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March 24, 1989 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-24

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 24, 1989 - Page 3

Speaker
reveals
unknown
artists
ay Ann Maurer and
lMatthew Shankin
The words "women" and
'sauppression" have been synony-
mous throughout history in the field
of art.
'Only in the last decade have
*omen artists gained acceptance and
world-wide recognition. But for
Scandinavian women artists, the
repognition is slow coming.
Last night, Danish writer Grethe
iolmen spoke on the unrecognized
accomplishments of Scandinavian
women artists and brought her lec-
ture to life with a slide presentation
of 50 virtually unknown, but highly
regarded, works of art.
Holmen told about 75 people at
the Modern Languages Building that
the main objective of her midwest
topr is to bring much deserved
recognition to these hidden artists.
Holmen feels their lack of expo-
sure is due to Scandinavia's cultural
isolation from the western world.
"Scandinavia is a region tucked
away from the western influence, and
our artists have not been well repre-
spnted in Europe and the United
States," she said. "On the whole, our
artists have remained our artists."
Holmen spoke on 19th century
artists from Norway, Sweden, Fin-
land, and Denmark, giving a brief
account of the hardships they en-
dured. These hardships included harsh
criticism by art critics and a society
Which believed a woman's place was
in the home, she said.
"These women had a double
handicap," Holmen said. "Not only
were they women, but women in a
male-dominated art world."
For example, Holmen said
women paid double in tuition for the
same education men received. Also,
class sizes increased - for women
only - resulting in less personal-
ized instruction.
In response, women opened their
own schools but were still subjected
to the whims of the male academia,
IDolmen said.
"Women were allowed to paint
male nudes, but only if the subject
'wore a heavy loincloth," Holmen
said.
. "The works by Scandinavian
women artists are few and far be-
tween in the museums, I hope this
changes soon" said Holmen.

CCF

supporters appeal

group's status to regents

BY ALEX GORDON
Supporters of the local Cornerstone Christian Fel-
lowship packed the public comments session of the
University's Board of Regents meeting yesterday to
protest CCF's recent derecognition by the Central
Student Judiciary.
Four students and one University professor ad-
dressed the regents, arguing that CSJ's actions against
CCF were a violation of freedom of speech and reli-
gion.
Last month, CCF was officially derecognized by
the judiciary branch of the Michigan Student Assem-
bly because of the group's policy against allowing gay
males and lesbians to reach leadership positions.
CCF's supporters all requested that the regents re-
view the ruling themselves. Bryan Mistele, an MSA
representative and member of the Inter-Varsity Chris-
tian Fellowship, asked the regents "to ensure that your
own policy of freedom of expression for closely held
religious beliefs be enforced."
MSA President-elect Aaron Williams confirmed
yesterday that he wants the case retried. He said that
the MSA constitution should include a provision
about religious freedom. "I don't believe in derecogni-
tion in general for any groups," Williams said.
Four of the CSJ's 10 judicial spots are currently
unoccupied. A four-member panel of two judiciary and
two MSA members appoints the judges. Current as-
sembly president Mike Phillips said he would try to
fill the spots during the next 11 days, so Williams'
assembly will not be able to influence the appoint-
ments.
Phillips added that he agrees with the CSJ's ac-
tions, but acknowledged that "gray areas exist when
you have the Bill of Rights bumping heads (between
freedoms of speech and religion)."

Spokespeople for the Lesbian and Gay Rights Or-
ganizing Committee (LaGROC) yesterday called the
protest "outrageous" and said the arguments were
"flawed."
Eric Herrenkohl, spokesperson for the Michigan
Christian Fellowship, clarified to the regents CCF's
religious justification for "being unaccepting of
homosexual behavior within (their) group of leader-
ship."
"Intervarsity holds to the Biblical teaching that
same-gender sexual relationships are rebellion against
our Maker, and therefore destructive of our human-
ness," Herrenkohl said.
Philosophy Prof. George Mavrodes said it was ab-
surd for any group to "accept into their leadership peo-
ple who flatly reject" the group's principles.
What actions the regents might take, if any, have
not been determined yet. Regent Paul Brown (D-
Petoskey) said "regents don't like to get involved in
student affairs."
Groups derecognized by MSA are prohibited from
meeting in University facilities, obtaining funds from
the assembly, and from using amplification equipment
for Diag speeches.
However, LaGROC spokesperson Brian Durrance
noted that according to an ad in the Daily, CCF still.
meets in Mason Hall. "It's not like they're off cam-
pus," Durrance said. "There's a big difference between
derecognition and censorship."
During the regents' meeting yesterday, Vice Presi-
dent of Student Services Henry Johnson said he had
advised an attorney for the CCF that the group may be
able to file a complaint under the University's anti-
discrimination Policy, but he added that CCF has not
done so.

JULIE HOLLMAN/Daily
A student from Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament holds an
umbrella with holes that amount to five percent of the umbrella's
surface area cut out. This, according, to WAND, represents the 5
percent ineffectiveness of SDI.
WAND protests

