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September 25, 1989 - Image 12

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page 12-The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 25, 1989
Bach for a buck

Experience
BY AMI MEHTA
So, you're finally tired of your so-
cial calendar being a blur of wall-to-
wall frat parties and aimless bar-
hopping. Has the party animal roar
in you worn down to a dull whim-
per? There is an alternative (besides
studying) to the stereotypical
Animal House ballyhoo on this
campus. You've proven that you can
party with the best of 'em; now it's
time to add a little class to your col-
lege life. Inexpensively, of course.
The first step to discovering the
culturally-hip you is picking up a
free Current Entertainment Guide
available in dorm lobbies, the
Campus Information Center in the
Union and various drugstores. This
is your ticket to the monthly hap-
penings in Ann Arbor - your cul-
tural bible. Current contains a de-
tailed list of theater events, a cinema
guide, club and concert information,
and for the choosier crowd there is a
section describing alternatives rang-
ing from poetry readings to transcen-
dental meditation to rugby tourna-
ments. Each section lists events for
every day of the month, along with
time and cost. It's perfect for those
days and nights when you want to do

cultural Ann Arbor cheaply
something a little unique. these performances may be purchased
For those who dare to climb for half-off the lowest price if they
higher on the cultural ladder, the are bought in person at the Burton
University Musical Society provides Memorial Tower ticket office on the
a rush policy for tickets to major day of the show, or on Saturday for
performing arts events which keeps weekend shows. Seating is at the
in mind the low budgets of college discretion of box office personnel.
students. Events include American But if you're not ready to be la-
and visiting symphonies, string belled a connoisseur of the arts just
yet, you can still find a variety of
inexpensive artsy alternatives.
Several museums on campus offer
free admission, including the
University Museum of Art and the
Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.
And to break in those dancing shoes,
free passes are available for the
Nectarine Ballroom at campus record
stores. Also, the Office of Major
Events is always in need of students
to usher upcoming concerts. See per-
formers such as the Pogues and
Jethro Tull - for free. Although the
mass meeting has already been held,
call the office for further details at
763-5117.
With the stress of classes begin-
The Hands-On Museum is a ning again and everyone's busy work
hotspot for kids and thrifty parents, and play schedules, it's nice to sink
but students can have a good time, into a seat in a dark movie theater
too.
with a bucket of popcorn and be en-
quartets, choirs, operas and ballets veloped into an exciting movie or go
- all impressive prospects for a date dancing to get your aggressions out
or a night on the town. Tickets for until the soles of your shoes have

6
I

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Hill Auditorium here hosts UB40, but classical music is its usual fare. Enjoy symphonies or soloists with the t
University Musical Society's rush ticket policy, where tickets can fall as low as $5 for major events.

worn through. Now there's no rea-
son not to have an enriched social

life that consists of more than par- know. Do the right thing. Do tbe
ties with people you don't even cultural thing. That's the ticket. 6

REVIEWS
Continued from Page 10
the underground comic in the late
sixties. The artists interviewed form
a cross section of the comic book
industry: William M. Gaines, the
founder of both Mad and Tales from
the Crypt (which was central to the
'50s controversy); Robert Crumb,
who escaped the greeting card indus-
try in the late sixties for San
Francisco, LSD, and Fritz the Cat;
Stan Lee - the creator of Spiderman
- who almost left the industry, but
was convinced to try again and form
Marvel comics, where superheroes
aren't so super; Lynda Barry, creator
of Ernie Pook's Comeek, one of the
new wave of comic artists who
tackle real-life issues; Harvey Pekar,
who doesn't even draw his own
comics, but writes hyper-realistic
stories of everyday life in Cleveland;
Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, and
many more. Especially fascinating
are the moments when many of
these artists and writers read directly
from their comics, as Mann's camera
shows the action. Though shot on a

shoestring budget while Mann was
working on a documentary on the
making of Legal Eagles, this film
has a professional look and covers
its topic fully as it presents yet an-
other criticism of the anal retentive
America of the 1950s. It played at
the Detroit Institute of Arts theater
on Friday and Saturday and should be
in Ann Arbor before the end of the
century
-Mike Kuniavsky
Rap-ping on a
bench
The Ann Arbor Civic Theatre cel-
ebrates its sixtieth anniversary this
year, with two series of plays dedi-
cated to the dramatic well-being of
our community. MainStage kicked
off its "Gem of a Season" this week-
end with a serio-comic romp through
Herb Gardner's Tony Award-winning
play, I'm Not Rappaport. The play
ran Wednesday through Sunday at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Essentially a two-person show,
Rappaport celebrates the dignity of
the human spirit - particularly

those older human spirits out there
- in a series of modest, ingenious
encounters on a New York City park
bench. Steve Dixon's Midge was the
perfect half-blind Sancho to Peter
Bellanca's irrepressible elderly
Quixote, Nat. "Lies? I don't tell
lies," explained Nat half-way
through. "I make alterations.
Sometimes the truth doesn't fit." At
times, Dixon's Black dialect and
Bellanca's Jewish accent were a little
too strong to be understood by the
predominantly older audience - sev-
eral key lines had to be hushedly re-
peated throughout the performance.
But the production still succeeded to
communicate its important message
as well as entertain.
The "Gem of a Season" series fea-
tures five more plays:
-The Mystery of Edwin Drood, by
Rupert Holmes. (October 25-28)
-The Lion in Winter, by James
Goldman. (December 13-16)
-To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper
Lee. (March 7-10)
-Brigadoon, by Fredrick Loewe and
Alan Jay Lerner. (April 18-21)

-The Musical Comedy Murders of
1940, by John Bishop. (June 20-23)
All shows are at Mendelssohn,
except Brigadoon at the Michigan
Theater.
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre on
MainStreet calls its season "Risky
Business," staging five more plays
at the location on 1035 South Main
Street:
-A Lie of the Mind, by Sam
Shepard. (September 28-October 14)
-Lysistrata by Aristophanes.
(November 2-18)
-A Lesson from Aloes, by Athol
Fugard. (February 1-17)
-Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and
Living in Paris, by Eric Bleu. (April
26-May 12)
-Twelfth Night, by William
Shakespeare. (July 5-21)
S-1
For ticket information, call
AACT at 662-7282.

"t

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-Mark Sw

Undergraduate

TROTTER HOUSE
PICNIC
Saturday, September 23, 1-7 pm
ALL ARE WELCOME!
Festivities include:

v
r d$
t

FREE FOOD!
Indoor Games
Volleyball & Tug of War
3 on 3 Basketball Tournament!
come at 1pm for sign-up
student I.D. card mandatory
for more info, call:
Kevin Ramon
998-7037

Undergraduate
Psychological Society
MASS MEETING
For current & prospective members
7:00 pm Monday, Sept 25
Pendelton Room, Michigan Union
Happy Hour at
Dominicks, 4:30 pm
Thursday, Sept 28th

MICHIGANENSIAN.
Is it communicable?

artz If you like pina coladas, you'll love Rupert Holmes' musical The Mystery o
Edwin Drood, to be staged in October at the Ann Arbor Civic Theater
K

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$4.00

(Every Tuesday & Wednesday)
6:00 - 9:00pm
ALL YOU CAN EAT SPAGHETTI!

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University of Michigan Housing Special Programs'" A Unit of Student Services ,

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(Every Sunday)
5:00 - 9:00pm
WE DELIVER!!
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To audition you must attend
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More than an adventure.
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