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March 23, 1989 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-23

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, a

ARTS
Thursday, March 23, 1989

Page 7

The Michigan Daily

Fo's farce

ROBIN LOZNAK/Daily
Cast members swarm around one another at a dress rehearsal for the MUSKET production of Chicago, a
musical replete with glitter, jazz, and death.
In Chicago, love's murder

We Won'tJ
BY MARC MAIER
W~VHAT do a working-class U
a communist playwright, and M
in common? Well, the uprising
We Won't Pay! We Won't Pay!
nist playwright Dario Fo. Midl
the University Players have per
weekends their production of t
its Ann Arbor premiere at t
tonight.
"A communist play in Midl
Isn't Bush still president?"
Calm down. Here's the deal
satire that takes aim at a myriad
relationships between classes
sexes, to name only a few. Th
working-class woman returnsf
wtih her groceries - after ha"
them. As her husband returns,
hide what she's done. From th
plications ensue. The play's m
story twists wildly about.
Wait a minute! 'Message
Blech. Sounds didactic and preac
Never fear, the play is much
tor Barry Goldman explains: "In
of politics in it, but it's also a
farce. All of these things mak
provocative and untraditional."
"Oh no! Hey, what about M
right?!"
Hold on! Let me finish. Th
certainly untraditional, but no
based on the medieval "giullari
wandering minstrels performed'
ian satire in the streets of Euro
the people, for the people," says
style of Fo's theater has to dow
tions of bourgeois theater, tha
He continues, "The play is made
"Good God,what about Midla
Geez, don't you even want t
to what Goldman described as a'
town?
"Well... yeah, I guess."
Okay. Well, for one thing, T
the Arts invited University Pla
year. They have a brand new th
provided by Dow Chemical, an
in it. The company did four per
two weekends and met with rea
tire spectrum. Goldman was ple

Pay! satirizes class relations
especially because performing a play by a communist
playwright in a theater owned by a giant company, in a
prising in Italy in 1974, town where most people work for the company, was
4idland, Michigan have risky.
in Italy is the basis for "I'll say."
,a play by the commu- Yeah, well it just so happens that the play is
and, Michigan is where uniquely suited to that situation, because Fo and his
formed for the last two troupe created the play to travel around with, and they
hat play, which makes took it to union halls and factories, "Into places where
he Trueblood Theatre working-class people live, because the play deals with
working-class people," said Goldman.
and?! What's going on? And apparently, the show did reach some working-
class people. Goldman relates how line workers who
. The play is a political had just negotiated a new contract two weeks ago, came
of targets including the up to him and said how they wished the play had been
and the battle of the there then. "They really honestly felt that it would have
ie story begins when a brought a different tone to the discussions, and made a
from the grocery store big difference for them. Well, wow!" he beamed.
ving refused to pay for He has good reason to be happy, because the play is
she and a friend try to designed to rouse people to action. It's-
is basic situation, com- "Action!! I knew it! They started a revolution up
iessage emerges as the there, didn't they. Someone oughta call Governor
Blanchard-"
'? 'Political satire'? Stop interrupting. The play simply shows us people
hy." in situations that we can recognize, in positions that
1more than that. Direc- we can recognize. Let Goldman explain: "It's a theater
ndeed, the play has a lot of situation. This is not a theater of psychology, of
satire, a comedy and a what a particular character is going through. It is about
ke for something quite the situation they are in, and what they represent."
What they represent in this case is workers, and the ac-
idland?! Is everyone all tors demonstrate to us the attitudes of workers in gen-
eral. You can probably tell that Fo's theater is related
he style of the play is to the epic theater of Brecht, but probably funnier. But
t unprecendented. It is the aim is the same.
" form of acting, where "Well, just what is that aim? Is it subversive
bawdy, anti-authoritar- political preaching?"
pe. "It was a theater by No, far from it. After seeing the play, Goldman
s Goldman. "The whole said, "It's up to people to then make a decision to
with breaking down no- change their own situation, not wait for it to change
t famous fourth wall." around them. It's about taking a stance. We're just ex-.
e to provoke." posing the situation, getting people to think." Does
nd!!!"" that sound subversive?
o know why they went "Well, no, not really. But-"
"staunchly Republican" Hey, no more questions. If you're interested, go see
it, okay?
"All right. If Midland could handle it, I guess I can,"

