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April 14, 1989 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-04-14

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 14, 1989 - Page 5

Group to air problems
of global warming

BY VINCE WILK
Ever wonder why five of the
hottest years in recorded history have
occurred in this decade?
A campus group wants to bring
attention to global warming as a
problem which is occurring now.
Unless something is done, many
foresee disaster.
On Friday, April 21 at noon, a
Pilot Program class in planet
management will plant a tree in front
of the Natural Resources building to
symbolize the problem of global
warming.
Jim Hartman, a graduate student
in the Department of Natural Re-
sources, teaches this Pilot Program
class in Alice Lloyd Hall. "Jim
told us to think globally and act lo-
cally," said Adam Lilling, LSA first
year student.
"People think that they can't
make a difference with this global
issue," said David Schemeltz, LSA
sophomore and member of the class.

"If you are motivated, and get in-
volved, you can see the results."
Several University administrators
are scheduled to speak, and literature
describing the problem and offering
solutions will also be distributed.
Turner's Nursery and Landscape in
Ann Arbor has donated a ten foot
Norway Maple, and the class has
raised money to pay for a
commemorative plaque to be placed
on a stone bench.
Global warming, once thought to
be a problem of the future, is occur-
ring now, said James Hansen of
NASA's Goddard Institute for Space
Studies.
Statistics from the State of the
World, a research organization, pre-
dict that between the years 2030 and
2050, average temperatures could be
three to eight degrees Fahrenheit
higher than recent decades, which
will be the warmest that the earth
will have been for two million years.
The sea level could also rise 20 to
40 inches, threatening billions of

people who live on coastlines.
The organization predicts massive
crop failures from an increasing
number of droughts and floods. The
costs to combat these failures, the
group estimates, could total 200 bil-
lion dollars.
The group has identified the
burning of fossil fuels and rain-
forests, which release carbon dioxide,
as some of the causes of global
warming. Another cause is the re-
lease of methane gas and chlo-
roflourocarbons used in air
conditioners and aerosols.
To help solve the problem, State
of the World recommends that more
trees be planted to increase the size of
forests, paper be recycled to save vir-
gin timber, and forests be maintained
to delay climate changes.
The planting of the Norway
Maple is an attempt to begin work-
ing toward these solutions.
"On a small scale, we're making a
difference ourselves," said Carrie
Brownstein, LSA first year student.

ROBIN LOZNAK/Dolly-

Vietnam veteran Charles Tackett prepares for his walk around the country.

Tackett to march across U.S.

in

protest of society's

BY GIL RENBERG
Local Vietnam War veteran
Charles Tackett, in an attempt to
"let America know how much (it)
has deteriorated," will begin march-
ang throughout the continental
United States June 1 to point out
what he sees as some of society's
major problems.
The trek, whose length Tackett
estimates between 15,000 and
18,000 miles, will lead him to 47
state capitals. He said he will be on
the road for at least 12 months as he
zigzags across the country, trying to
gain support for his causes.
Tackett intends for his march,
named, "The March for America and
the Constitution - Lest We For-
get," to promote peace and human
rights, as well as to point out
"problems" in veterans organiza-
tions. Human suffering all over the
world needs to be stopped, said
Tackett.
The march is for "government is-
sues, veterans issues, all issues in
general," said Tackett.
Tackett accused many social or-
ganizations and interest groups of

"leeching off problems and not
solving them," although he declined
to name any specific groups. He said
that the worst of these organizations
are "the ones that cover veterans is-
sues, homeless issues, hunger is-
sues. Actually, social issues in gen-
eral."
Tackett called for the veterans or-
ganizations "to bring back the
(veterans') benefits that they've
squandered."
Tackett also said that he wishes
to show the world that, "We're not
the warmongers that we've estab-
lished ourselves to be."
When he reaches each state capi-
tal, Tackett said he will lobby for
what has become his life's goal: a
national holiday honoring veterans
of the Vietnam War.
Tackett, who served in Vietnam
from 1967 to 1969, has already suc-
ceeded in persuading two states,
Michigan and Maine, to declare May
7 as the "Vietnam Veterans Memo-
rial Holiday - A Day of Peace."
Tackett's dream is for the holiday
to be observed annually. The date
May 7 was chosen because on that

>roblems
day in 1975, President Gerald Ford
declared that "America is no longer
at war," and the Vietnam era came to
an end.
Last month, Tackett was in Ohio
pushing for the holiday. He met
with several state senators, an aide to
the governor, and student leaders at
Ohio State University. He is now
waiting for a response, and is hope-
ful that Ohio will follow the lead of
Michigan, its neighbor to the north.
Tackett vowed to complete his
journey, despite the many hardships
he will encounter along the way.
"I'll stay wherever I possibly can...
I'll eat out of garbage cans if I have
to," he said.
Tackett knows that the odds are
against his succeeding in the mis-
sion. In a press release issued earlier
this week, Tackett wrote, "I trust the
Lord will protect me, but should I
forfeit my life in this worthy cause I
want at least that the American Peo-
ple know that I tried."
Tackett is willing to face the ad-
versities of such an arduous journey
because, "I want to leave a little bit
better world than which I found."

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