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September 11, 1989 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-11

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-Monday, September 11, 1989- The Michigan Daily - Page 3

Colombi
extradite
cocaine
Associated Press official, sp
BOGOTA, Colombia - The anonymity,t
Colombian government will the gover
extradite three more reputed cocaine extradition
traffickers wanted in the United imprisonedt
States on charges of money- The three
laundering and drug smuggling, an Rodriguez,
official said yesterday. accused of d
The announcement came after a Quintana,
weekend of army raids on ranches allegedly l
believed owned by the country's top Alberto Gar
two "drug barons." also for alleg
Soldiers seized property It was n
including cattle, tropical birds and were notified
swimming pools, the army and the they have f
El Espectador Daily said. extradition or
In Medellin, the nations's second- Eduardo
largest city, a series of attacks linked laundering
to drug cartels continued. A bomb cocaine mo
damaged a liquor factory, hooded Cartel, wasf
assailants set a city garbage truck on States last
fire, and police defused a bomb at a appeal.
branch of a government-run savings An army
bank. asking not
No injuries were reported. security real
In western Colombia, assailants seized over d
killed a foreperson and set fire to the to belong to
ranch of a government official who drug bosses
wanted the confiscated rural property Gonzalo Gac
of drug traffickers distributed to be the numb
the peasants. in the Medell
o a A National Drug Council Last mo

in gov't
s three
traffickers

Assocloted Pi

Freedom of the West
Last night, many of the 7,000 vacationing East Germans in Hungary raised their handsi
now that they are permitted to live freely in West Germany

eaking on condition of
told the Associated Press
rnment has signed
orders for three
Colombians.
e were identified as Ana
jailed in Bogota and
rug trafficking; Bernardo
jailed in Bogota for
aundering money; and
mboa, jailed in Medellin,
ged laundering.
not known if the three
d. Once they are notified,
ive days to appeal the
rder.
Romero, charged with
millions of dollars of
aney for the Medellin
extradited to the United
week after losing his
y officer in Medellin,
to be identified for
sons, said the properties
the weekend are believed
two of the most wanted
: Pablo Escobar and
ha. They are believed to
er 1 and number 2 men
lin cocaine cartel.
onth, after assassins'
the traffickers killed
is Carlos Galan, the
dential candidate and an
foe of drug cartels,
irgilio Barco assumed
powers and ordered
bank accounts and
ught to be tied to the

drug trade.
Since then, the army and police
have made public numerous
confiscated documents showing thf
purported multimillion-dollar,
multinational holdings of
Colombia's most notorious drug
barons, all currently in hiding.
Drug terrorists have retaliated
with incessant attacks on property
belonging to the ggvernment and the
Colobian establishment, especially
in Medellin, where their cartel is
based.
The Supreme Court is still
debating whether Barco's emergency
powers are constitutional. If they
decide they are not, the government
might have to return confiscated
property.
Soldiers who raided a ranch
Saturday in Puerto Boyaca, 95 miles
north of Bogota in the notorious
Magdalena Medio cocaine-lab zone,
found fenceposts marked GRG,
presumably for Rodriguez Gacha, El
Espectador said.
The main ranch house contained
walls of Italian marble, the report
said.
Colombia has offered a reward of
$250,000 for information leading to
the arrest of Escobar or Rodriguez
Gacha, who also head the United
States' list of Colombians wanted
for extradition on drug-trafficking
charges.
Colombia supplies about 80
percent of the cocaine reaching the
United States.

in a show of jubilation

*Hungarian

immigrants

seek

fre edom
Associated Press

in

West

BUDAPEST, Hungary -
Hungary announced Sunday that
0 more than 7,000 East Germans who
fled their Communist homeland will
be allowed to leave refugee camps
for West Germany which began at
midnight last night.
Hungary thus becomes the first
Eastern bloc government to help the
citizens of another Communist na-
tion escape to the West. The mass
emigration of East Germans to West
Germany will be the largest since
the Berlin Wall was built in 1961 to
stem the flow across the border.
East Germany promptly attacked
the Hungarian decision, charging
that Budapest had "directly interfered"
in its internal affairs.
"The Hungarian government has
chosen to illegally allow East
German citizens to travel to West
Germany in violation of interna-
tional treaty," the state-run news
agency ADN said.
It said that Hungary, "under the
guise of humanitarianism, has en-
gaged in the organized smuggling of
human beings."
West Germany thanked Hungary
for what it called a "humanitarian"
act.
A statement yesterday by the of-
ficial Hungarian news agency MTI
said: "Hungary has decided to make
it possible for the East German citi-
zens staying in Hungary and refusing
to return home to leave to any coun-
try which is prepared to let them
through or receive them."
"Interior Minister Istvan Horvath
instructed the police and border
guards to let East German citizens
leave Hungary with their East

