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December 12, 1989 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-12-12

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IM

OPINION
Campus democracy dies

4

ARTS

9

SPORTS

13

Shawn Colvin goes beyond Dylan-esque

'M' cagers thrash Chicago State 84-57

*000*wloolom

Ninety-nine years of editorial freedom

- -

Vol. C, No. 68 Ann Arbor, Michigan-Tuesday, December 12,1989

Judiciary

rules

MSA

election invalid

by Josh Mitnick
Daily MSA Reporter
For the first time in the Michi-
gan Student Assembly's history, the
results of its LSA elections were de-
clared invalid by a unanimous ruling
pf the Central Student Judiciary.
Because MSA election directors
destroyed the ballots last week, the
judiciary decided candidates had been
denied their rights to a recount and
reversed the election court's earlier
decision validating the ballots.
As a result of the decision, nine
seats - almost a fifth of the assem-
bly - are now vacant. Student Gen-
eral Counsel John Coleman said
MSA would not sponsor any new
elections to fill the positions.
According to the assembly's con-
stitution, no new elections could be
held for 65 days, meaning the elec-
6Oons would be held within weeks of
MSA's spring elections, Coleman
* said.
Coleman said the LSA Student
Government would be responsible

Court says LSA ballots m ishandled

for filling the vacancies created by
the court decision.
Jennifer Clough, LSA-SG presi-
dent, said last night MSA president
Aaron Williams told her LSA-SG
"Panama has now
come to the Univer-
sity of Michigan'
- Conservative Coalition
candidate Joe Sciarotta
should appoint representatives to fill
the vacancies. She said despite
William's request that she make the
appointments herself, the entire
LSA-SG will decide who will fill
the spots by the first MSA meeting
next term.

Two weeks ago, the results of
assembly elections were questioned
when it was discovered that defective
LSA and Board for Student Publica-
tions ballots had been distributed to
polling sites. One candidate's name
was left off Board ballots and as
many as four Choice candidates were
left off some LSA ballot sheets.
The justices also recommended
that MSA enact legislation to set a
time period for retaining future bal-
lots. Currently, there is no provision
in the MSA constitution that speci-
fies how long ballots should be re-
tained.
"We don't want to set a precedent
saying the court system condones
elections where people's rights are
violated, " CSJ Chief Justice Laura
Miller said.
The landmark decision was heard

because three losing Choice candi-
dates - Jason Krumholtz, Nick
Mavrick, and Jennifer Van Valey -
appealed the election court's finding.
Yesterday's decision surprised
both Choice and Conservative Coali-
tion candidates.
Mavrick, who was ecstatic upon
hearing the decision, said, "I'm
pleased that CSJ declared the election
results invalid because the election
results weren't representative of the
student constituency."
Van Valey called the decision
"fair" and added that she would have
supported the decision even if it had
been made in avor of the Coal-
tion's candidates. "Anybody should
have a right to a recount," she said.
However, MSA President Aaron
Williams called the appeal a
"childish action" by the losing can-
didates, explaining that if the votes

were recounted, the outcome would
not have been changed.
Conservative Coalition candidate
Joe Sciarotta agreed. "Panama has
'I'm pleased that CSJ
declared the election
results invalid be-
cause the election re-
sults weren't repre-
sentative of the stu-
dent constituency.'
- Choice candidate Nick
Mavrick

Tuesday had the appeal been denied,
said the judiciary's decision was po-
litically motivated.
"There are people on CSJ that
obviously don't want Conservative
Coalition members to take their
seats," Sciarotta said.
Election directors Michelle Put-
nam and Sumi Malhotra threw out
all election ballots one day after the
Election Court handed down a verdict
last week that the misprinted ballots
had not affected the outcome of the
elections. In their appeal, Choice
candidates claimed it was impossible
to contest this since all evidence had
been destroyed.
Putnam refused comment and
Malhotra could not be reached for
comment last night.
The now-invalid elections for
LSA seats saw the Conservative
Coalition score a decisive overall
victory, capturing 14 of 21 assembly
seats - including eight of the nine
LSA seats. The Choice party won
six total seats.

now come
Michigan,"
would have

to the University of
he said. Sciarotta, who
joined the assembly next

~.A. N
¢ '
4 414

n : > y~w ,Q
$ . p r ° t;

State panel urges
race relations class

Richard Eisen

Bowl win will make for
a Wolverine sandwich

By Vera Songwe
Daily Minority Issues Reporter
The Michigan Civil Rights
Commission yesterday recommended
that Michigan colleges develop a
"zero tolerance" policy in regards to
racism and require a course in ethnic
relations to improve campus race re-
lations.
The recommendations stemmed
from the commissions discussions
with administrators, students and
faculty from the University of
Michigan, and Michigan State, Fer-
ris State and Western Michigan uni-
versities.
"It is our hope that universities
will look at these recommendations
as a guide and use them to imple-
ment a program of this sort on their
campus," said Commission chair

Benny Napoleon yesterday.
The ethnic-relations class would
be required for all first-year students.
The class is supposed to sensitize
individuals to racial issues and con-
cems.
"I believe race relations should be
spread around in all courses not
stuffed into one," said Western
Michigan President Diether
Haenicke. "I don't think the course
would be very useful," he added.
At the University of Michigan, a
proposal for a student graduation re-
quirement on race, ethnicity, and
racism - written by Philosophy
Prof. Peter Railton - failed by a
140-120 faculty vote last April. The
proposal followed the United Coai-
tion Against Racism's March 19,87
See PROPOSAL, Page 2

by Richard Eisen
Daily Football Writer,
The Michigan Wolverines will
win the Rose Bowl for onei
important reason - because they're:
Michigan.
This reason never used to be a
valid one. I mean, Michigan never
won the big one. Never. Despite
fantastic regular season per-
formances, the Michigan football
team never went into the Rose Bowl
and kicked major tail.
Each winning year, it seemed,
Michigan would dominate the Big

Ten, beat Ohio State and then gag
once it hit the Rose Bowl grass.
Even when the Wolverines seemed
in control of the Rose Bowl game,
something would come out of left
field and screw things up.
Like good 'ol Charlie White, for
instance. Before he went on to screw
up his professional football career,
White threw a monkey wrench into
Michigan's well-oiled football
machine in 1979. You see, White
spiked the football before he got into
the end zone.
See EISEN, Page 16

FILE PHOIU
Michigan head coach Bo Schembechler hopes to continue his recent
Bowl success against the USC Trojans in the Rose Bowl.
Nt I
Trojan writer reflects
on his Michigan past

Allies cal
German
WEST BERLIN (AP) - The
four Allies of World War II held
their first meeting in 18 years yes-
terday and stressed the need for sta
bility at time of convulsive change
in East Germany, where the Com
munist Party has lost its grip.
The Soviet Union requested the
"Four Power" meeting of ambas-
sadors last week because of its con
cern about the rapid pace of events in
the Communist nation it create
after the war.
A joint statement issued afterward
said: "There was a common under
standing of the importance of stabil
ity, and confidence was expressed
that the United States, United King

11 for
stablity
dom, France and Soviet Union could
contribute to that on the basis of the
quadripartite agreement of 1971."
It was the first meeting since the
1971 session that produced the
agreement on improving the links
between West Germany and Berlin,
e which was isolated within East
- Germany.
- After World War II, the four vic-
torious Allies divided Berlin into
J four sectors. They still have the final
say in its affairs.
A Soviet diplomat in East Berlin
- said privately after Monday's 2-1/2
- hour conference: "In principle, for all
d the four powers, it was a very im-
See ALLIES, Page 2

By Jeff Bechphold
The Daily Trojan
I was born in Livonia and raised a
Michigan fan.
I've also been pretty fond of
Notre Dame throughout my life. But
at USC, where there is no basketball
program worth mentioning, football
is everything. And in four years of
cheering for and writing about USC
football, I have yet to see the
Trojans beat a team from Ann Arbor
or South Bend.
Needless to say, I'm pretty tired
of it.
Everyone knows the story of

USC and Notre Dame. The Trojans
played the Irish as well as anyone
this season, but came out of Indiana
a four-point loser.
In my first year, in 1986, Rodney
Peete and the Trojans pounded Lou
Holtz's team all day but lost on a
last second field goal.
But enough about the Irish. This
is Rose Bowl time and the two most
prolific Rose Bowl teams, USC and
Michigan, are preparing to square off
in Pasadena for the second straight
year.
For me, this matchup brings
See TROJIAN, page 16

USC coach Larry Smtih, once an assistant under Schembechler, is
looking to even his 0-1 record against his mentor.

Similar cast stars in Rose Bowl sequel

by Adam Benson
Daily Football Writer
It's like a movie sequel -
Michigan vs. USC in the Rose
Bowl, Part II.
"We ~ nnear.ly the c~aA tam ..

show will be a hit or a flop.
"I can do a lot of different things
to help our team," Taylor said. "Last
year, we basically gave the ball to
(running backs) Leroy (Hoard),

have a good day throwing. We can't
just throw for 100 yards (as Taylor
did against Ohio State) and beat
USC, we'll have to do better than
that."

Greg's and Chris' talents. We are
going to try and get them the ball.
Hopefully they'll be able to
contribute in this game, because we
are going to need them."
Mpani,1,ia th,.npc.a-mp T C'

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