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October 18, 1989 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-18

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 18, 1989
A far, far
better
place to
read i

BY ANDREA GACKI
A Tale of Two Cities: Paris and
Cleveland.
The City of Lights... and a city
in Ohio.
Thanks to the Cleveland Council
for World Affairs, Charles Dickens
(as metempsychosis-ed by Bert
Hornback, professor of English and
Dickens scholar) read from A Tale of
Two Cities in Cleveland- this past
summer. The date? None other than
July 14 - the 200th Anniversary of
the French Republic.
While Parisians fled tourists and
the parade in celebration of Bastille
Day, Clevelanders encouraged Dick-
ens to expand his repertoire.
Although he's legendary for his A
Christmas Carol readings at yuletide,
lesser known performances have in-
cluded a shortened Great Expecta-
tions and a David Copperfield that
"just didn't work." But now there's
Madame Defarge to counterbalance
Tiny Tim.
Dickens began preparing A Tale
of Two Cities last January, and the
process involved much "cutting and
trimming." Although the result is an
abbreviated version of the novel, the
reading is filled with excellent voice
characterizations. A Tale of Two Ci-
ties makes its Ann Arbor debut
tonight. The Dickens Fellowship
and The Antiquarian Book Society
are sponsoring the event.
CHARLES DICKENS, assisted by
Bert Hornback, will read from A
TALE OF TWO CITIES tonight at
the Clements Library at 8 p.m. Ad-
mission is free.

Flesh For Lulu
Plastic Fantastic
Capitol Records
I've had this tape for a few weeks
now and it seems that whenever I'm
playing it, whoever is in the room
starts snapping their fingers or play-
ing finger drums. Even if they don't
know what they're listening to or
have never heard of Flesh For Lulu.
That's not an easy thing to accom-
plish in these Def Leppard/Grateful
Dead-infested days. Especially for a
neo-punk/rockabilly band that as-
sures us on the liner notes that they
use "ozone-friendly hair products."
Anyway, if you can handle the title,
you're in for a treat with this one.
A short history of the Flesh:
they're English and they got their
big break two years ago when "I Go
Crazy" was featured in John Hughes'
Some Kind of Wonderful.
The songwriting has improved
from even the first effort, Long Live
the New Flesh, although the first
single, "Decline and Fall," doesn't
quite live up to that album's single
"Postcards from Paradise." (But isn't
it more important to have a strong
album rather than a few catchy sin-
gles and a bunch o' filler?) Although
I'm sick of Europeans panning
American culture (maybe I've been

in my French class too long), '
"Decline and Fall" does hit the mark:
"I'm the king of Beverly Hills/ and I
don't feel no ills/ Perfect woman,
perfect wife/ smiling under surgeon's
knife."
The arrangements are sparse but
effective and the songs sound well-
polished. The ballads (relax, there are
only two) hold together better this
time, and singer Nick Marsh pulls
off some vocal feats that almost let
you forgive him for thanking Vision
Street Wear on the liner notes. Well,
almost. There's less keyboards this
time, although FFL has jumped on
the sampling bandwagon. For the
most part though, Rocco's guitar
dominates as the band manages to do
what not a lot of people seem ca-
pable of lately: changing styles.

0

a

The lyrics, on the other hand, are
nothing to write home about.
Would I scare anyone off if I revealed.,
that - God forbid - they actually
say "life's a beach" somewhere on
side two? I hope not, because if
you're looking for some rock 'n' roll
that leaves most of the crap you hear
on the radio in the dust, then Flesh
For Lulu is for you. If, that is, you
don't mind a few corny lyrics and
some ozone-friendly mousse.
-Mike Molitor

Loud Voices from a certain city
Don't worry, GRP jazz outfit New York Voices are Bobby McFerrin times 5. This vocal jazz quintet
harmonizes on a selection of standards and originals that runs the gamut from Ellington's "Caravan" to The
Yellowjackets' "Top Secret." The Voices can pull off a wicked scat solo and a smooth doo-wop with equal
prowess. Tune them in at the Bird of Paradise (207 S. Ashley) at the student show for only five bucks with an
ID. The 10:30 p.m. show costs $10. Be happy.

'96 TEARS'
Continued from page 7
recorded it, and Suicide recorded a
live version with synthesizers. The
Cramps even mention it in their
song "Human Fly" ("I've got 96
tears and 96 eyes") and so do X on
their song "Johnny Hit and Run
Pauline." The malevolent strain in
"96 Tears" has continued to thrive in
the work of Sonic Youth, Mudhoney
("Touch Me, I'm Sick") and The Je-
sus & Mary Chain.
For this writer, the song has be-

come part of his very being. I'm one
of those people who, fortunately or
unfortunately, think nothing is more
important in life than the art prod-
ucts that move me. Basically, I'm
made up of the traces of Tristan
Tzara's Dada manifestos, Kafka's
alienation, countless Hollywood
movies, and loads of words and
songs. I'm just another text -- a
compilation album of citations from
other texts. And I'm condemned to
feel that "96 Tears" is one of the
more important things that make up
my personality.

-Call for scripts for the second an-
nual "Shorts" festival. Put your ten-
minute act in Ari Roth's box, 1638
Haven Hall. Deadline is Oct. 24.
Put name, address, and phone num-
ber on cover.
-Free dance class on Saturdays in

2528 Frieze, 9-11 a.m. Liz Rossi is
the host.
-Auditions for Basements Arts Pro-
duction of Tennessee Williams' The
Case of the Crushed Petunias, di-
rected by Mike Garcia, Wednesday,
Oct. 18, 7-11 p.m. Sign up for an

audition time in the Green Room of
the Frieze Building.
Auditions and Opportunities runs
Wednesdays in the Michigan Daily
Arts page. If you have items for the
column, call 763-0379.

BETTER THAN THE BATHROOM WALLS!

I

cl ,"y

Give your message a
Touch.... .

CLASSIFIED ADSI Call 764-055'

LtchJta Dauth Personals

764-0557
BUSINESS LEADERS

8

of Tomorrow .
If you are considering
management studies,
let us tell you about

. 0

THE MICHIGAN
BBA
Come to an informational session
presented by the Business School

car,1j

Place:
Date:
Time:

Blue Carpet Lounge, Alice Lloyd
Thursday, October 19
6:30-7:30

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