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April 04, 1989 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-04-04

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Crime on Campus

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 4, 1989-- Page 5
Turkish students begin
cultural week celebrations

Northwood
Northwood IV
II
Northwood
NLRB,.;
HUBBARD
HAYWARD
Building Q
_ I
BONISTEEL
FULLER R

Assault: A violent attack, eitherverbal or physical.
Larceny: Unlawfully taking another's property
without consent.
Motor vehicle theft: Any unlawful entry into a car
with the intent to operate the car without the driver's
approval.
Burglary: The act of breaking into any structure to
commit theft, some other felony or a misdemeanor.
Sex offenses: As incidents such as indecent
exposure, gross indecency.
Arson: The crime of intentionally setting fire to a
building or property.

* Assault (4)
f Breaking & entering (24)
larceny (73)
* Motor vehicle theft (1)
A Sex offense (4)
X Burglary (19)
Arson (3)

This crime map is based on
statistics for the month of
February provided by the
University Public Safety
Department and the Ann
Arbor Police.
- Monica Smith

BY VERA SONGWE
The film Iron Earth, Copper Sky
which opened for the first time in
the U.S at the Michigan Theater
yesterday, marked the beginning of
Turkish Month.
The film, co-sponsored by the
University of Michigan Turkish
Students Association, is about the
creation of myths, in this case as a
product of fear.
Engineering doctoral student Ba-
hadir Inozu, president of the
UMTSA, said, "We thought that the
Turkish culture was largely ignored,
so we decided to introduce it."
Singer Zulfu Livaneli, who di-
rected the film, will speak on his
film and how myths are formed to-
morrow at the Michigan Union's
Ballroom. Livaneli, who was twice
the guest of U.S.S.R. President

Mikhail Gorbachev, has produced
three other films and and is the lead-
ing musician in Turkey.
Engineering Prof. Ziya Akcasu
said, "(Livaneli) charms all of us. He
has the ability to keep us spell-
bound."
UMTSA members could not af-
ford to bring Livaneli to the Univer-
sity, so the event is jointly spon-
sored by the Universities of Michi-
gan, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana,
Ohio.
University Residential College
Prof. Hugh Cohen and Department
of Near Eastern Studies Prof. James
Stewart-Robinson will also speak on
the panel tomorrow.
On Sunday night, about 200
people gathered at the Union's
Kuenzel Room to listen to Livaneli
play some of his popular hits.

Other events will be taking place
at the University to celebrate Turk-
ish month. On Wednesday, there
will be a discussion on Turkish po-
etry through the ages given by the
founder of the Turkish Ministry of
Culture Prof. Talat Halman and oth-
ers.
"A professor at the University
once said that the Turks did not write
poetry," Bahadir said. "We thought
the only way to prove the contrary
was to bring professors who knew
more about Turkish culture to the
University."
The Turkish cultural series also
features a discussion on Anatolian
Mysticism. "Documentaries would
be shown and students would be
given the chance to have a better in-
sight into Turkish culture," said en-
gineering graduate student Tayfan
Akin.

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Haitian government checks
"bloodless" coup attempt

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) - The govern-
ment said it foiled an attempt Sunday by rebel army
officers to overthrow Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril. U.S. of-
ficials said loyal soldiers apparently rescued Avril as he
was being driven away to be deported.
A government communique read over state-run
television said "certain officers besieged" the presi-
dential palace" and attempted to overthrow the govern-
ment."
Earlier, sources in Haiti said four military officers
had ousted Avril, who seized power six months ago in
the second coup in this Caribbean country in less than
a year.
The communique did not explain how the the plot
was suppressed but said "Lt. Gen. Prosper Avril is in
control of the situation and guarantees peace in the
streets and the security of life and property."
U.S. Embassy spokesperson Susan Clyde said re-

ports indicated the coup attempt occurred about 4 or 5
a.m. and that Avril was detained for a time.
"Our last report is that he is at the palace and is in
charge again," she said, adding that the attempted coup
was "totally bloodless."
Later, Radio Liberte quoted an unidentified soldier
as saying Port-au-Prince would be "set on fire" unless
the government released one of the alleged coup lead-
ers, identified by the soldier as Lt. Col. Himmler
Rebu, commander of the Leopards battalion commando
unit. Military sources said Rebu was under military
guard at the National Palace.
Initial reports had said the army commander, Maj.
Gen. Herard Abraham, was among the coup leaders.
But later accounts said that was not correct and that the
plot collapsed when Abraham refused the rebels' offer
of the presidency.

Externships provide students
with practical job experience

Mich. fights
LANSING (AP) - In the first
computerized assault on drug profits
in Michigan, state agents have
slapped a $400,000 bill for back
taxes on suspected drug dealers,
officals said yesterday.
State and local officials held a
news conference to publicize the first
operation of the Drug Asset Recov-
ery Team, which used labtop com-
puters to assess the tax bill follow-
ing Friday drug busts in Livingston
County.
"They can't get back in business
without any assets," said state Trea-

surer Robert Bowman.
Though the program to use small
computers to instantly assess drug
dealers for unpaid taxes was unveiled
in February, officials boasted about
its first successful use.
In the raid, state Treasurer De-
partment auditors with computers
joined Livonia police to attack an
alleged multi-million dollar drug'
operation. Officers seized drugs and
$188,500 in cash, and called DART
agents.
Information gathered at a Liv-
ingston County house led to the

BY DIANE COOK
Thoughts of graduating and find-
ing a job stir most students' fears.
But some University students have
created a settling solution for this
problem -- "externship" programs.
Like internships, the Student
Alumni Council's externships hook
up students with University alumni
in many fields. For one week, stu-
dents have the opportunity to learn
about the job by shadowing a rou-
tine schedule.
In addition, students can make
} contacts for future employment after

drug dealers with taxes

graduation, said SAC President San-
gita Rao, an LSA junior.
SAC has offered externships for
its members since 1983, and is now
extending the opportunity to all
University students, Rao said.
"The purpose of the organization
is to provide a liaison for future,
past, and present students," said Rao.
Students must be responsible for
travel expenses and housing accom-
modations, and the position is with-
out pay. Experience is the most at-
tractive compensation of the extern-
ship, said Rao.

Available positions include
working with a TV news reporter in
Cincinnati, a professor of pharma-
cology at a medical school in Vir-
ginia, a staff assistant to Senator
Wolpe in Washington D.C., and a
reporter for Voice of America,
among many others.
Placement generally requires a
two-month notice. Though the
majority of externships won't be
available until the fall, some jobs
are still available for this May.

seizure of 1,050 pounds of marijuana
at another home.
The drug operation sold an esti-
mated $3.3 million in drugs a year,
according to investigators. Livonia
police arrested nine people and seized
three cars and two pickup trucks in
the raids.
"Our Drug Asset Recovery Team
is designed to take the profit out of
illegal drug trafficking," said Gov.
James Blanchard. "We intend to seize
the assets of drug dealers, the biggest
tax cheats of all."
Officials said DART agents filed
treasury tax levies with the Wayne
County Register of Deeds office as-
sessing two suspects fo $399,859 in
back taxes, penalties, and interest.
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