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April 14, 1989 - Image 10

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

r

Softball
vs. Indiana
Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Varsity Diamond

SPORTS

Football
Spring Game
Saturday, 1 p.m.
Michigan Stadium
Page 10-'

The Michigan Daily Friday, Ap
'M' softball team to battle for
first place against Indiana

ril 14, 1989

BY JONATHAN SAMNICK
The two teams sitting atop the
fence of the Big Ten softball
standings, Michigan and Indiana
University, resume where they left
off at the end of last season, with
doubleheaders today and tomorrow.
While the eighth-ranked Wol-
verines count on their seniors and
experienced group of younger
players, Indiana finds its strength in
its enthusiastic group of rookies.
In addition to each team's 4-2
conference mark, the Wolverines are
24-10 overall, and the Hoosiers stand
at 18-11. The games this weekend
promise a battle not only between
two of the best teams in the Big Ten
but two of the most evenly matched.
Both teams find that their success
lies in their pitching strength.
Michigan relies upon senior Andrea
Nelson, who has a 17-3 overall
record and a 2-1 Big Ten record.
Nelson also posts a 0.80 ERA for
the season which includes a near
perfect 0.27 ERA in the Big Ten.
"To counter Andrea Nelson, we
have (pitcher) Theresa Raine who
has not given up a run in the Big
Ten this season," said Indiana head
coach Diane Stephenson.
ALONG with Raine, Indiana has

2'

/

can be seen in the statistics. As a
team Michigan is hitting .266 and
holding its opponents to a .198
average. The Hoosiers are hitting
.261 while holding their opposition
to an equally paltry .183.
"We lost five seniors form last
year's team," Indiana coach Steph-
enson said, "and now we have five
freshmen starting. But we do have
our entire pitching staff returning."
The fifth rookie is starting due to
a knee injury that junior catcher
Margie Ledgerwood suffered earlier
in the year. The Hoosiers are hoping
that Ledgerwood will be back for
this weekend's games.
Leading Indiana's group of
newcomers is Jene Skarzynski. She
is the team's leading hitter with a
.333 batting average, while putting
in time at both second base and
shortstop.
"They have the home field
advantage and they'll probably be
motivated," (Indiana swept Michigan
in the final series of last year),
Stephenson said. "But there is no
dominant team. Whoever can put the
ball between the lines is going to
win."

Allard
a pitching staff which goes four
deep. Quite a contrast to the Wol-
verines, who rely primarily upon
Nelson and junior Jenny Allard who
is this week's Big Ten Player-of-the-
Week and Michigan's leading hitter.
Other Hoosier standout hurlers are
junior Jill Jensen and sophomore
Christy Brown.
The similarities of the two teams

F-ie Photo
Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler will have much to ponder after he sees his squad play in its
first scrimmage this weekend. The team opens its regular season September 16, against Notre Dame.
Wolverines to scrimmage in
annual Spring football game

4

ILinksters travel to Ohio

'State,
gY THEODORE COX
The Michigan men
against the rest oft
Intercollegiate Tourna
through Sunday on Ohi
r. Though The Scarle
will be the most deman
<in this year, Michiganc
lIe a plus for Michigan.
"Generally speakin
bd/or teams," Carrass
on a golf course last we
dstinct advantage. If h
4)uld score as well as a
Junior John Ngw~y
Iatel, Bob Papp, Chris
tip as the fifth man for
"John right now is

for Big Ten tourney
's golf team will tee-off today help us out on this particular course," Carras said.
the Big Ten at the Kepler "Overall his play has been better than the rest of the
ment. The squad will compete guys."
o State's Scarlet golf course. Michigan will be up against more than twenty
t's championship-type terrain squads. Besides the Big Ten schools, the rest of the
ding course the team has played field will be comprised of a majority of the MAC
coach Jim Carras feels this will conference universities, and a large number of the
Kentucky colleges.
g, it favors the better players Ohio State will present the biggest challenge for
said. "For example, we played Michigan. The Buckeyes beat the Wolverines last
ek that the average player had a week in the squads' first confrontation. This match
e had just a little bit of luck, he will be even tougher since Ohio will be playing at
nybody." home.
will join the 'P' players, Hersh "We're accustomed to this course, and that will
Pond, and Tom Paton, on the help," said Ohio State golf coach Jim Brown. "I'll be
r Michigan. very disappointed if we don't win it all, but I'm
nrobably the best canidate to disappointed anytime we don't win."

