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October 06, 1989 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-10-06
Note:
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9

Reach 40,000 readers after class,
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W eed
MAGAZINE

WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

Complex questions
still plague Israel

Cover Story
Continued from Page 9

Poniewozik C
Continued from Page 10 Conti

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By Adam Schrager
"If you leave here with more
question marks than exclamation
points, then your trip will have been
worthwhile."
Simcha Dinitz, former Israeli
Ambassador to the United States dur-
ing the time of Camp David, issued
this statement to me this past sum-
mer when I asked him what he
wanted me to take from my trip to
Israel.
I was in Israel for my first time,
one of 15 college editors from
around the country, on a study tour
sponsored by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. The goal of
the tour, according to ADL
Jerusalem Director Harry Wall, was
for our group to "get a better under-
standing of the current Israeli situa-
tion and to have an open mind."
As a skeptic and a cynic, I not
only fit into the group very well,
but I also openly questioned the mo-
tives and reasons of the pro-Israel
organization for bringing me there.
The things Wall told us had me
thinking that from my previous ex-
periences, not only would I not un-
derstand the situation but I would
have already prejudged the issue.
Slowly but surely, as the trip
progressed, my skepticism wancd. I
became assured that the tour, whic
included many speakers and your
not-so-normal tour stops, was a le-
gitimate attempt to give us both
sides of a volatile issue.
We spoke with Israeli govern-
ment leaders, defense spokespeople
and soldiers, as well as Palestinian
journalists, an Arab K'nesset mem-
ber and inhabitants of a Palestinian
refugee camp. Because the tour was
co-sponsored by The Jerusalem Post,
the only Israeli daily paper published
in English, and we were all journal-
ists, a good amount of time was
spent with fellow writers, be they Is-
raeli, foreign or Palestinian.
Everybody had an opinion on
what to do about the Intifada. Some
were more open in their discussions,
while others sat passively back and
dropped hints as to their truetfeel-
ings. What nobody disagreed about
was that something had to be done
about the uprising, which is now
more than 22 months old.
This one issue has caused im-
mense turmoil in a country about
the size of New Jersey, and has
earned front-page headlines around
the world. Hundreds of Palestinians
have been killed in what is com-
monly known as the Occupied Terri-
tories, the Palestinian press is regu-
larly suppressed and the conditions
in the Palestinian refugee camps are
hardly exquisite.
So with all this information, a
solution seems easy: the Israelis
should leave the territories alone and

allow the Palestinians to govern
themselves. But it is not that sim-
ple.
Many Israelis pointed out to me
that neighboring Jordan is 75 percent
Palestinian, and seven of its 12 Cab-
inet members are Palestinian. In
essence, they said, the Palestinians
already have their own homeland.
When the British set up Palestine
and Trans-Jordan following the First
World War, Trans-Jordan was estab-
lished for the Palestinian people, ac-
cording to Dr. Yacov Goldberg, a
professor at the Dayan Center in Tel
Aviv University.
With so many different is-
sues underlying the situ-
ation, is there a right and
wrong?
Certain Israeli soldiers remarked
that there are other Arabs who have
become an accepted part of Israeli
society, such as the Druze and the
Bedoins. In fact, the some Druze
even serve in the Israeli army.
"There are other Arabs that live
peacefully within our society," said
one soldier, who had served for three
months in the Occupied Territories.
"Why can't the Palestinians start
thinking like the Druze and
Bedouins, and become incorporated
into our society?"
But the Palestinians feel it is not
Israeli society, but theirs.
"We have been hijacked since
1967," said Saieb Brekat, a political
scientist and one of the 1 board
members of the Palestinian Writers'
Association. "There are 1.7 million
people living under oppressive rule,
on what is legitimately their home-
land."
In the disputed areas, there are re-
ligious cities and towns that are shut
off not only to Israelis, but to any-
one who isn't Palestinian. We were
not allowed to go to Beersheba or
parts of Bethlehem, due to the vio-
lence that has occurred there.
The Israeli Defense Force reports
that the Palestinians are being killed
by fellow Palestinians who accuse
them of being Israeli government
collaborators. Palestinians claim Is-
raeli troops are killing its youth and
innocent people.
A discussion of Israel would not
be complete without mentioning
how deep the roots of the Holocaust
still are in that society and how
afraid Jews, in particular, are of
something like that happening
again. That fear is heightened by Is-
rael's neighbors whose only com-
mon interest, it appears, is to de-
stroy the only democracy in the area.
With so many different issues
underlying the situation, is there a
right and wrong? Are you confused?
Good, then the point was made.E

CINM IET Y

Members of Operation Rescue are carried away from Ann Arbor Planned Parenthood
last spring.

