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April 19, 1989 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-04-19

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Page 12 -The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, April 19, 1989

Elvis
Continued from Page 9
Spike opens brand new worlds to
"The Beloved Entertainer" - that's
the inscription under his harlequin
grin on the album cover. A collec-
tion of new songs that touch all the
bases of human passion, it is or
nearly is his best work to date. Bran-
Elvis Costello writes his
songs the way John Donne
wrote poems 350 years
ago.... Like Donne, he's
got a huge ego. Like
Donne's, it is counterbal-
anced by an equally size-
able sense of humor.
dishing a new Righteous Brother-
deep singing voice, he delivers 14
(15 on CD and cassette) hate- and
love- letters with refreshing di-

rectness. Whereas his earlier master-
pieces, particularly Imperial Bedroom
and This Year's Model, could only
soar as high as his mediocre backup
band The Attractions would allow, he
surrounds himself with the best and
the brightest for this project. Paul
McCartney, (who co-wrote
"Veronica" and the rockabilly shuffle
"Pads, Paws and Claws") Nawlins
ivory tickler Allan Toussaint, The
Dirty Dozen Brass Band, and mem-
bers of Tom Waits' band all turn in
superb performances.
Probably aware of the
impossibility of assembling a tour-
ing band to duplicate these awesome
studio sounds, Elvis plays Hill Fri-
day night in the raw. A chance to
catch the mercurial Liverpudlian in a
solo performance could be as bracing
an experience as witnessing Doctor
Donne whip up a sermon at St.
Paul's Cathedral. If you're lucky
enough to hold tickets for the show,
expect the best and you won't be
disappointed. Remember who we're
talking about...
ELVIS COSTELLO, with special
guest Nick Lowe appears at Hill
Auditorium Friday night at 8 pm.
The concert is sold out.

Winter
BY DAVID LUBLINER
Try to imagine what it might be
like if the Waltons and Swiss Family
Robinson were pitted against each
other in a tale of violent family n-
valry. It is insanity of this sort
which abounds in Winter People, the
latest effort from director Ted Kotch-
eff (Rambo-First Blood, Switching
Channels). The film, set against the
Blue Ridge Mountains, tells the
story of Collie Wright, an unwed
mother living in isolation with her
baby boy, and her controversial rela-
tionship with Wayland Jackson, a
stranger in this "not-so-friendly"
community.
It is obvious from the early going
that these people aren't too receptive
to newcomers. After Wayland Jack-
son, played by Kurt Russell (The
Mean Season, Tequila Sunrise), and
his ten-year-old daughter Paula are
forced to leave their broken-down car
behind in a stream, a gang of thieves
who look like they haven't bathed for
weeks vandalize the automobile and
take off with whatever is left of their

People
belongings.
Kelly McGillis (Witness, The
Accused) plays Collie Wright, the
woman who allows Wayland to seek
shelter in her remote cabin.
McGillis' mysterious character is in-
teresting at first, as we are provided
with only bits and pieces from her
past. However, she soon falls into
the trap of overacting. This perfor-
mance doesn't have the same intricate
subtleties which made her portrayal
of an Amish woman in Witness so
appealing.
The film remains intriguing while
the romance between Russell and
McGillis develops. Russell is rather
convincing as a sensitive clockmaker
who merely wishes to bring happi-
ness and peace to Collie's life. Ulti-
mately, the father of Collie's baby,
Cole, returns and finds this stranger
living with her. It is at this point in
the film that the story unfortunately
shifts direction and centers on the
ridiculous competition between Col-
lie's family and Cole's family, t
Campbells.

comes up
This laughable rivalry is ex- and His D
tremely unbelievable and contrived. Unlike th
The Campbells are presented as a cast, he b
barbaric group of murderers while the Bridges a
Wrights appear to be civilized, yet sophistica
seriously concerned, about the intra- perately ne
family squabble. These characters are In the en
poorly developed and purely one-di- a mocker
mensional. The story is based on the doesn't d
John Ehle novel of the same name talent whi
which received wide acclaim when it and McGi
was published in 1982. Something talented p
must have been lost in its translation ingly putt
into film. they too be
The only bright spot amidst this rest in ove
motley crew is Lloyd Bridges, who implausibl
plays Collie's father William, the WINTER
wise leader of the Wright clan. Ann Arbor
Bridges (Cousins, Tucker: The Man Cinemas.

cold
ream) is excellent as usual.
e rest of the supporting
rings his character alive.
dds a bit of experience and
tion which this film des-
eds.
nd, Winter People becomes
ry of itself. The script
o justice to the wealth Qf
ch is present here. Russell
llis, two of today's more
erformers, are disappoint-
to waste. And eventually,
ecome just as guilty as the
erdramatizing this pitifully
e story.

PEOPLE is playing at
r Theaters and Showcase

P-

CLASSIFIED ADSI

Call 764-0557

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Save $ on your Spring Shoe Needs
Entries for door prizes available at participating S.U. merchants. No
purchase necessary.

SHOE HUT

1208 South University

769-2088

(an interdenominational campus fellowship)
Students Dedicatedto
┬žKowintg antd Commuictating
Yesus Christ
Weekly Meetings: Thursdays: 7:00 p.m.
439 Mason Hall
John Neff-747-8831
STUDENT ACCOUNTS: Your attention is called to the
following rules passed by the Regents at their meeting on
February 28, 1936: "Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last day of classes of each
semester or summer session. Student loans which are not
paid or renewed are subject to this regulation; however,
students' loans not yet due are exempt. Any unpaid ac-
counts at the close of business on the last day of classes
will be reported to the Cashier of the University and
(a) All academic credits will be withheld, the grades
for the semester or summer session just completed will not
be released, and no transcript of credits will be issued.
(b) All students owng such accounts will not be al-
lowed to register in any subsequent semester or summer
session until payment has been made."

A

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* ub urba n
POMTIAC * CADILLAC
CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS!

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SUNBIRD GT
CONVERTIBLE

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LEFT

OFF
Parking
Tickets
Tickets received before
Jan. 1, 1989* are eligible.
(*Some exceptions) Call
the Ann Arbor Amnesty
Program Hotline:
994-2567 or 994-2576

FIREBIRD COUPE
REBATE up to $1600 or

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2.9% Financing
PONTIAC
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COME CELEBRATE THE END OF CLASSES
WITH THE BEST OF
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Stad Up Comedy
Featuring...

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LX 4-DOOR SEDAN

HEYWOOD

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FEATURED ON H.B.O.'s YOUNG COMEDIAN'S SPECIAL
AND IN L.A.'s HOTTEST COMEDY CLUBS!
And The Best Student Comedians of 1988-89.

PETER BERMAN
TOM FRANCK

RICH EISEN
JON GLASER

Wednesday April 19
10:00 pm

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