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January 13, 1989 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-01-13

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 13, 1989 - Page 11

Women's
track team
.ropens year
BY MARK KATZ
On the heels of a very successful cross-country
season, the women's track team opens up its 1989
,indoor track season Saturday in a 12-team meet at the
4Track and Tennis Building.
"This year we will really be able to put quality
people in every event," women's track coach James
Henry said. "The big word for this team is healthy. If
we're healthy, we will do well. If we can stay healthy,
I think we're going to be not just a competitive team,
but one that will be in contention for the (Big Ten)
Championship."
The indoor track team returns all but one of its
scorers from a team that placed sixth in the Big Ten
Indoor Track Championship last year. The addition of
transfers Carol Boyd and Amy Bannister from
Northwestern and what Henry considers "one of the top
Fecruiing classes in the past five years" should help
(he team exceed last year's performance.
Boyd helped propel the cross-country team to a
seventh-place finish in this year's NCAA national
championship. She rounds off a strong group of
distance runners along with junior Mindy Rowand and
senior Traci Babcock. Bannister specializes in the 600-
and 800-meter runs.
. First-year students Kim Haluscak, a middle-distance
,unner and cross-country standout, and Alison Smith, a
;high jumper, highlight the group of talented recruits.
The veterans of the team include1988 Big Ten
shotput champion Sonya Payne, a junior who placed
second in last year's indoor NCAA championship and
1earned All-American status both indoors and outdoors
last year, and Rowand, Michigan's top cross-country
.runner.
They are supported by junior sprinter Gillian
Osborne, whom Henry calls "the most versatile athlete
on the team,"and senior Dana Davidson, another all-
,around athlete who leads Michigan in the pentathlon
wnd heptathlon.
"I will be surprised if we don't win every single
event at the meet," Henry said.
'M' men run 'tune-up'
KBY JOSH MITNICK
The men's track team will be running sort of a
warm-up lap today when it travels to Eastern Michigan
,;Jniversity to start its indoor season. Eastern
Michigan, Michigan State, Toledo, and Hillsdale will
also be competing.
Because the meet will only be scored according to
individual rather than team performance, Michigan will
not take its full squad to the opening meet in
, psilanti.
Michigan coach Jack Harvey said that the meet
would be a "tune-up" for some of the squad in
preparation for the Wolverines' first big indoor meet,
the Michigan Relays, on Jan. 20.
"This is sort of a low-key meet for us," assistant
coach Ron Warhurst said. "Our goal is just to get our
:feet wet. We don't really know what to expect."
Warhurst added that after the meet at Eastern, the
;Wolverines will have a better idea of how to prepare
for next week.
Michigan's top two long-distance runners, junior
Brad Barquist and senior John Scherer, will be staying
home from today's opening contest to rest up for the
upcoming Relays. Scherer is the returning NCAA
10,000-mieters champion.
, But pole vaulters Dave Irvine and Brad Darr will
participate in today's warmup. Senior quarter-miler
Claude Tiller will also be part of the Michigan squad.
"We're not going to be as sharp coming back from
* the vacation. We're just trying to get a meet under our
!belt," Harvey said.
The Wolverines placed fifth overall in the final Big
-Ten standings last year. Harvey said he expects the
squad to be in a similar position this year. "The
overall team strength is not enough to be a contender.
In some events we're just not competitive."

NCAA alters Prop. 48,
sets up athletes' group

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A new group
will soon join NCAA schools in the debate
concerning what's best for college athletes.
The new group is made up of college athletes.
Legislation setting up a 16-member
student committee drew far less attention than
other actions of the 83rd annual NCAA
convention, which ended Wednesday. But
Executive Director Dick Schultz believes it
could be one of the most significant actions
the ruling body of college sports has taken.
"I think this is a giant step forward,"
Schultz said. "It's going to be very important
now to establish a structure where we can
pick very interested student-athletes who will
take the responsibility seriously and do their
homework."
The more than 1,800 delegates gave
unanimous approval to the resolution. The
students won't be able to write or introduce
legislation to NCAA conventions, but for the
first time in the organization's long and
sometimes checkered history, the voice of the
students is going to be heard.
WHILE NCAA STUDENTS secured
a victory in one round, many might say they
suffered a serious reversal with the
elimination of the "partial qualifier" as spelled
out in Proposition 48. By a 163-154 vote on
Wednesday, Division I schools reversed their
decision on Tuesday and closed the only
loophole available to high school prospects
who do not meet all the freshman-eligibilility
standards of Proposition 48.
A partial qualifier is a high school graduate
with a 2.0 overall grade-point average who
does not meet other Proposition 48
requirements such as minimum test-scores or

a 2.0 average in college preparatory courses.
Since Proposition 48 went into effect three
years ago, an estimated 1,800 athletes have
received scholarship under the partial qualifier
provision. Beginning in 1990, there will be
no partial qualifiers, and high school
prospects will have to meet all eligibility
requirements.
Previously, partial qualifiers could receive
full scholarship aid but had to sit out their
freshman year and then have only three years
of eligibility left.
"I have to admit I was a little surprised
that it passed," Schultz said, noting that
several other measures aimed at altering
Proposition 48 were defeated. "What they
were really doing was strengthening Prop
48."
Now, partial qualifiers will face the same
dilemma as non-qualifiers - having to pay
their own expenses in their freshman year
while not playing or practicing in their sport.
They may receive scholarships as sophomores
if they complete 24 credit hours, but will
have only three years of eligibility.
AN NCAA spokesperson in Mission,
Kan., said about 600 partial qualifiers had
been admitted each of the three years
Proposition 48 has been in effect.
"This will affect not just Black kids, but
poor kids who are Black, white and other
shades," said Jim Frank, commissioner of the
Southwestern Athletic Conference.
Black educators have generally opposed
Proposition 48 on the basis that the college
entrance exams are discriminatory against
minority and economically disadvantaged
students.