The U of M can be a large, im-
personal place for some stu-
dents. However, over the past
four years we have made
friends that we have cared for,
partyed with, and are about to
leave for the last time, who
would love to have a lasting
picture of us to keep forever... A
picture to look back upon and
laugh and cry and reminisce on
the days of maize and blue.

created myth. "We've always been
mobilized," Myers said, "We have a
strong grassroots movement on our
side."
Listing added that Right to Life
tends to concentrate more on educat-
ing and organizing people at the lo-
cal level, so their activities have not
received as much media attention.
In Ann Arbor
F rom appearances on campus,
the pro-choice movement has
gained strength from many
people - especially young
women - who have never been
politically active before, and have
thrown themselves into this issue
with a fervor.
The Ann Arbor Committee to
Defend Abortion Rights' member-
ship has swollen to over 200 since
the Webster decision. The committee
was formed last January to counter
Operation Rescue's attempts to shut
down abortion clinics, but has since
expanded its activities to education
projects.
AACDAR, as well as local chap-
ters of Planned Parenthood and the
National Organization for Women,
have designated next week as
Reproductive Rights Week, and have

organized panels and workshops on
campus.
The College Democrats have also
been active in the pro-choice move-
ment. Students in College
Democrats for Choice have been
working with Planned Parenthood
and will be lobbying in Lansing
against proposed anti-abortion legis-
lation.
Despite the fact that College
Democrats have taken an active pro-
choice stand both nationally and on
campus, abortion isrno longer an is-
sue split along party lines. Doug
Morris, chair of College
Republicans, said while most of his
group tends to be against abortion,
the group does not take an official
stance on the issue.
The activities of those who op-
pose abortion on campus have been
much more subtle than the consider-
able noise the pro-choice groups
have been making. The most dra-
matic anti-abortion activities have
been the area abortion clinic protests
staged by Operation Rescue, which,
although not a student group, in-
cludes some students.
Students For Life, a Right to
Life branch on campus, has not yet
planned any activities this year. LSA
senior and Students for Life member
Ann Evangelista said the group had

Well, if you can't beat 'em, join
'em, I guess. TheMichiganTDaily,
as you might know, sells T-shirts
every year; they're plain and boring
and don't turn much of a profit. But
maybe if we dropped that dull motto,
"Ninety-nine years of editorial free-
dom"...
"The Michigan Daily: We
promise not to come off on your
hands." Hmm. It just might work.E

evok
the sc
Altl
noval
also
write
else i
casio
ing, o
forcer
Coun
In Cc
case

recently organized a march protesting
the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing
abortion, in which about 50 students
participated.
Evangelista said that while she
believes "abortion is murder" and
most of the people she speaks with
take an anti-abortion stance, the ma-
jority of Americans are pro-choice.
However, she feels that people need
to be more aware of their options,
and that there are other alternatives
to abortion, such as adoption.
She added that many women who
decide to have abortions are scared
and feel it is the only alternative
they have. These women need to
know about financial and emotional
support that is available, she said.
While Students for Life does not
endorse Operation Rescue's activi-
ties, Evangelista said, there are
members who are involved in both
groups.
Although the Supreme Court de-
cisions on the abortion cases will

-

,IMESSHOWN ARE ,FOR TODAYC
A DRY WHITE SEASON
12:40,7:15,930,11:55

AN INNOCENT MAN
12:20,7:35,9:55, 12:15
IN COUNTRY 1220,930,12:05
SNEAK TONIGHIT OPM 'LOOK WHOS TALKING' O;CC
JOHNNY HANDSOME m
12:50, 7:40, 9:35, 11:45
BLACK RAIN H)
12:00,7:20,9:55, 1220
SEA OF LOVE
12:25, 7:30, 9:55, 12:10
SEX, LIES AND VIDEOTAPE
12:10, 7:25, 9:45, 12:00
UNCLE BUCK 12:35,7:30, 9:40, 11:40
THE ABYSS -
1:15, 7:15,10:00, 12:25
PARENTHOOD
12:05,725,9:50,12:10
HONEY, I SHRUNK THE KIDS
12:15
WHEN HARRY MET SALLY
12:45, 7:40, 9:40,11:55
LETHAL WEAPON 2-[
12:15, 7:45, 10-00,12:15
TURNER AND HOOCH
12:30,720,925,11:30
DEAD POETS SOCIETY
7:35, 10:05, 12:20

LH

--

Senior Portraits

October 2-6
This is the last week for you to be
remembered, so be sure to attend the i\ uganrfliaT
portrait sitings on the 2nd floor of the UGLI. ± v± Rabk

Reach 40,000 .readers after,
advertise in
k--e
WeekeM

probably not be announced until mmmm mmmmmmmmMu
next spring, the debate will continuelu
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level. And even when the Supreme 7 Days a Week
Court does rule on the cases, the
fight will surely not end there. It is a -t
battle that will continue in the Att es and
courts and in the streets. r St s
Discount and
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I

Page 6 Weekend/October 6,1989

Page 6

Weekend/Octobet 6', 1989

Weekend/October-6 1989.

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