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September 07, 1989 - Image 17

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-07

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The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition - Thursday, Septe'nbor 7, 1989 - Pag 17

VP Wilson

leaves

'U'

Research flourishes
in time of transition
l Wistrom

vayaaf4wie al'c ClAinic'4LLal . %.L&arI1 .Center,

Even though most U-M students
probably don't know who Linda
Wilson is, the decisions and policies
she left behind when she resigned
from her post as vice president for
research to assume the presidency of
Radcliffe College will affect nearly
everyone here.
At a strong research university
like the Michigan, the vice president
for research plays a necessary and
powerful role in the administration.
As the first female vice president at
the University, Wilson oversaw re-
search carried out by thousands of
people at the University and its affil-
iated institutes. During her term in
the the University's administration,
the money brought in from research
grants rose from $159.3 to 234.6
million.
Almost every faculty member at
the University is actively involved
in research, as are a large number of
students and staff. Master's and doc-
torate candidates trying to complete
dissertations aren't the only students
doing research. Many undergraduates
also participate in research for inde-
pendent study credit or money or
both.
Many work-study and summer
jobs are available in research areas,
especially in laboratories where
biomedical research takes place.
Though some students feel like little
more than "glorified dishwashers"
after spending hour after hour wash-
ing beakers and flasks, many receive
invaluable research experience and
resume material that is very helpful
in getting jobs or admitted to gradu-
ate or professional schools after
graduation.
Another way that students can
earn money through research is par-
ticipating in studies as "human
guinea pigs." This may involve
something as innocuous as filling
out a psychology questionnaire and
getting $5 for an hour's work , or a
more involved 2-month study where
the compensation is $250 but it re-
quires injections of medicinal drugs,
blood-sampling, and several all-day
oreverrovernight stays in the hospi-

Notices for studies needing partici-
pants are often posted around campus
or in "The University Record."
U-M has an extensive and varied
research program. Projects that are
currently underway include such di-
verse topics as cloning the gene re-
sponsible for neurofibromatosis
(better known as elephant man's
disease), mathematical studies into
high-dimensional quasi-formal map-
pings, the design of manual trans-
mission controls in automobiles, the

Geological Sciences Prof.
William C. Kelly, who served as as-
sociate vice president for research
under Wilson, took over her position
in an interim capacity on July 1.
The University will begin the formal
search for a permanent successor in
September.
Kelly has been on the U-M fac-
ulty since 1956, and his administra-
tive experience includes serving as
chairperson of the Department of
Geological Sciences from 1978-81
and as interim director of the
Institute of Science and Technology
from 1986-87.
University President James J.
Duderstadt said that "Prof. Kelly's
current role as associate vice presi-
dent for research, along with his aca-
demic and administrative background
at the U-M, make him extremely
well qualified to assume this new
position."
The area of expertise of both
Kelly and Wilson was in the
sciences. Wilson was an inorganic
chemist who also published research
articles in higher education and
science policy, while Kelly is an in-
ternationally recognized authority on
the application of chemistry, miner-
alogy, and petrology to the study of
ore deposits.
Duderstadt said that "it is difficult
to lose a colleague of Linda's stature
and abilities... And no one deserves
this new challenge more tian Linda
Wilson, whose intellectual gifts,
policy vision, and administrative tal-
ent have served Michigan so well
these last four years."
Until a permanent successor to
Wilson is named, it is difficult to
predict how the course of research at
the University will be affected by her
departure. Her strong commitment to
supporting the role of women in
science will be missed by many at
the University.
Dr. Cinda-Sue Davis, director of
the Women in Science Program at
the at Michigan, said "I have to ad-
mit I feel that she is a real advocate
for women in science that we never
had before." See Research, Page 20

To "Beat" or not to Beat? FILE PHOO
After nearly 10 months at downtown Ann Arbor's Heidelberg restaurant, local personality Martin Tury's
original rock'n'roll club, The Beat, found itself without a home in mid-July. Heidelberg mamager Fritz
Kochendorfer said that he had kicked out Tury over debts; Tury claims to have instigated the split himself,
initially indicating that he was seeking a new location for the club, which earned a reputation for breaking
local bands onto the scene. While the guitarist/songwriter can now be seen busking around State Street, the
future of his venture seems doubtful - if only in name. A similar roster of college/ garage rock bands has
continued on stage at Kochendorfer's site - under the "Club Heidelberg" banner.

Wilson
causes and treatment of childhood
depression, .and long-term, intimate
social relationships among wild ba-
boons.
The research is carried out in ev-
ery department and school of the
University. The U-M is also home
to a number of research programs
and institutes which are funded by
money from many sources, includ-
ing private organizations and corpo-
rations as well as the state and fed-
eral governments.
A partial list includes: The
Transportation Research Institute,
The Institute of Gerontology, Center
for Population Planning, Center for
Ergonomics, Middle English
Dictionary Project, Polymer
Research Laboratory, Center for
Afro-American and African Studies,
and Research Center for Group
Dynamics.

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(313) 761-4920

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