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December 05, 1989 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-12-05

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NATO
Continued from page 1
Leaders herald new
era in world realtions
rope "in the bank" before seeking
deeper redluctions. He told NATO
leaders he hoped a multinational
summit could be convened in Europe
next summer to sign such an accord.
Conventional forces aside, the
United States and the Soviet Union
are negotiating a proposed 50 percent
cut in long-range nuclear weapons,
as well as a proposed ban of chemi-
cal weapons.
The president spoke as Gorbachev
was convening a meeting of a radi-
cally reordered Warsaw Pact in
Moscow to review the weekend
summit.
The dramatic change in Europe
continued uninterrupted during the
day, as the Soviet Union and the
four other Warsaw Pact nations con-
demned their own invasion of
Czechoslovakia in 1968. In Leipzig,
East Germany, about 200,000
demonstrators broke into wild rounds
of applause as speakers called for
German reunification.
Bush and Gorbachev leaders
agreed at a unprecedented joint news
conference before leaving Malta that
their meeting heralded a new era of
cooperation in East-West relations,
including arms control and trade.
They intend to meet again in the
United States in the second half of
June.
At his news conference, Bush
said, "We stand at the threshold of a
new era," but declined to assert the
Cold War has ended as Gorbachev
suggested.
"That day hasn't arrived," the
president said when asked about
Gorbachev's statement declaring an
end to the "epoch of the Cold War."
Barring a utopian development,
Bush said, "the United States must
stay involved" by keeping troops
massed against Warsaw Pact forces.
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"If you want to project out 100
years, or take some years off of that,
you can look to a utopian day when
there might be none (U.S. troops in
Europe)," he said. "But as I pointed
out to them (NATO leaders), that
day hasn't arrived - and they agree
with me."
Dutch Prime Minister Ruud
Lubbers said he was impressed by
the United States' "extraordinarily
positive attitude" towards events in
Europe.
"It has nothing to do with a 'we
are pulling out' attitude," he told re-
porters. "On the contrary, they are
again promising a meaningful pres-
ence (in Europe)."
The president began his news
conference with a statement that said
a "peaceful revolution" was taking
place in Eastern Europe, where five
hardline communist regimes have
fallen in recent weeks.
He said his goal was to see
"individual freedom everywhere re-
place coercion and tyranny."
Bush, apparently referring to dis-
agreements about CentraltAmerica,
said "all was not sweetness and
"The United States
and the Soviet Union
are negotiating a
proposed 50 percent
cut in long-range
nuclear weapons, as
well as a proposed
ban of chemical
weapons."
light" at the Malta summit, but took
pains to applaud Gorbachev's han-
dling of the change in Eastern Eu-
rope.

Congress

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 5, 1989 - Page 5
considers defense

cuts after East-

West summit

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) -
Despite a declaration yesterday by
President George Bush that he
doesn't expect a "peace dividend" to
result from reduced East-West ten-
sions, many members of Congress
are urging heftier spending on do-
mestic programs as the military
budget is reduced.
"We have a lot of demands at
home, and there's no question about
that," Bush said at a news conference
in Brussels at the end of trip to a
summit with Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev. "But I think it is prema-
ture to speak as some are at home
about a peace dividend - take a lot
of money out of defense and put it
into other worthy causes."
The president said the reason
there can be no such windfall was
that the Gramm-Rudman deficit-re-
duction law requires that he produce
a budget for fiscal 1991 containing a
shortfall of no more than $64 bil-
lion.
The deficit for this budget year,
which ends Sept. 30 is projected at
about $110 billion. Bush will pre-
sent his proposed budget to
Congress on Jan. 22.
"There just isn't a lot of , quote,
excess money, unquote, floating
around there," Bush told a news con-
ference in Brussels.
Although members of Congress
are split over the question, many be-
lieve it is time to impose deep cuts
on the nearly $290 billion defense
budget, which comprises about one-
fourth of the government's $1.2 tril-
lion annual spending.
They cite three reasons: the eas-
ing of Cold War tensions, the need
to shrink the deficit and a desire to
replenish domestic programs that
have been hit hard by Reagan-era
spending cuts.

"The more you cut from the mili-
tary, the less damage you do to do-
mestic programs to meet Gramm-
Rudman targets," Rep. Barney
Frank, (D-Mass.), said yesterday.
Frank has been a leader of a
group of liberals pressing congres-
sional leaders to slash about $20 bil-
lion off the Pentagon's budget and
redistribute most of it among health,
housing, education and other domes-
tic programs..
Conservative Rep. Sonny Mont-
gomery, (D-Miss.) chair of the
House Veterans Affairs Committee,
told reporters yesterday that he would
like to see next year's defense spend-
ing frozen at 1990 levels and envi-
sions savings by eventually bringing
some U.S. troops home from Eu-
rope.
"If we do have these extra monies
I would like for them to go into the

national debt and take about half the
money and use it for domestic pro-
grams in the United States," Mont-
gomery said.
Since Frank's group made its
proposals, Defense Secretary Dick
Cheney has begun considering plans
to shrink expected military spending
rates by up to $180 billion over the
next three to five years.
Since 1986, military spending
has decreased by an average of three
percent annually when inflation is
taken into account, even though the
actual amount of money going to
the Pentagon has increased each year.
Defense Department outlays, $265
billion in 1986, should reach $287
billion this year.
The cuts Cheney is examining
would not literally cut defense spend-
ing. Rather, they would slow the
rate by which military spending

would otherwise increase. Many on
Capitol Hill believe that in the
end,the amount of money going to
the Pentagon will remain at about
$290 billion for each of the next
several years.
rea
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INFORMATION MEETINGS FOR:
1989-90 Study Abroad Programs

SNEAK

PREVIEW

9

F

I L

I n :

..

0 --- A

I

SEVILLE, SPAIN (Academic Year)
Wednesday, December 6th
3201 Angell Hall - 7-9pm
SEVILLE, SPAIN (Summer)
Thursday, December 7th
4th Floor Commons MLB -5-6:30pm
OXFORD, ENGLAND (summer)
Thursday, December 7th
7th Floor Conference Room -Haven Hall
5-6:30 pm
LONDON, ENGLAND (Summer)
Thurday, December 7th
3201 Angell Hall -7-9pm
FLORENCE, ITALY
(Spring, Summer, & Academic Year)
Monday, December 11th
Auditorium 3 - MLB -7-9pm

Thursday, December 7
Angell Hall Auditorium A
8:00pm
Join us at Of'Sullivan's Eatery & Pub
and receive your complimentary tickets
to see....
The con is on.
ROBERT DE NIRO SEAN PENN
WE'RE N0 ANGELS

yi M *si
:'i we 4
" ll* *

Escaped convicts
disguised as priests.
ICUi take a miracle
to get away
with this one.

DEMI MOORE

PARAMOUNT PICTURES PESENTS AN ART LINSONmoouno A NEILJORDANFars ROBERT DE NIRO " SEAN PENN WE'RE NO ANGELS
HOYT AXTON" BRUNO KIRBY - RAY McANALLY - JAMES RUSSO ANODDEMI MOORE GEORGE FENTON u PHILIPPE ROUSSELOT 'K WOLF KROEGER
c..FRED CARUSO t ROBERT DE NIRO "- DAVID MAMET N ART LINSON "' NEIL JORDAN A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
OPENING NATIONALLY DECEMBER 15TH
*aSullivan's is now serving espresso and cappuccino
-- - - -.. _ _"fA. . A a0Ma

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