100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1989 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS

The Michigan Doily

Thursday, April 6, 1989

Page~

Toups:x
0x
Cliched,
te
stilli fun ':
BY NABEEL ZUBERI
LAST week, my Baby drove up in
a brand new Cadillac. Wayne Toups'
band were blasting on the radio. She
said, "Hey good lookin', I'll racea
you to the Levee and back." So I got
in my Chevy and we raced over ,.
there. She was fast, she was sleek
and she was smooth; my Baby was
pretty good too. We were really red
hot rockin'.
Wayne Toups and Zydecajun are
the frenzied history of southern ock
'n' roll condensed into a five-piece Rh
powerhouse of Dionysian delight.'
Their current album Born on The
Bayou is a whole mess of blues,
soul and New Orleans rolling r
rhythms. These Louisiana gentlemen,
nudge Muddy Waters against D.L.
Menard, and slide Aaron Neville be-
side Van Morrison. Stax, Goldband,
Ace, and Swallow would be the
record labels in their collections.
Hearing them for the first timeWayne Toups and Zydecajun may represent more musical cliches than
you'd expect to find them at theyou can shake an accordian at, but they still promise an entertaining
Apollo Theater in Harlem or somelive show.
southern jukejoint, but, no, you're
more likely to see Toups & Co. at So, Wayne Toups and Zydecajun a decent myth, and clich6s can be a
Dingwalls in London, or in front of embody every American r'n'r clich6 lot of fun sometimes.
5,000 people in Managua. Toups is in the book and almost every ele- WAYNE TOUPS AND ZYDECAJ-
probably more popular in interna- ment of the American musical UN play at the Blind Pig tonight at
tional quarters than in America. myth. So what; we're all suckers for 10 p.m. Tickets are $7.50.

Harold explores racism

BY CHERIE CURRY
TONIGHT - feel the tension that tears at a South
African household in - Master Harold... And The
Boys.
Tonight - witness a powerful examination of
racism and its human effects in -Master Harold...
And The Boys.
Tonght - relive the experiences of the characters
in South African author Athol Fugard's classic -
Master Harold... And The Boys.
"A searing exploration of racism which has no na-
tional boundries," is how Director Richard Klautsch
described the play. "In a cruel and yet all too familiar
way, racism is revealed as the inevitable product of any
society in which the seeds of ignorance and intolerance
are sown by progressive generations. However, Fu-
gard's masterful work portrays the individual strength
and dignity necessary to overcome the influence of the
past."
Master Harold... and the Boys centers on a white
South African teenager named Hally and Willy and
Sam, the two Black servants in his mother's tea room.
One quiet, rainy afternoon, their long-established

relationship is ripped apart when Hally vents the hatred
and humiliation he feels toward his own family on the
two men whose friendship has nurtured him through,
his youth.
Klautsch, who has also directed University produc-
tions The Contrast and Talk Radio, will be one of
several who will take you back to this 1950 Port.
Elizabeth setting. The others include: Charles Jackson,
head of the University's Black Theatre Studies Pro-.,
gram who played Malcolm X in last semester's The
Meeting, as Sam; Scott Weissman, creator and director;
of two experimental theater troupes - "Talk to Us"'M
and the "Residence Hall Repertory Theatre", as Hally;
and Kabin Thomas, who performed this past season in,
A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Trojan Women,,
as Willy.
The Hill Street Players' production of MASTER
HAROLD... AND THE BOYS, sponsored by the
B'nai B'rith Foundation and the University's Housing
Division, will be performed tonight at 8 p.m., Satur-
day at 10 p.m., and Sunday at 2 & 8 p.m. All perfor-
mances take place in the Irwin Green Auditorium of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street.
Tickets are $6, $5 for students and seniors, and may be.
purchased in advance or at the door.