BY JILL PISONI
ACTS of murder, greed, corruption,
violence, and exploitation set to mu-
sic and dance - that's what Chicago
is all about. Set in 1920s Chicago,
the musical is the story of Roxie
Hart, a woman who wants to be a
nightclub singer. She kills her un-
faithful lover on Valentine's Day and
then tries to capitalize on the public-
ity of the murder. Nice girl.
The show, full of glitz, glitter,
and steam, is Jazz Age vaudeville at
its peak. There will be plenty of
brilliant displays of color - both in
the costumes and in the characters'
personalities. In the jail and at the
trial, Roxie meets up with a number
of colorful characters. Her cell-mates,
the "Merry Murderesses," are also
guilty of killing their lovers in
crimes of passion (they had it com-
ing, is their claim). Roxie's lawyer,
Billy Flynn, is expensive but knows
the process of the law so well that he
HELP WA E
SELF-MOTIVATED INDIVIDUALS to
work full-time in a fast-paced retail copy
shop. No experience necessary. Great op-
portunity to join a rapidly growing company.
Includes benefits. Apply in person at
Kinko's, 540 E. Liberty.
STUDENT TO DO statistical & curve-fitting
ramming in EXCEL for Macintosh.
tacxt Tim Wade or Mary Rexer at 764-
9922.
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE in Western
Wayne and Downriver areas. Don't wait until
V June--Applppy now. For DOWNRIVER area
Call (3 284-2260 ask for Sharon. For
WESTERN WAYR"E area call (3 13)425-
6226 ask for Michell. Good pay rates. No
fee. l TD TEMPORARY SERVICE.
SUMMER JOB- PART TIME. Car neces-
sary. Responsiblities include driving two
boys 8 and 6 to swim class and tennis 3
momings per week, July and August, maybe
sitting some evenings, salary negotiable. Call
665-369 after7 pm.
THE DEPT. OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS
is luring RENTAL MANAGERS for its Out-
door Program for S ringSummer semester.
Pay is $4.60/hr. CaII the NCRB at 763-4560
for more information, or stop by to pick up au
application.
THE DEPT. OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS
is hiring TRIP LEADERS for its Outdoor
Pr ram for Sp./Su. semester. Experience
leading outdoor trips (backpacking, climbing,
canoefraft basic camping) preferred. Must be
available fr Ap7-9 training weekend. Call
the NCRB at 763-4560 or stop by during
business hours for more information.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY is currently ac-
cepting applications for Assistant Account
Executives in the Classified Department.
Stop by. our office at 420 Maynard to pick up
an application and sign up for an interview,
or call 764-0557 for more infomation.
Deadline for all applications is Friday, March
24, at 5pm.
THE PRINCETON REVIEW
Nation's #1 test prep service seeks directors
for Dtroit/Ann Arbor, San Diego K.C. of-
fices. Must be bright, self-starter able to excel
in entrepreneurial atmosphere. Ability to
manage people. 1 yr. work exp. + high stan-
dardized test scores a plus. Salary competi-
tive. Send resume: TPR 28104 Orchard Lake
Rd. Suite 111, Farmington Hills, MI 48018.
PERFECT FOR STUDENTS!
Part time jobs with MAJOR telemarket-
ing company working evenings. $5-;
$8/hour. Flexible hours. Located' 2
BLOCKS from Student Union.
Call 996-8890. Ask for Mr. Rush
Where The Party Never Ends--
NOW HIRING
* DOORMEN

can get anyone off. And then there is
Roxie's ever-faithful husband, whom
she shuns and ignores.

(Chicago)
vaudevillian
make some

uses the
style to
pretty big

statements... about how
something as immoral
as murder can be turned
into money and fame.
The musical uses the vaudevillian
style to make some pretty big state-
ments about the relationship between
law and justice, about the power of
money to turn people into
commodities, and about how some-
thing as immoral as murder can be
turned into money and fame.
The show is sponsored by MUS-
KET - Michigan Union Show, Co-
eds Too. MUSKET was one of the
first co-ed organizations in the