German travel documents," it said.
"The borde guards are instructed to
let them leave at any border point."
It said that that would begin last
night.
The Hungarian foreign minister,
Gyula Horn, suggested on Hungarian
TV that tens of thousands of other
East Germans now vacationing in
Hungary also may choose to leave
for the West along with those in the
refugee camps.
To make the exodus possible, he
said that Hungary chose to suspend a
1969 bilateral agreement with East
Germany, a Warsaw Pact ally, say-
ing Hungary should not take into ac-
count West Germany's claim to East
Germans.
The fate of the refugees had been
discussed for weeks by East and
West Germany, with Hungary insist-
ing it was primarily a bystander in-
terested in seeing a solution. The
communique said, "The talks be-
tween East Germany and West
Germany ended in failure."
It did not elaborate.
West Germany, which offers East
Germans automatic citizenship and
help getting settled, has already set
up camps in Bavaria to receive the
refugees.
"This is a humanitarian decision
and an act of European solidarity. I
am deeply thankful to the Hungarian
government," Chancellor Helmut
Kohl of West Germany said in
Bonn.
East German diplomats who were
sent to the refugee camps continued
to try to persuade the East Germans
to return home, telling them they
would not be punished. But few
refugees were prepared to listen.
Instead, many proudly converted
the "DDR" sign on their cars that

'I
xermany
signifies they come from t
German Democratic Republic t
single "D"- the auto sign for W
Germany.
Others painted red, black, a
gold insignias on the vehicles,1
left off the hammer and sickle t
distinguishes the East German f
from West Germany's.
Most of the East Germans ha
spent days and weeks huddled in t
communities, boarding houses
summer cabins, watching th
hopes of emigration to W
Germany rise and fall with each da
The refugee problem was a di
cult one for Hungary, which wan
to show West Germany that it
committed to new, Western conce
of human rights but reluctant
anger hard-line Communist lead
in East Berlin.
Hungary recently began imp
menting democratic reforms simi
to those being adopted by Poland a
the Soviet Union, but East Germa
has not.
As word spread earlier throu
the refugee camps that the mass e
igration was imminent, the jubil
East Germans began packing th
bags and welcoming other E
Germans who continued to stre
into the makeshift shelters.
Wolfgang Wagner, who runsI
temporary shelters, told reporte
"The mood is terrific" amongt
refugees. He pointed to E
Germans who were packing their f
belongings at one of the sev
Budapest refugee camps.
Red Cross officials said ea
Sunday that it was likely the dep
ture would be spread over one, t
or three days to avoid jamming1
roads or overwhelming the natio
train and bus lines.

Tes
and
but
hat
lag
ave
ent
or
eir
est
iy.
ffi-
ted
is
pts
to
ers
le-
ilar
and
ny
igh
m
ant
ieir
ast
am
the
ors,
the
ast
few
ven
rly
ar-
wo
the
n's

PASS
IT
AROUND!1
Share the
news,
Ittb1lai1

working for
Senator Lu
leading presi
outspoken
President V
emergency
seizures of
property tho

ci
C')
(I)

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Alarm buzzes
for five hours
Firefighters were called to the
Burnham and Associates Apartment
Complex at 543 Church St. at about
11:23 p.m. Saturday night to inves-
*tigate the malfunctioning of a fire
,alarm.

The alarm, said residents Dennis
and Janet Joyner, had been going off
since 6 p.m.
"We checked the place to make
sure it wasn't burning down... and
figured someone would come along,"
said Janet.
The alarm was turned off by
11:41 p.m., much to the relief of
neighbors.

GE

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CSRP1 E _

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