__;
-$-

$5 Revue resurrects

BY AMI MEHTA
FIRST it was the $3 Revue in 1981
followed by the $4 Revue in 1982,
and - you guessed it - the $5 Re-
vue (talk about inflation!) to the
University to entertain audiences
with an evening of vaudevillian-style
songs and skits directed by Joan
Morris, a celebrated and reknowned
vocalist.
This show will be presented
through the University School of
Music in collaboration with the De-
partment of Theater and Drama, and
all of the proceeds will benefit the
Bolcom-Morris Musical Theater
Fund. This scholarship was initiated
in 1987 to help University musical
theater school students. It was named
after Morris and her 1988 Pulitzer

A CLASS ACT
I N L I N E FOR ' 8 9
The calling continues....
P dge your support when called.
e egT e
Senior Pledge Program *The University of Michigan

Prize-winning husband, William
Bolcom, with whom she has recorded
15 albums containing over 200 pop-
ular American songs and has toured
the U.S. and Europe.
The skits, all written by Morris,
are very light and humorous, even
including some slapstick. Morris
feels the skits are the main attraction,
and calls the entire show "a cross be-
tween cabaret and review. It is the
same format as early minstrel-style
where all of the performers are on
stage at all times."
According to senior Michelle
Trame, who has worked with Morris
and is stage managing one of the six
performances, "this show is neat in a
way because it is going back to a
vaudeville review-type style and most
people haven't really seen this. To-
day, they are usually used to seeing
big Broadway musicals."
The students in the show, five of
whom are musical theater majors and
one who is a theater major, will per-
form music from a diverse range of
songwriters, accompanied by pianist
David Kirshenbaum. The program

vaudeville6"
includes classical pieces from Gers4
win to older tunes like "Hey, Good
Lookin"' by Hank Williams.
Trame is "very impressed with the
endurance of the cast members who
have had to withstand four to five
hours of rehearsal for Dragons and
then another three to four hours for
the $5 Revue." She hopes to have a
good turnout as does Morris with (
small but intimate crowd for the $1
Revue, a show that is worth much
more than the $5tpaid for it.r y
THlE $5 REVUE will be performed
tonight, Friday, and Saturday at 1
p.m. and will continue at the same
time April 13-15 in the Arena Studio
in the Frieze Building. Tickets arp
$5.
Michigan Daily
ARTS
763-0379

WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

Y, -

r.,_

Your Summer Job
mor thn jst employment.. ce
savaFamilyCam
a l 1 ta ir
ace St.t *
IIKTERVMEW DATES*
Thursday, March 30'
Last Date: April 12 Sign up at C P & P

THE PROCRAM IN FILM do VIDBO) STUDIES M'ESENTS
S uFriedrich
A New York City based experimental filmmaker who will be present as
part of the Yon Barna Memorial Symposium on Avant-Garde Cinema for
the screening of two of her most recent and widely acclaimed films
"Ties That Bind" (1984)
"Damned If You Don't" (1987)
"Su Friedrich is among a handful of female filmmakers who...sought to invest the
strategies of avuni-garde film-s pecifically the subjective, metaphorical cinema
pioneered by Maya Deren-with feminist concerns."
Lucinda Furlong
The New American Filmmakers Series
Thursday, April 6th
7:30 p.m.
Lorch Hall Auditorium
Admission is Free

Film Series: Hitler and the
H olocaust
Some Had the Courage to Care
Thursday, April67;30pm
NIGHT AND FOG (NACHT UND NEBEL)
...surely the only movie to present the nightmare universe of the concentration
camps without numbing its audience to horror...
THE LEGACY OF ANNE FRANK
A biography of Anne Frank as a symbol of all Jews who suffered the Nazi
persecution. Uses newsreel, photographs, interviews, and quotations from her
diary.
COURAGE TO CARE
Relates the stories of several non-Jews who helped during the Holocaust.
Prompts the audience to ask: -Would I have helped?
Friday April_L.-.7j3Opm
STUDENTS AGAINST NAZIS (A Feature Film)
Members: "Die Weisse Rose" - Summer 1942
Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl. Christoph Probst

Tama ack sthe Jewish Resdene. Camp Agency sponsored by the Fresh Air
*Society of Metropolitan Det*o*t since 903

,a

IGOLD RING SALE,

UAC/SOUNDSTAGE PRESENTS
'Y J
KO SX
-taOdd "X

A,' t

rws...
s. .,.rR
-rr.

Jii*
RX urw, t,6trk sw.«er
G wu Mt
r
tart 7vt WlK'+hC

s

j- Sentenced to death and executed: February 22, 1943

zs r

.i
flwPw

? I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan