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January 16, 1989 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-16

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 16, 1989 - Page7

Health
Continued from Page 1
rollments higher than the University
average of 15.4 percent.
0 The Medical School is highest, at
27.4 percent, up three points from a
year ago. The College of Pharmacy
rose to 17.1 percent minority en-
roHment, up from 14.7 last year.
cThe only school to see a drop in
minority enrollment was the Dental
School, reporting 17.7 percent mi-
nority enrollment, down from 18.2
percent. However, overall enrollment
*in the Dental School also declined.
In the schools below the Univer-
sity average, the School of Public
Health had 14.7 percent minority en-
rollment, up from the previous year's
104 percent.
The School of Nursing is the
lowest, with 8.1 percent minority
enrollment, but that is up from 6.4
percent.
*CLASSIFIED ADS
ROOMMATES
HELPI NEED ROOMMATE for apt. 3 m
walk to Union. Cheap! Call 995-3720.
MALE ROOMMATED WANTED to share
1 bdrm. ap. in Univ. Towers. 4 mo. lease
$295 a month. Jan. rent is FREE. Call Tom
665-0050 or Chris 930-6244.
MALZE TO SHARE one room apt. 7 min. to
*BECS Building--great price 769 7256.
SEEK RESPONSIBLE gay male to share
quiet house at low rent in exchansse for some
duties. Car priveleges possible. 429-9075.
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED to share one
room in a 3 Win ap Great location. Call
995-3545. Ask for David.

1988 Enrollments for University Professional Schools by race

Dental
8.66%
6.93%
0.43%
1.73%
82.25%

Medical Nursing Pharmacy Public Health
8.52% 3.86% 3.31% 6.16% 7.67%
0.41 % 8.06% 4.08%
14.23% 00% 0.49%
.55~ 2.84% 2.45%
o J
0.93%
3.74%
72.59% 91.87% 82.94% 85.32%°

Speech stresses
Women's roles in
rights movement

Black

m

Asian

Native American

Hispanic

[ White

Some percentage changes may be
much larger than the actual numerical
changes because overall enrollment
figures are small. None of the
schools has over 1,000 students en-
rolled.
All figures were provided by the
office of the University's Vice Presi-
dent for Academic Affairs.
One recommendation, now put
into practice, was for schools to
work together in a concerted recruit-
ment effort. To attract more minority
students to graduate education in the
health sciences, the schools mailed
about 3,000 invitations to minority
students living in residence halls to
attend "dorm nights," said Donald
Strachen, assistant dean for admis-
sions in the Dental School and a task
force member. About 30-40 people

attended a dorm night in Mary
Markley residence hall last week, he
said.
Four dorm nights were held last
semester, and another is planned for
this semester. They are seen as a way
to "build some linkages early in un-
dergraduate careers" between minority
students and faculty members, said
Dr. Margaret Woodbury, assistant
dean for student and minority affairs
in the Medical School and a task
force member.
Woodbury was one of several
people to accompany Charles
Moody, vice provost for minority
affairs, to Chicago last fall for a
"University of Michigan Day." Rep-
resentatives of the University held an
open house and invited a select group
of Chicago-area minority students.

Woodbury said this was another
opportunity for prospective students
to meet faculty members. Other "U
of M Days" in cities with large mi-
nority populations will be planned in
the future, she said.
"There's always a concern... that
[a report; can become a shelf job,"
said Margaret Warrick, director of
student services in the School of
Public Health and a member of the
task force. To prevent the
recommendations from being ne-
glected, a group of original commit-
tee members and specially appointed
individuals will meet regularly to
ensure that the recommendations of
the report get implemented.
Tomorrow: A look at what pro-
grams the individual health science
schools have implemented.

BY NICOLE SHAW
Women who have influenced the
civil rights movement were honored
Friday as the University's Com-
memoration of a Dream Committee
continued its celebration of
MLK/Diversity Day.
Gloria House, former member of
the Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee (SNCC) in Alabama, led
about 50 students and faculty mem-
bers in a discussion about women
civil rights leaders, including Rosa
Parks and Ella Baker.
House dispelled the long-held no-
tion that women played a minimal
part in the Civil Rights Movement.
Men and women were equals in the
movement, she said, because "they
were willing to risk their lives for
the cause, and so were we. We
claimed our equality and worked out
of our equality."
House then discussed the role
SNCC played in the Alabama Civil
Rights Movement. That group, she
said, eventually affected the entire
nation because "SNCC inspired you
to go out and be active because you
knew you were right."
House said people should
"understand the atmosphere Blacks
had to work under to make change."
She described the violence, terrorism,
and economic threats Blacks endured
to survive and make change. At one

point, local whites who objected to
the civil rights movement would fire
guns at SNCC members' homes
nightly, she said.
In the early '60s, Alabama was
about 85 percent Black, yet the state
had no Black elected representatives,
House said.
But to offset the white
supremacist-led Democratic party,
House said SNCC organized its own
section of the Democratic party and
by 1966 the first Black was elected to
office. In 1968, a Black sheriff was
elected. "A good deal of national
sentiment was driven on by what
happened in Alabama in the 1960s,"
House said.
Before House's discussion, a film
on Ella Baker was shown outlining
more than 20 years of service she
gave to the civil rights movement.
Baker fought to gain freedom and
equality for Blacks by traveling
through the southern states, making
speeches and rallying people to ac-
tion.
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

CLASSIFIED ADS! Call 764-0557

REGISTRAR'S BULLETIN BOARD

t!

University of Michigan Library
Bentley Historical Library
School of Information and Library Studies present

DATES TO REMEMBER
DEADLINES:
Wed., Jan. 25 is the last day to:

WITHDRAW FROM WINTER TERM - with

payment of the $50 disenrollment fee and $60 registration fee.
DROP CLASSES - with a reduction in tuition and
without a $10 change of election fee. NOTE: Some units
(Law, Medicine and Dentistry) begin classes on a different
academic calendar and this date will vary for those units.
Wed., Feb. 15 is the last day to: WITHDRAW FROM WINTER TERM - with
payment of half tuition and $60 registration fee. NOTE: This
date will vary for the units having a different academic
calendar.

BEGINNING
Thur., Jan. 26
IThur., Feb. 16

WITHDRAW FROM WINTER TERM - pay half of
tuition and $60 registration fee. This fee adjustment applies
only to complete withdrawals from the term and not to a re-
duction of credit hours.
$10 Change of Election Fee Due - payable in advance at the
Cashier's Office for drops, adds or modifications to Winter
term schedule.
WITHDRAW FROM WINTER TERM - pay full
tuition and fees.

Gwendolyn
B rook's
Poet Laureate of Illinois
Pulitzer Prize Winner
b
2:00 pm
Monday, January 16, 1989
Michigan Union Ballroom
Diversity Day Symposium
Blacks in the Arts:
Resources for Diversity
Also appearing:
Maurice Wheeler Detroit Public Library
Deirdre Spencer U-M Fine Arts Library
Christine Weideman Bentley Historical
Library

STUDENTS GRADUATING IN APRIL
Students anticipating April 1989 graduation should make application for their
diplomas at the earliest possible date in order to ensure their inclusion in the
graduation program and the timely receipt of their diploma.

ADDRESS CHANGES

i

IF YOU HAVE CHANGED YOUR LOCAL OR
PERMANENT ADDRESS, BE SURE TO NOTIFY
THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE.

ElL
-I_ _

w '

w1

UNION
ARTS AND PROGRAMMING
presents
ANDEAN ART

r ~

Sweaters and Jewelry
from

Latin America

L _ 1 rir" "- - 7 z .-..I

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