BY RICHARD EISEN
All right, put away those
basketballs. Shove those Seattle
victories into your memory banks.
It's time to deal with the present.
It's time for the three yards and a
cloud of dust.
It's time for Bo's Boys to shine.
Michigan football coach Bo
Schembechler recently said he hopes
the championship feeling garnered
by the basketball team might spill
over into the football season. This
Saturday at Michigan Stadium, the
public will get its first chance to see
this championship spirit displayed at
the Spring Football game.
Despite the fact that Schembech-
ler and his squad enter the season
Rose Bowl champions, there are
many questions to answer and voids
to fill due to graduation and injuries.
Once again, the Wolverine quar-
terback spot is up in the air. Last
week, Demetrius Brown broke his
hand in practice, muddling up the
picture even further. But for now,
there are a myriad of candidates look-

ing to take the snaps for Michigan
next season.
ONE TEAM on Saturday will be
spearheaded by Michael Taylor, who
started at quarterback last year until
he was derailed by a collarbone
injury, and Ken Sollom.
The other squad will be led by
junior Wilbur Odom and sophomore
Elvis Grbac.
"We're all set at quarterback,"
Schembechler said. "We'd like to
have Demetrius, it's an injury that
should not keep him out very long.
But he missed three weeks of prac-
tice and he needed those three weeks
because there was tough competition
in there for the quarterback job."
For now the quarterback position
seems to be the least of Schem-
bechler's worries. The coach's main
concerns are focused on the offensive
line, defensive secondary and the
kicking game.
GRADUATION decimated the
line, taking away all-Big Ten offen-
sive linemen John Vitale and Mike
Husar, and tight end Jeff Brown.

Since then, Michigan has had to
place young players into the offen-
sive line, leading Schembechler to
worry how long it might take for the
unit to gel into a functioning group.
"We put some young freshmen
into those positions - they have
potential but boy, it takes a long
time to really have them come
along," Schembechler said.
Schembechler glanced over the"
defensive secondary, calling it not:
"completely set," but seemed grave,
over the kicking game.
"One area where we've had com-'
plete failure is the kicking game, it
has not gone well," Schembechler=
lamented. "Particularly the punt.
"(Placekicker) J.D. Carlson has
played extremely well, so we're
probably all right at place kicking.;
But I'm still concerning with the;
punting game."
For every Spring Football ticket
sold, one dollar will be donated to
"Leaders in Prevention," an organ-
ization established to combat drug'
and alcohol abuse. 4

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I

prelim for league competition second

Knoxville meet offers Blue a

BY JODI LEICHTMAN
The members of the Michigan
women's track team look to improve
their results of last weekend when
they compete at the Dogwood.Invi-
tational in Knoxville, Tennessee
today and tomorrow.
The whole team will be attending
the non-scoring meet. Each team
member will be able to see how her
performance ranks in relation to the
representatives from 50 collegiate
southern and midwestern teams.
Past olympians and top non-college
tracksters will also be competing in
the events of the weekend.
"Our goal," said head coach James
Henry, "is tuning ourselves to com-
pete against the schools in our
conference."
Henry expects to see his top three
team members, Mindy Rowand,

welkinpresens
productions
Mlk +TheCh a1 C5

Sonya Payne, and Kirsten Engel-
brecht, improve their times and
distances over last weeks' results. He
also hopes to see Kim Haluscsak and
Karen Welke place high amongst
their competitors in the distance
events.
Considering the cold weather the
Wolverines have been faced in recent
weeks, the race course should prove
to be under ideal weather conditions
- not too hot, yet not too cold.
Added Henry, "The perfect wea-
ther for a Michigan team. Knowing
this, I think the team might be more
relaxed and excited for this weekend's
meet."
PASS
IT
AROUIND!

Abbott

loses,
start:

for Angels
Anaheim, Calif. (AP)
California's Jim Abbott improved
on his shaky major league debut, but;
opposing pitcher Mike Moore al-
owed no runs and three hits in eight
innings Thursday as the Oakland
Athletics beat the Angels 5-0.
Abbott, who made his pro debut
with a four and two-thirds inning;
stint in a 7-0 loss to Seattle last:
Saturday night, pitched six innings
against Oakland. Again getting no
hitting support, Abbott allowed four;
runs, two unearned, and nine hits.
He walked two and struck out four.
Abbott was relieved by Dan PetrysE
to start the seventh after he allowed'
three runs in the sixth.
Moore, 1-1, walked one and,
struck out seven before he was'
relieved by Dennis Eckersley at the
start of the ninth inning. Moore,:
who was 66-96 in seven seasons'
with Seattle, signed as a free agent,
with Oakland for $3.95 million overt
three years.
Dave Henderson gave the A's a 1-
0 lead with a two-out, homer in the:
first inning. Oakland made it 4-0:.
with three runs in the sixth, on Dave,
Parker's RBI groundout and a two-':
run double by Mike Gallego.

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DEPARTMENTS OF ENGUSH, TELECOMMUNiCATIONS, HUMANITIES, & THE HONORS COLLEGE

";; .. .
1a o 00":0

PRESENT

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THE 1989 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT
FILM
FESTIVAL

The Michigan Daily
Commemorative Sports Issue
Eight Jam-Packed pages full of special
Rose Bowl and NCAA coverage of

paul young mike rutherford peter van hooke

paul carrack

adrian lee

tim renwick

c~a a ~At THE FSCAPE CLUE

3

Michigan Victories

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