.
"If you are in an auto accident,
and you need a couple hundred units
of blood real quick, then perhaps the
supply of blood is more important
(than the safety)," he said. "And if
you develop hepatitis afterwards,
that's perhaps the price you pay,
although that price may be exacted
in court at a later date against the
doctor."
Dr. Oberman's speech,
"Increasing the Safety of our Blood
Supply: What Are the Costs?" was
sponsored by the Program in Human
Values in Medicine.
Dr. Oberman elaborated on his

belief that society must accept a rea-
sonable risk when accepting blood
transfusions. Because unsafe blood is
discarded and donors are excluded, a
perfectly safe blood supply is expen-
sive and hard to maintain, he said.
During yesterday's forum on the
issue, Medical Center Attorney Ed-
ward Goldman gave the opposing
viewpoint. Goldman said, "The
courts say that if technology or in-
formation is available for use in the
screening of blood, it should be
used."
Goldman said a hospital could
not expect to defend a position on
blood testing based upon the costs of
testing.
He said for the hospital to defend
itself in court, the jury must be con-
vinced that everything done to ensure
the safety of the blood for the trans-
fusion recipient.
Goldman said the policy of most
hospitals concerning the safety of
the blood supply was governed
strictly by the latest court decisions
on the subject.

by Daniel Poux
Moving into the 1990s, it is ob-
vious that concern for the environ-
ment will play an increasingly im-
portant role in political elections on
all levels.
It seems fitting then that David
Hales, director of the Michigan De-
partment of Natural Resources,
would address these issues in his
speech in the Michigan Union's An-
derson Room last evening.
Hales, who was a professor in the
School of Natural Resources before
becoming DNR Director in May
1988, was scheduled to discuss the
environment, the United Nations,
and global security interests. How-
ever, he was quick to point out that,
in his position, issues of national
and international security interests
have little to do with him.
Instead, he made several analogies
between the DNR's response to
problems on the state level and how
those philosophies could be used for
national and international environ-
mental controversies.
The speech was sponsored by the
local chapter of the United Nations
Association in honor of the group's
42nd anniversary.
The key to solving environmen-
tal controversies is coordinating the
many different goals for a workable

compromise, Hales said. When look-
ing at complex environmental is-
sues, he said, it is important to real-
ize there are no "problems" -- only
conflicting opinions.
He said government officials
must bear in mind that solutions to
today's problems can become tomor-
row's problems. For example, he
cited the nation's overflowing land-
fills and health hazards from pesti-
cide use.
However, Hales pointed out that
some environmental news is encour-
aging. Air quality in this state, he
said, has improved drastically. "Ten
years ago, half the state's population
was at some health risk from breath-
ing the air in Michigan," he said.
"Today, almost no one is at risk."
"Governmental decision-making
must attempt to deal with environ-
mental problems from an interactive,
instead of an independent approach,"
Hales said. If we are to survive in an
increasingly complex ecological bal-
ance, this must be the course of ac-
tion, he concluded.
Hales' speech is one of two
events the Ann Arbor chapter of the
United Nations Association is plan-
ning for the U.N.'s anniversary.
The group will host its annual inter-
national dinner and speech a week
from tomorrow.

David Hales speaks about the changing environmental concerns and how
they affect global security interests in the Union last night.

*POLICE
NOTES
Wheelchair riding
Police arrested a man last Tues-
day for rolling down E. Medical
Center Drive in a wheelchair, appar-
ently stolen from the nearby Univer-
sity Hospital, according to police re-
ports.
The man was arrested for possess-
ing stolen property valued at more
than $100. The crime is a felony and
is punishable by fine or imprison-
ment up to four years.
According to the reports, the po-

lice pulled up in a car next to him
and asked where he got the
wheelchair.
The wheelchair rider then pointed
toward the nearby parking structure.
After being read his rights, both
the wheelchair and the rider were
taken to the police station. The
wheelchair was photographed and
filed, while the person was identified
and released.
The rider told police he wanted to
impress his friends and thought it
would be fun if they could see him
in a wheelchair. So, he grabbed the
wheelchair and took off down the
street.
Break-ins
An unknown person entered the
room of two students at Couzens
Hall between 11:30 p.m. Friday and

1:15 a.m Sunday, police reports
said. Authorities said the person en-
tered the room through an unlocked
or open door. A stereo, backpack,
umbrella and keys were reported
stolen.
According to police reports,
:omputer equipment valued at
$1,500 was stolen when an un-
known person pried the screen off a
window and entered into a Bursley
Residence Hall room. The break-in
occurred between 5:35 p.m. Saturday
and 1:15 a.m. Sunday.
A Law Quad resident reported to
police that an unknown person en-
tered his room sometime between
Sunday evening and early Monday
morning. The resident reported his
cassette player and duffel bag were
stolen. - by Sheala Durant

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