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September 20, 1989 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-20

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The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, September 20, 1989 - Page 5

POLITICS
Continued from Page 1
ing service, and less money for non-
campus projects in Central America.
Success in influencing the
ssembly seems likely for the
College Republicans, with the
Conservative Coalition now holding
about one-third of the MSA seats.
But while the Democrats and
Republicans are focusing on specific
issues this year, both groups say
they are attracting people because
they are multi-issue oriented.
-"There are a lot of single interest
4soups on campus. Though many
p concerned about the policies in
Central America - racism, etc. -
thy want to be involved in more
tlan one issue," Kosson said.
"While abortion is the top issue, it's
not the only issue."
The Democrats intend to work on
environmental issues through the
Ann Arbor City Council, the mini-
nyum wage law and the gun control
'slue, Kosson said.
The Republicans also have two
gcrls, Kotcher said. "One: it is a so-
cia organization where Republicans
can gather to hear prominent speak-
ers. The other is relatively new -
getting involved in MSA and the
(Public Interest Research Group In
Michigan) issue."
Several members of the College
Republicans have stated their com-
itment to fighting any type of
egative-check student fee assess-
ment which would allocate money to
PIRGIM. The group also wants to
work on special projects like estab-
lishing an Accuracy in Academia
chaipter.
Both groups say their increased
membership is what motivates them
to be more active. Membership in
the College Republicans currently
itnumbers that of the College
emocrats by about 2 to 1, despite
last year's campus election results
which found that over 65 percent of
the campus voted Democratic.
Though new membership figures
are not completed yet, the Democrats
report that about 150 people ex-
pressed interest in becoming mem-
bers at Festifall last week, while the
Republicans attracted about 300.
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

FMLN
U.S. in
in peac
by Patrick Staiger

seeks

fluence~
e talks

The United States will play a
crucial role in the current El
Salvador peace talks, representatives
of the country's political military
opposition told about 30 students
and faculty in the Michigan League
last night.
"It is only the U.S. government
which can tell the ARENA party to
go through with the talks," said
Farabundo Marti National Liberation
Front (FMLN) representative Ramon
Cardona.
The Nationalist Republican
Alliance (ARENA), which came to
power in EL Salvador in June, met
with the FMLN last week in Mexico
City to end by political means the
country's nine year civil war. Both
sides agreed to continue the talks
Oct. 16.
ARENA, considered on the ex-
treme right wing by the U.S. gov-
ernment, represents the land owning
elite in the country. ARENA has
been tied to rightist death squads in
El Salvador, and are thought by
many to be responsible for the
killing of Archbishop Romero in
1980.
Despite these allegations, the
U.S. has continued sending military
aid to El Salvador, which since 1980
has totalled $3.6 billion.
Gladice Sibrian, who was forced

to flee El Salvador in 1981 for work-
ing with Christian social groups, de-
fended the FMLN's military ap-
proach to change conditions in the
country.
"In El Salvador, two percent of
the people own 60 percent of the
good land and the majority have been
left in a situation of poverty and re-
.pression, struggling for their basic
needs," she said. "We started the
armed struggle because there was no'
other option to change the structure-
of the society."
She added, "I come from the'
countryside where there were noi
schools or clinics. People died of
simple illnesses like diarrhea becausei
there is nothing there for them."'
Sibrian also said the U.S. could:'
influence of the current government,
and said the war could end if they,
U.S. stopped sending military aid to'
the country.
"Our main request to the U.S.'
government is to keep their hands
off," she said.
The FMLN has declared a unilat-
eral cease-fire during the negotia-'
tions, and proposed a general cease
fire by Nov. 15.0
The talk was sponsored by the
Committee in Solidarity with the;
People of El Salvador and the Latin
American Solidarity Committee.
The groups will begin an awareness
series on El Salvador in October.

JULIE HOLLMAN/Dailv

Bailando!
Members of the Raices Mexicanas dance group perform the Latino dance "Baile Folklorico" at East Quad
auditorium. The dance group performed as part of the Hispanic Heritage Celebration.
Attorneys denounce alleged
ClubMed prison vacations

LANSING, Mich. - Prisons
should be less like a long vacation at
ClubMed and more like a bad
experience convicts never will want
to face again, members of the
Prosecuting Attorneys Association
of Michigan said Monday.
Michigan's criminal justice
system has been ineffective in deter-
ring crime and repeat offenses, said
John O'Hair, head of the prosecu-
tor's group and the Wayne County
prosecutor.
"We have a system that doesn't
rehabilitate and doesn't punish,"
O'Hair said. "We want to reduce
crime and restore the quality of life
to our communities.
"The prison system doesn't have
to be inhuman, but we want people
to serve a consequence. Right now

they're sitting around, watching TV,
socializing."
The rigorous work of a boot
camp approach or elimination of all
privileges like the proposed
SuperMax setting would be more ef-
fective in deterring crime, the prose-
cutors said.
O'Hair says 40 percent of the
inmates eligible for a concentrated
stay in a boot comp chose to stay in
the regular prison system and serve
much longer terms instead. This, he
says, illustrates that Michigan pris-
ons are too easy on prisoners.
Gail Light, a spokeswoman for
the Department of Corrections,
acknowledged that many prisoners
are idle but attributed that to crowded
prisons with too few jobs to give
them.

"The prisoners who don't have
jobs aren't spending their time
having fun playing tennis or swim-
ming; they're wandering around try-
ing to figure out what to do with
themselves," Light said.
She said the Department of
Corrections favors the approach of
requiring prisoners to earn privi-
leges, noting a new law that limits
the amount of personal property in-
mates can have until they work their
way down to lower security facili-
ties. Light pointed out that the
SuperMax program is too expensive
to accommodate all prisoners.
Other recommendations the
prosecutors' association plans to
push in the Legislature include more
meaningful parole and probations
programs, O'Hair said.

A 2-HOUR TREKS" A " THON!
" STAR TREK BLOOPERS
" Animated Star Trek " Special Three-Season Retrospective
" Previews & Behind-the-Scenes 0 2nd Pilot Outtakes
" Plus-Official Star Trek Trivia Quiz
TUE-WED SEPTEMBER 19-20
MICHIGAN THEATRE
SHOWS 9:00 PM

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