JOHN MUNSON Daily
Michigan guard Leah Wooldridge, here against Toledo, has
been starting for Tempie Brown, who was benched.
Wake up, Bud;
here's OSU, IU

BY ADAM BENSON
Click your heels together, Bud
VanDeWege, your team needs to get
home.
If you told the Michigan
women's basketball coach that his
team would have a .500 record after
12 games, he might have been so
stunned that he'd hit his head on the
Crisler Arena court.
If you told VanDeWege that top
scorers and potential all-Big Ten
players Lorea Feldman and Tempie
Brown would not be starting, he
may have said, "You're dreaming".
WAKE UP, BUD, it's really
happening.
Your Wolverines were trounced
by Iowa and upset by Minnesota.
Brown has been benched for poor
play, and Feldman is academically
ineligible.
Now, after a month on the road,
Michigan returns to Crisler Arena
for a weekend series with Ohio State
and Indiana
Friday night's matchup between
the Wolverines and the Buckeyes
will match two early-season
disappointments. But while
Michigan's troubles center around a
mediocre record, Ohio State is
panicking over its absence from the
top 20.
THE BUCKEYES, always one
of the Big Ten's powers, slumped
early this season, but are 7-0 since
the return of preseason All-Big Ten
center Nikita Lowry. Point guard
Lisa Cline, whb is averaging 22.4
points per game, and Lowry (16.1)
provide the Buckeyes with one of the
best scoring tandems in the country.
Some basketball pundits would
call Friday's game a mismatch, but
Ohio State coach Nancy Darsch feel
that the talent level of the these
teams makes no difference when the
Buckeyes come to Ann Arbor.
"Anytime you put Ohio State and
Michigan together, emotion carries

over from the football rivalry,"
Darsch said.
While some coaches look to just
be competitive against a team as
strong as Ohio State, VanDeWege
wants an upset.
"Ohio State is beatable; they are
not the same invincible outfit they
have been over the past six years,"
VanDeWege said. "If we play a good
game, there's no reason they can't be
beat,"
Sunday's opponents from Indiana,
surpassing most early-season
predictions, have a 9-3 record and are
2-0 in the Big Ten. Center Pam
Fritz tops the team in scoring (14.7
ppg) and rebounding (7 rpg). Arane
Mooney, the Big Ten's Player of the
Week after scoring 27 points in
Indiana's win over Northwestern,
provides the heart and soul of the
Hoosiers as their senior leader and
point guard.
Even with the strong
performances of his stars, Indiana
coach Jim Izard downplays his
team's capabilities. "(Fritz and
Mooney) are only two-fifths of the
team," Izard said. "We're really not
that good."
Izard sees the game much
differently than VanDeWege, who
expects the Indiana-Michigan
matchup to be one of the most
rugged duels of the Big Ten season.
"They use a small lineup, but they
are one of the most aggressive teams
in the Big Ten. What makes them
tough is how they attack on defense
and their up-tempo offense. These
teams match up very well. It will be
a tremendous ball game."
The Wolverines want to win
these two games to improve their
record and to save face. "(Last
weekend) hurt their pride,"
VanDeWege said about his team.
"They are a better team then it
appears. Coming home and getting
another chance to prove it will
provide us with added motivation."

Bo and Al Associated Press
Hall of Famer Al Kaline jokes with Michigan football coach Bo
Schembechler during the Detroit Tigers' annual winter party Thursday
night at the Detroit Athletic Club. Schembechler was named to the Tigers"
board of directors Thursday.

'M' to build fencing tradition ?
$ OY JEFF SHERAN schools do not have women's teams.
a For the first time in more than 10 The teams, consisting of 13 fencers
ears, Ann Arbor will host an each, will compete in a series of
tercollegiate fencing tournament. five-touch bouts.
Saturday's 9 a.m. meet at the Though not as popular as other
Coliseum will feature competition sports, fencing does boast a
etween six Michigan universities in following of approximately 50
[our events. active members. Club president
Participating in the tournament Rajesh Kothari said, "It may not be
besides Michigan are Michigan State as big here as it is in Europe, but
4nd the University of Detroit, both it's still a great sport to play and
varsity squads, as well as Eastern watch."
Michigan, Oakland University, and For those interested in
UM-Dearborn. fencing, Kothari urges becoming
In the men's competition, there involved in the club, which is
will be duels with foil, ep6e, and comprised of students, faculty, and
kabre, but only foil will be used in staff. Practices are Monday and
be women's category, since certain Wednesday at 7 p.m.
-I
Ii O EIJJ/ [kI1TZTM,
at the Heidelberg 215 N. Main, Ann Arbor
Reservations Showtimes
995-8888 r Fri. 8:30 & 11 pm *
Admission $6 Sat. 8:30 & 11 pm *
Improvisational Comedy Nightclub !

r NEMA DIRECTORyY'

University of Michigan Library
Bentley Historical Library
School of Information and Library Studies present

Gwendolyn
Brooks
Poet Laureate of Illinois
Pulitzer Prize Winner
2:00 pm
Monday, January 16, 1989
- Michigan Union Ballroom

Diversity Day Symposium
Blacks in the Arts-

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