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September 13, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

POLICY
Continued from Page 1
Harris. "I think if they have a policy
that will deal with particular of-
fenses, then I think that's a good
thing."
Harris said he believed students
and faculty would take action against
discriminatory comments regardless
of a University policy.
Regent Thomas Roach (D-Saline)
said he could not comment on the
possibility of an interim policy until
he has been counseled by Cole at the
regents' meeting.
"It's a big tension because clearly
we want to do what we can to stop
(racism) and at the same time free-
dom of speech is a very important
basic right," Roach said.
Cole said the regents could make
extensive revisions to whatever pol-
icy may be proposed. If the interim
policy is proposed it will be up for
review in December, the same time
the original policy would have been
reconsidered.
VIGIL
Continued from Paze 1
abeth King, president of Human
Rights for China, a coalition of
Chinese American groups in the
Detroit area.
"History and experience have
proven again and again that it is
only through tireless efforts, through
rsistent determination of dedicated
individuals that things happen, that
change is brought about, and that
himan rights and freedom can be fi-
n$lly realized," King said.
"We need a strong leadership and
more knowledge of democracy," said
Jiwen Duan, the second of two
speakers at the rally. "We need to
otganize to fight with the dictators."
On October 1, the students plan
#*to march in Washington D.C. at the
largest expected demonstration ever
in the U.S., King said. Students
from across the nation, politicians,
and musicians are expected to partic-
pipate in the demonstration which
will include a rock concert and rally
at the Chinese Embassy.
Read
~D aie4
C&Lied

-Wednesday, September 13, 1989- The Michigan Daily - Page 5
Koch projected to
lose in N.Y. race

Associated Press_
New York Mayor Edward Koch
trailed rival David Dinkins in a
Democratic primary Tuesday. An
early Koch lead slipped away and
exit polls indicated that Dinkins, the
Manhattan borough president, would
take the first step toward becoming
the city's first Black mayor.
With 74 percent of 5,244
precincts reporting, Dinkins had
351,165 votes to Koch's 346,843.
Two additional candidates trailed far
behind.
The exit polls by three New York
television stations projected that
Koch, in quest of an unprecedented
fourth term in office, would lose the
Democratic primary to Dinkins.
WCBS projected Dinkins would
carry 97 percent of the Black vote
and as much as 33 percent of the
white.
In the Republican primary,
former prosecutor Rudolph Giuliani
overpowered cosmetics heir Ronald
Lauder in an unusually bitter race.
Although the GOP primary is usu-
ally an afterthought in New York,

Giuliani is well known and popular,
and political strategists believe he
could be a formidable candidate in
the November general election.r F
With 60 percent of the precincts:
reporting, Giuliani led Lauder 67
percent to 33 percent.
ei

Read
Ube
Vai4
C&1561jkd6

Associoted Press.
Under investigation
U.S. Representative Barney Frank speaks to reporters at Washington hotel Tuesday where he was to speak at a
business luncheon. Earlier the House Ethics Committee decided to conduct an investigation into Frank's conduct.

Michigan Daily
SPORTS
763-0376

1

FOOTBALL
Continued from Puge 3
about football.
"I don't find it fun to sit in
games with all the rowdiness I've
heard about," said first-year student
Vickie Yin, who hails from
Tennessee. "I went to one football
game in my life and when it was
over I didn't know what the score
was."
Yin plans to spend Saturday
afternoon studying, sleeping, writing
letters, and talking on the phone.
Charece Davis, from Detroit, fol-

lows sports, but prefers Michigan
basketball over football. "Football is
nothing that I ever followed, even
though I'll be watching on TV,
cheering on the maize and blue," she
said.
The Michigan Athletic Ticket
Office estimated that at least 70 per-
cent of incoming students purchase
season tickets.
Even though some students
won't be going, come Saturday, the
north end zone will once again be
populated bya legion of newcomers
to the land of painted faces,
"popcorn," and "key plays."

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