100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 07, 1989 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition - Thursday, September 7, 1989
Residence halls to begin
mandatory recycling

by Ann Eveleth
Daily Staff Writer
Don't throw this newspaper away
when you're finished reading it. And
don't throw away that next pizza box
either. Recycle them instead, as part
of the University of Michigan's new
residence hall recycling program.
Starting this fall, all residence
halls, including the food service
kitchens, will participate in the first
phase of the University's recycling
program. The program, along with
its $150,000 price tag, were ap-
proved by the University Board of
Regents in February.
The regents' decision followed
closely the Ecology Center's pro-
posal for a mandatory recycling ordi-
nance for all Ann Arbor residents.
That proposal will be reviewed a
second time by the City Council
September 18, said City Council
Administration Coordinator Jan
Chaplin.
Buck Marks, the waste recycling
coordinator of the University

Grounds and Refuse Department
said, "If the program is as successful
as we hope, we'll be within the
city's (proposed) guidelines." If the
ordinance is passed it will unlikely
have an impact on the University,
according to Marks, but he added,
"we would want to act in the spirit
of what the community is doing."
Although the proposed ordinance
mandates for more extensive recy-
cling than the present University's
program, further expansion of the
program is planned for fall of 1990.
This year, the residence halls will
begin recycling newspapers, corru-
gated cardboard, pizza boxes, and
computer paper from the residence
hall computer clusters. Containers
such as glass bottles, tin cans, and
other refuse will be included in phase
two of the plan next year.
According to Linda Goldenhar, a
doctoral student in the School of
Public Health who is studying the
situation, pizza boxes account for 8-
10 percent of residence hall waste

Marks said, "It is primarily a
housing program right now, as we
don't have the resources to include
the academic and administration
buildings," but he added that he
hoped to organize a project which
would include the campus computer
centers.
"There has been interest and co-
operation from the computer center
staffs," he said. This project would
be organized throughout the fall as
time permits.
Spending for the program will be
divided between the Housing Divis-
ion and the Plant and Refuse
Department, but the cost will trickle
down to students living in campus
housing. The rate increase will be
$15 per student in residence halls
and $5 per family in campus apart-
ments annually. The difference is due
to the more intense program in the
halls.
"The quality of the materials that
students produce is essential for the
programs success," said Marks.

AMIT SHANJDaily
The University hopes its program for mandatory recycling in all residence halls will help ease the burden on tne
city's landfill. Students this fall will be expected to recycle newspapers and pizza boxes.

Students will be responsible for sort-
ing out recyclable materials and
moving them to hall waste closets.
The University has organized two
task forces for implementation and
education, and for waste disposal
procedures, in order to ensure the

program's success.
To encourage student participation
and education about recycling, sev-
eral positions will be available this
fall for work-study, internships, and
independent study activities. One
such position will be the Housing

HEYWO

LV

E R

NES-

WE'VE GTYYOR C

-ORS

Recycling Liaison, who would hold
educational training sessions for
dormitories, as well as following up
on the participation of both students
and staff.
Other priorities of the task force
include the provision of graduate and
undergraduate study programs for
students who wish to prepare for a
career in integrated waste manage-
ment.
WELCOME TO ANN ARBOR
FROMTHE
JEWISH CULTURAL SOCIET
We are a Secular Humanist
organization offering secular
celebrations of Jewish holidays,
weddings, and life cycle events.
Call us at: 665-5761
Affiliated with the Congress of Secular
Jewish Organizations.
PASS
IT
AROUND!

0

i n(L7

]

I ;-.j

THIS
TH E
UNIVERSITY
ACTIVITIES
CENTER
COLLEGE BOWL
COMEDY COMPANY
DEBATE
HOMECOMING
IMPACT JAZZ DANCE
LAUGHTRACK
MEDIATRICS
MICHIGRAS 3
MINI COURSES
MUSKET
SOPH SHOW
SOUNDSTAGE
SPECIAL EVENTS
STARBOUND
TECH CREW
TICKET CENTRAL
, ,tii t Bf i ... ,i ..

rwk, tow, I I towkt r) E: O/n

Entire stock of University of Michigan team sportswear! Hey
Wolverines! When it comes to back-to-school spirit - we're apparel of fun!
Choose from a larqe assortment of universi-tees, tank tops, sweatshirts,

I i

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan