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September 25, 1989 - Image 20

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-25

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C

Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Sports Monday - September 25, 1989
Griddes

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JOSE JUAREZ/Daily
Mike Barrowman, despite setting a world record in the 200-meter breaststroke this summer, is still climbing towards new goals.

Associated Press
Bush receives the Book of Griddes from Boston's Cardinal Bernard Law
Bush looks to God
for GrIddes help
After George Bush came in dead last in Griddes last week (the president
predicted only two games correctly), he decided to get some outside help.
Boston's Cardinal Bernard Law presented Bush with the ancient Book
of Griddes, which God is rumored to have given Moses at Mount Sinai.
"Griddes is just too darn important to take a chance on," Bush said. "I
want to make sure I win this week."
Law commented that the Pope, who is the keeper of the Book of
Griddes, often reads it by the pool or on the beach.
Mr. Bush and all other Daily readers can play Griddes for breakfast for
two at O'Sullivans Eatery and Pub on South University.
Drop your picks off at the Daily offices at 420 Maynard by 5 p.m.
Friday.

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Maryland at Michigan
Notre Dame at Purdue
Miami (Fla.) at Michigan State
Oregon State vs. Nebraska
Auburn at Tennessee
Colorado at Washington
Clemson at Duke
Texas-El Paso at Arkansas
Pittsburgh at West Virginia
Colorado at Washington
USC at Washington State
Alabama at Vanderbilt
Oklahoma at Kansas
Temple at Houston
Kent State at North Carolina State
Southern Mississippi at Texas A&M
Arizona at Oregon
California at UCLA
Boston College at Ohio State
Tulsa at Iowa

B ARROWMAN
Continued from Page 1
Barrowman moved on to the
regular national meet in the
summer of 1985 and took 11th
place in the 200 breaststroke, the
event at which he would
eventually become the best in the
world.
He moved up to 5th place the
next summer and found world
recognition in 1987 at the Pan
American Games, where he
finished second.
It was also about this time that
Barrowman, an Academic All-Big
Ten selection who is deciding
between an English and
Communications major, was
choosing which college
swimming team would benefit
from his obvious talents. "It was
down between Stanford and
Michigan," he said. "I enjoyed the
people at Michigan more and the
coach at Michigan more. That was
the thing that pushed it over the
top.
Barrowman quickly rose to the
top of the Big Ten in the
breaststroke, winning the 100- and
200-meter events at the
Conference Meet his first season.
His time of 1:58.35 in the 200 set
a Michigan, Big Ten and League
meet record. At the NCAA
Championships, he took fourth
place in the 200.
It was the summer after this
first year at Michigan when
Barrowman climbed to the top of
the American charts but so bitterly
experienced disappointment at the
Olympics.
After setting an American
record of 2:13.74 in winning the
Olympic Trials in August,
Barrowman fully had his sights set
on bringing home the gold medal
from Seoul.
But it was not to be and
Barrowman emerged from the
water without any medals around
his neck.
And so began a new mission,
one that would carry him not just
to the top of the world standings
in 1988, but would make him the
best there ever was in the 200
breaststroke.

The last American to hold the
world record in that event had been
John Hencken in 1974. It passed
from foreigner to foreigner all the
way to Victor Davis of Canada,
who swam a 2:13.34 at the 1984
Olympics in Los Angeles.
Barrowman arrived at the
United States Swimming Long
Course National Championships,
which were held at the University
of Southern California Olympic
pool, thinking world record. Not
to be denied, he shattered the mark
on Aug. 3 by nearly half a second,
finishing in 2:12.90 in a
preliminary heat. He then went on
to win the finals in 2:14.74.
"The day I set the record I was
just ecstatic the whole day,"
Barrowman said. "But the very
next day I got worried because I
knew (Nick) Gillingham was
going to be fast (at the European
Championships, which were to be
held two weeks later).
"All summer I knew he was
going to be able to be close. The
whole time for the next 19 days I

was just nervous. Just waiting for
him to swim. Waiting to get it
over with."
Barrowman's worries came
true, but he was still left with a
share of the record as Gillingham
could only manage to tie the
record in Europe.
"When he tied it, I guess that
was pretty much surprise, just
because he tied it," Barrowman
said.
But Barrowman would get
another chance to rise above
Gillingham.
And he did just that in a
qualifying heat of the Pan Pacific
Championships in Tokyo. Unlike
his previous half-second
annihilation of Davis' record,
Barrowman managed to break the
2:12.90 mark by a mere one one-
hundredth of a second in
swimming a 2:12.89.
"The night before I swam, I
don't think I've ever been so
psyched up to swim a race," he
said. "You swim a lot better the
first time you swim. To go faster

in Tokyo was a surprise to me."
Wilkening feels that
Barrowman's realization of his
dream has helped him forget the
agony of Seoul. "He seems a lot
more relaxed. He's grasped
something that's been out there
that he's been searching for," he
said. "Now he knows that he can
reach anything that he wants."
While he was preparing for the
summer championships,
Barrowman again dominated the
breaststroke events at the Big.
Ten's and NCAA's. He set a a Big
Ten meet record in the 100,
finished second in the 200 and
third in the 200 IM. At the
NCAA's, he swam the second
fastest 200 breaststroke ever,
placed second in the 100 and was a
consolationist in the 200 IM.
In addition to winning points
for the Wolverines, Barrowman
has helped Michigan's younger
swimmers. Eric Wunderlich,
another breaststroke specialist,
said, "It's great, especially for
training. Training with a world
record holder obviously pushes me
to go faster and try to race him and
beat him during workout."
"When he came in his
freshman year, he seemed like he
was more focused on himself as an
individual swimmer," Wilkening
said. "It's been extremely exciting
to watch him evolve into a team-
type swimmer."
Barrowman is so serious about
swimming that he compares it to
a job. "You're in a position where
you have to get up at five in the
morning. You have to go to work
out. You have to go to sleep after
that. You put in 10 hours a day.
You wouldn't be putting in 10
hours a day in anything but a
job," he said. "When you're
talking about swimming six hours
a day and resting five out of those
12 you're awake, you've got about
an hour of spare time, so there's
not really much time to do
anything.
"Right now, that's the way
I've got to look at it," he said.
"For me, when I get out of this,
it's going to be easier."
However, for now Barrowman
will stay with swimming and of
course set new goals. "Mike
remained the same Mike he has
always been," Urbanchek said. "He
is still working toward the goal of
perhaps the next Olympics."
And who knows what after
that.
PASS
IT
AROUND!

0

h,

Score of Michigan Game:
Michigan
Maryland
Name and Phone #:

JOJU AREZ/Daily
Mike Barrowman has risen to the very top of the breaststroke world.

Unfold Your
Full Potential
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITA TION
Learn more at our free introductory lectures

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