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October 13, 1989 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-13
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9 0

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9 5

Cover Story
Continued from Page 9

Innocent

Reach 40,000 readers after class,
advertise in
MAGAZINE
Be a Daily Arts staffer,,,
or just look like one.
If you'd ilke to write for
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call 763-0379.

Visit back to campus gives
a teacher further insight

Continued from Page 4
makes you want to say "come on,
Tom, haven't you ever seen any
prison movies?" Everybody knows
that when the big guy says pass the
soap, you damn well better pass the
soap.
The two evil cops (Richard
Young and Badja Djola) are flat, one-
dimensional characters with abso-
lutely no indication they are indeed
human. They wantonly wreak havoc
on innocent lives and see themselves
as cocaine gurus. It's a wonder that
anyone in the police department
would put up with them for more
than five minutes, yet alone convict
Jimmie because they trust the two
cops.
An Innocent Man tries to remake
Bad Boys by adding trite romance
and a miscast Tom Selleck. I sup-
pose this film is somewhat enter-
taining for a totally mindless way to
wind down - watching gratuitous

vio
strn
pri:
nat
bea
the
Ma
ray
suc
und
a-h
for
end
Sel
ble
out,
resi
thir
sho

m

Robert Warner, now dean of the School of Information and Library Studies, remembers
LBJ's Great Society commencement address. He wrote a research paper on the speech.

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Betty Saldanha
By Betty Saldanha
I was going back to see what
campus life was like in the United
States, after 20 years of being home
in India.
From 1967-69, I studied abroad
as a student in Marquette Univer-
sity's graduate journalism program.
There weren't many of us enrolled at
the time- four or five at most - in
the program, but we learned, thought
and practiced the intricacies of writ-
ing closely with our professors.
Although the Ann Arbor campus
of the University of Michigan is a
similar Midwestern institution, there
is a big difference between it and the
smaller Marquette. Here, everything
is done on a grand scale: there are
fabulous buildings, and even larger
facilities. The grounds of the Uni-
versity have a manicured, old-world
look- from the ivy-covered build-
ings of the law school quadrangle to
the beautiful flowers that dot the
campus.
"They must need an army of care-
takers and gardeners," I thought to
myself, walking around campus.
In comparison, the union build-
ing at Marquette is merely a huge
common room with an adjoining
cafeteria. My friends at school would
often say, "Meet you at the union at
noon," and I would squeeze into a
seat between two Americans to wait.
They would be sure to spot me.
Here, though, you can get lost -
you have to specify exactly in which
floor, room, and corner to meet.
I was further impressed with the
University's many large study areas,
which are perfectly furnished and lit
for quiet, contemplative reading.
I was in Ann Arbor only for a
short while, as part of the Business

School's Spouses Program, at the
Executive Residence. The program
allows businesspeople and harried
executives to once again be students,
and also gives executives a chancy to
leave behind the pressures of their
working lives to think and re-learn
the ideals and theories of the busi-
ness world. My husband and son ac-
companied me to Ann Arbor.
I thought of using my earlier free
time in the week to teach a little of
what I do in India in Ann Arbor. At
home, I teach Mother Teresa's chil-
dren at the Rehabilitation Center in
Chandigarh, as a hobby class on
Saturdays. The students of the col-
lege of art at the local university
help me, as part of their practical
training. They share their skills with
those that have less.
So I took the campus bus to the
children's Activities Center, on the
sixth floor of the Mott's Children's
Hospital - a wonderful, happy
place - to try and teach some of the
same ideas here.
A recent seminar I attended in
physical medicine, dealing with the
latest techniques in rehabilitation,
had put me in touch with the people
at Mott's. After some phone calls I
was able, for one week, to conduct a
music therapy class to help handi-
capped children exercise their hands
and fingers, by moving to music.
I managed only three classes, but
they were so responsive, that I
would have loved to do more. There
was Jamie, age eight, who has been
at the hospital for about nine weeks,
and Jason, who has been there for
about a month. Both are confined to
wheelchairs. Jason loves basketball
and baseball. He played videogames
with my son, and loved it. Then

there was eight-year-old Marisol, a
lovely little girl with spina bifida,
who loves bracelets and rings.
Since I had to deal with above-
the-waist exercises, I taught the chil-
dren small movements - including
making flowers and bringing nature
into the room. I explained the grace,
space and pace of the movements,
and how our Indian movements are
circular and rounded while the Amer-
ican movements are often in straight
lines.
We also played the piano - the
children love music - which is
supposed to be good therapy for their
limbs, by keeping time to the mu-
sic, and using their hands. Kenny,
aged 12, was the best student of the
lot: enthusiastic, positive, and mov-
ing his arms with great gusto. The
hand co-ordination was especially
important. The group learned six
major exercises, including yoga
movements, exercises from the
Canadian PBX training program, and
even American jazz steps were
thrown in for good measure.
The point of the exercises was to
encourage the children to use their
fingers and arms. The music is an
incentive; more time will allow for
more work. But after seeing their en-
thusiasm, I headed back to India ex-
cited to lead new therapy sessions
there.
Instead of taking the bus back to
the executive residence, I decided to
go on foot. It is a complicated walk
from the hospital to the business
school, but well worth the trip.
There is one important thing I
learned from my visit back to Amer-
ica - one certainly learns much
more than one gives.

Clevenger said the Great Society
speechtwas "Johnson's commitment
to that program... It was his an-
nouncement of his administration's
direction. It certainly was an articula-
tion of what we were all working_
for."
he Great Society program
began in 1964, with the
monumental passage of the
Civil Rights Act and an
announcement of the "War on
Poverty."
Though Johnson began his War
on Poverty in January, 1964, four
months before the speech laid out
the philosophical basis for the Great
Society, Fine said it was the center-
piece of the program.
The War on Poverty consisted of
federal funding for local communi-
ties to address poverty (the
Economic Opportunity Act), the Job
Corps, the Neighborhood Youth
Prince
Continued from Page 7
feels like the Minneapolis sound,
pre-Paisley psychedelia and functions
as an offering to Prince's truest cult
audience. In a snide voice he croons,
"I don't really want a one-night
stand/I only want to feel u up/I don't
really want to be your man/I only
want to feel u up." It's funny, and I
couldn't picture Bruce Wayne spout-
ing a line like that in a million
years. This is a legit party on plastic
and face it, Prince rules.
-Forrest Green III

'It's in the history books.
You read any account of
the Johnson administra-
tion, they'll talk about the
the Great Society speech.'
Corps, VISTA, and the food stamp
program, among others.
But most of the legislation that
put the Great Society into practice
took place after the election of 1964.
Aside from the War on Poverty
efforts, legislation was passed foster-
ing development in depressed regions
of the country, establishing the Head
Start program for pre-school chil-
dren, aiding poverty-stricken public
school districts, and creating finan-
cial aid programs for needy college
students.
There was unprecedented concern
for the consumer, federal help for the
arts and the humanities, and over
$12 billion spent on beautification
PASS
IT
AROUND!

and conservation of the nation's nat-
ural scenery and resources.
The federal government passed
legislation designed to increase the
supply of affordable low income
housing.
And of course, there were the fa-
mous Voting Rights Act, Medicare,
and Medicaid.
Almost all of the legislation
from the Great Society is still with
us, though much of it is now in
modified form.
Clevenger looks back on his
years in Congress with satisfaction.
"We were going to change the world,
without question... and we did."

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