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December 11, 1989 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-12-11

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Monday, December 11, 1989

i all for reform
-About 5,000 people gathered yesterday in Moscow to hear parliamentarians two days before the Congress of People's Deputies opens its second
session. Police did not disturb the peaceful rally and march.
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The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

I,

Tues. Dec. 12
-

University Symphony Orchestra,
Chamber Orchestra & Chamber
Choir
Gustav Meier & Theodore Morrison,
conductors
Brahms: Quartette, Op. 64
Morrison: Missa Brevis
Strauss: Thus sprach Zarathustra
Hill Auditorium, 8 PM
Musical Theatre Workshop
Brent Wagner, Director
Scenes and songs from Broadway musicals
McIntosh Theatre, School of Music, 8 PM
Please note date and time change.

DIVIDE
Continued from page 1
The studyralso reported that
Blacks are three times more likely
than whites to say that the position
of Blacks has gotten worse, and five
times likely to favor affirmative ac-
tion in hiring decisions.
"Beneficiaries of racism can't see
it. It is very difficult for a white man
to get up one morning and say 'I got
where I am not because I'm so great
but because there is a system which
eliminates my competition,"' said
Moody.
The study's results contrast the
commonly held belief that Blacks do
not participate in politics. Blacks
participate in groups and electoral
politics at about the same rate as
whites. Blacks out participate whites
in local community problems and
issues.
"Blacks participate when there is
a real choice. In Chicago for 20
years there was no turnout, but as
we can see in the recent voter
turnout, Blacks will participate when

a choice is offered." said Prof.
Michael Dawson.
Study participants said they
wanted to work with the community
in seeking out solutions for the dis-
parities, rather than just use it as a
subject for research.
"This is a watershed in research at
the University," said Rackham grad-
uate student Keith Reeves and DAS
researcher. "We have returned to the
community, and said 'this is what
we've found, let's go forward to-
gether."'
According to Principal Investiga-
tor Prof. Steven Rosenstone, the
conference was the first in the his-
tory of DAS to take place in Detroit.
"I hope its not another 38 years be-
fore the next one."
IFC
Continued from page 1
clear that they support the concept of
a dry rush, they have done nothing
to force the IFC to have one. The
idea of having a dry rush has been on
IFC's agenda for years."

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Baker advises caution for
reunification of Germany
WASHINGTON D.C. - Any efforts to rush the reunification of East
and West Germany would risk instability and violence, Secretary of State
James Baker said yesterday before leaving for urgent talks with allied lead-
ers on the rapid changes sweeping the Communist East.
"If it happens too abruptly, you run a greater risk that it might not
happen peacefully," Baker said.
Speaking on the ABC-TV program, "This Week with David Brinkley,"
Baker also predicted an increasing emphasis on the political aspect of the
NATO alliance as its military might becomes less important in the new
atmosphere. But he said there is no danger that U.S. forces will pull out
entirely.
Political uncertainty in East Germany "tends a bit, could tend, towards
instability," Baker said. "We've made it clear all along in this process that
we do not seek to take unilateral advantage of what's going on there
at the expense of the Soviet Union, and we want the process to continue
to unfold in a stable way."
Consent bill goes to Senate
LANSING, Mich. - Anti-abortion legislation is expected to clear its.
final legislative hurdle this week, but a promised veto from Gov. James
Blanchard will stop it from going any further.
The Senate is scheduled to give quick approval to a House-passed bill
to require unmarried girls less than 18 years old to obtain parental consent
before obtaining an abortion,
The Senate already has passed a similar bill, so backers skirted the
committee system to take the House bill directly to the Senate.
The bill would allow a girl to petition a probate court to have an abor-
tion if she can't tell her parents or if her parents refuse. But critics argue
few teens would understand how to get such court approval.
Blanchard has pledged to veto any bill restricting abortion rights, and
pro-choice forces are counting on the House being unable to override a
veto.
Report claims abortion is
often safer than childbirth
WASHINGTON D.C. - A congressional panel charged yesterday that
the federal government has failed to report evidence of the relative safety
of abortions for women.
A report released by a House committee also claimed the federal Cen-
ters for Disease Control has censored research on abortion, and urged the.
Department of Health and Human Services to assure public health researc'
is not affected by political judgments.
It also recommended increased federal support for contraceptive research
to help decrease the 1.5 million abortions obtained by American women
every year.
The report said the CDC five years ago stopped comparing the mortal-
ity and morbidity of women who had abortions with women carrying
pregnancy to term. Comparisons had indicated that women were between
seven and 25 times more likely to die from childbirth than from legal-
abortion, the report said.
Baker backs U.S.-China talks
WASHINGTON D.C. - Secretary of State James Baker yesterday
defended President George Bush's surprise decision to resume high-level
talks with China six months after Beijing's crackdown on pro-democracy.
demonstrators, saying Bush wants to keep the Chinese in the international
community.
Fighting criticism that the move was a giveaway to the Chinese gov-
ernment without any improvement in human rights, Baker insisted China
still will be asked to make changes before relations can return to the way
they were before the June protests.
The trip, by national security adviser Brent Scowcroft and Deputy Sec-
retary of State Lawrence Eagleburger was unannounced in advance and
outraged some in Congress who feel the U.S. should be just as supportive
of democracy movements in Asia as it is of those in Eastern Europe.
But Baker said without efforts to re-establish ties to China an impor
tant relationship could be lost.
EXTRAS
Christmas tree caper solved
INGLEWOOD, Calif. - The Grinch who stole Ricardo Hernandez'
Christmas tree couldn't steal Southern California's Christmas spirit. ,
Hernandez walked outside one day last week and found that someone
had chopped down the 12-foot-tall pine tree growing in his front yard that

the family had decorated every Christmas for the past 15 years.
On Friday, he walked out and found that someone had planted a new
one, standing 7 feet tall.
Hernandez though he was on the trail of the first tree's thief when he
tracked its scattered needles from his house to a nearby apartment. But the
apartment's occupants turned out to be a poor family who had thought
they had gotten a good deal on a Christmas tree.
"It was some old man with six kids," Hernandez said. "He said he had
bought the tree a little earlier for $7."
Hernandez didn't have the heart to take the tree back.

14

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Fri. Dec. 15

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All events free unless specified. Wheelchair accessible.
For up-to-date information on School of Music Events, call the
24-Hour Music Hotline - 763-4726

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The incomparable hospitality Shlejaton Long Beaph1

Crossword Puzzle
Love notes
Arnnouncements
Stuff for sale
S ummer sublets
International travel
Fabulous jobs
Incredible offers
Excellent results
Daring personals
Student services
...and much, much more!
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