SDI

as ineffective

BY TONY SILBER
Bearing umbrellas riddled with holes, members of the Women's Action
for Nuclear Disarmament (WAND) protested the sixth anniversary of former
President Ronald Reagan's "Star Wars" proposal yesterday in the fishbowl.
The protesters said the umbrellas symbolized the holes in Reagan's 1983
Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) plan for a satellite defense shield to protect
the U.S. from nuclear attack.
The system will not work and cannot protect all the people, WAND
members said. "Even the experts claim that only 95 percent of the missiles
would be destroyed at best, but that's not enough. It could still cause a nu-
clear winter," said Robin Guenzel, a Residential College senior and member
of WAND. "The billions of dollars they are spending (on Star Wars) could
be better spent on the homeless."
Tobi Hanna-Davies, Washtenaw County WAND co-president, said SDI
will also lead to unlimited escalation of the arms race.
"Star Wars escalates a space race and it will force the Soviets to keep up
with us," she said. "We will continue to see newer and nastier weapons as a
result of this."
However, LSA junior Steve Carey, after receiving a flier from the
WAND members, said he disagreed with the group's assertions.
"I think it is a great thing that the United States is spending billions of
dollars on a tool of defense rather than offense," he said. "I'd like to see
nuclear weapons abolished, but only if it were a mutual bilateral cut with
the Soviets."
Hanna-Davies agreed, but said the Star Wars project contradicts the idea
of arms control and reductions.
"The arms race will only continue to spiral upwards as long as we keep
spending so much money on a system that won't protect the people," she
said. "Star Wars protects our missile sites, not our population."

Speakers: Iran economy still
suffers from 1979 revolution

BY DIMA ZALATIMO
Iran's economy is in a "paralyzed
state," an Iranian-born visiting
scholar told a 50-member audience
last night at Rackham Amphitheater.
Dr. Sohrab Behdad, who is re-
searching the political economy of
the Iranian Revolution at the Uni-
versity, said the situation can only
be contained when a new regime es-
tablished a new economic order.
To solve the "prolonged revolu-
tionary economic crisis in Iran," Be-
hdad said Iran would have to borrow
about $15 million from countries
who presently place Iran in "the sa-
tanic category."
Behdad was the first of three
speakers during a critical discussion
of trends in post-revolutionary Iran,
sponsored by the Center for Near
Eastern and North African Studies.
The discussion, a continuation of

the Center's annual Briefing Series,
was titled, "Iran - Ten Years After
The Revolution." It focused on
Iran's economy, culture, and rela-
tions with superpowers and other
countries.
Iranian-born Dr. Mohammad
Ghanoonparvar, a Rockefeller Re-
search Fellow at the University, said
the seemingly secular Iranian state
became a religious one, and its
monarchical dictatorship became a
religious autocracy after the revolu-
tion 10 years ago.
Censorship of art has been a
measure used by both governments
used to silence voices of opposition,
Ghanoonparvar said.
"After the revolution, social ac-
tivities were limited to demonstra-
tions and prayer meetings,"
Ghanoonparvar said.
Dr. James Bill, a professor of

government at the College of
William and Mary, then told the au-
dience that Americans misunderstand
Iranians by unjustly connecting
them with terrorism, hostages, tur-
bans, and million-dollar death war-
rants.
Despite Iran's negative image,
Bill said that in the long run, both
Iran and the U.S. would need each
other for geographically strategic
reasons.
Bill also presented a slide show
which he put together after his trip
to Iran this past summer. "This is a
country hurting, bleeding," he said,
showing images of dead and injured
civilians and soldiers.
In panel discussion that followed,
all three panelists agreed that the
revolution affected both positive and
negative change.
"It was a revolution to bring Iran
back home away from the West,"
said Bill.
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

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353-8999
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ARABIC CULTURAL NIGHT
celeb-rating Palestinian Land Day

ATTENTION!
Michigan Daily subscribers
and university departments:
Spring/Summer subscriptions start May 5th to August 11th.
One issue per week on Friday for twelve total issues:
May 5, 12, 19
June 2, 9, 16
July 7, 14,21, 28
August 4, 11
Prepaid subscriptions: Out of town......$8.00
* Intown..........$6.00

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"DETROIT FOLKLORE TROUP"
A Talk Honoring the 13th Anniversary of
Palestinian Land Day;
" Arabic Calligraphy Exhibit;
" Art and Handicrafts Exhibit;
" Traditional Dresses (wear your own!)
" Arabic Food and Much More!

University purchase order numbers accpeted.
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Free! " EAST QUAD CAFETERIA * Free!

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Sponsored by: The General Union of Palestinian Students of Ypsilanti/Ann Arbor, American-Arab Anti-
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Government, Office of Minority Affairs, Michigan Student Assembly, LSA-SG.

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Good Friday
Liturgy
5:30 pm
The Great Vigil
and
First Eucharist
of Easter
11:00 p.m., Sat.
Easter Day
Service
5:00 p.m.
Dinner 6:00 p.m.

Canterbury
House
218 N. Division St.
(At Catherine)
665-0606

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(1"i 1

818 S. STATE, ANN ARBOR
OPEN 'TIL MIDNIGHT, SUN-THURS
2 AM, FRI & SAT

Resume
Service
For high quality resumes,
matching cover sheets and
envelopes, depend on Kinko's,
the copy center.
rn-u-._ _-

Religious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
AMERICAN BAlTIST CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
across from Campus Inn
Sunday, 9:55 a.m.: Worship Service
11:15 a.m. Church School classes, all ages
Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.: free supper,
fellowship, and Bible Study.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(south of CCRB just off Washtenaw)
Revand Don Postema
Sunday at 10 a.m.: Sermon:
"Journey from the Desert to Jerusalem"
at 5:55 p.m: A meditative service of
scripture, prayer, silence, and
singing of Taize music
Everyone welcome!
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Church Chaplaincy)
218 N. Division (at Catherine)
Good Friday Liturgy-5:30 p.m.
"The Great Vigil and First Eucharist of Easter"
11:00 p.m. Saturday
Sunday Schedule
Easter Day Service-5:00 p.m.
Celebrant and Preacher:
The Rev. Dr. Virginia Peacock
Easter Supper-6:00 p.m.
Call 665-0606
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA
801 South Forest at Hill Street
Good Friday Service at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m.

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