W 1 1?. MUL r .A K tUrm uan UiUs r
Gyr card trials at the U. of M. Paying $2.00
each used card, $10.00 each complete set of
four different ($5, $10, $20 and $40) used
cards. Undamaged cards, lease! For promp
payment, mail to: Robert boyle, 207 Lite
Neck Road, Clearwater, FL 3615-1339.
WILLOWAY DAY CAMP
is seeking talented, friendly students living in
W. Bimfid. Birm. Farn., and Novi for gen-
eral counseling, W'SI and A & C positions in
a fun summer job. (June 19-Aug. 18). Write:
27580 Harvard, Southfield, MI 48076. Call
356-8123.
HANDS-ON IBM-PC training at Cleary
College. Comprehensive, short-term semi-
nars. IBM-PC utilization- Wed 4/5-4/26. In-
tro. to Lotus 123; Sat. 4/22-4/29. $100 each.
Call 483-4400 ext. 344.
GP
$99 ANYWHERE IN THE USA ON
NORTHWESTsAIRLINES! Bring your
American Express voucher. Call REGENCY
TRAVEL, 665-6122, ask for Ann or Dawn.
EUROPE '89 - London from $379, Amster-
dam from $518, Frankfurt from $448, Paris
from $608. Eurail ass from $320. RE-
GENCY TRAVEL 209 S. State 665-6122.
Ask for Deb or Dan.
MICHIGAN MOVERS- SHIPPING to NY
& NJ! Ask about free summer storage! 668-
0972.
MUST SELL!!! One way train ticket to
Chicago from Ann Arbor. Good thru Sat. ex-
cept Fri. Call Micki at 764-2838.
NEED A RIDE TO NY/NJ? Share expenses
leaving May 1. Call Nanette 769-0197.
ORIENT SUPERFARES SAVE 30%+
Beijing fr. $1149, Seoul fr. $729, Shanghai
fr. $1099, Taipi fr. $751 Tokyo fr. $782.
REGENCY T VEL, 269S. State. Call
665-6122, ask for Joanne or Dan.
RAFT WEST VIRGINIA'S WONDERFUL
NEW RIVER. This spring, take a break in W.
Virginia. River trip, 2 nights camping &
meals included for only $49.95 per person.
Call for details 1-800-USA-RAK.
ROUND TRIP ANYWHERE, US or Mexico
on Contin'o. $300/B.O. Call Dave, 747-8105.
SPRING BREAK! Log cabin retreat. Ful r
equipped, sleeps 2-4 Outdoor hot tub, X
skiing, snowshoe options. $38-58 per night/
mid-week rates cheaper! 10 min. from Tra-
verse City. 616-276-9302.
Student Travel Breaks at Stamos'
Kerry Town * 407 North Fifth
663-4400 483-5040
Traverse City area. LOG CABINS w/ fire-
place. Fully equipped. Sleeps 2-4. Includes
ot tub, boats, canoes, linens. $335-360 a
week. 616-276-9502.
ROOMMATES
1 GREAT HOUSE! 3 Connecting rooms
avail. for 2 or 3 nonsmoking males and or
females. FREE parkin FREE laundry.
Across from B-school. May to May lease.
Call Suzy 665-1339!

Union, performing student produc-
tions as far back as 85 years ago. The
shows are completely student-run,
from production, direction and chore-
ography to lighting and set design.
MUSKET invites everyone to per-
form, but especially encourages non-
theater and non-music majors.
This year MUSKET chose
Chicago because it features a large
cast of women. The organization
feels there have been too few roles
for women in past MUSKET and
other University productions.
The Chicago story began in 1926
as a Broadway melodrama by Maurice
Dallas Watkins. It was turned into A
musical by Bob Fosse, Fred Ebb, and
John Kander in 1975. The students
have tried to stay true to Fosse's
original production.
CHICAGO will be presented at the
Power Center March 23, 24, 25 at 8
p.m. There will also be a matinee
show Sunday, March 26 at 2 p.m.
Tickets are available at the Union
ticket office for $6 and $7.
ROOMMATES
GOING to CHICAGO this SUMMER?
Want to live downtown?
Need a female roommate.
Starting in May.
Call 747-7198--leave message.
NEED A PLACE 2nd TERM NEXT YEAR?
Seeking 1 F. roomie. Gorgeous house 662-
9245.
NEEDED 1 SINGLE RM FOR FALL
TERM ONLY.
Call Joan at 747-9133.
ONE ROOM in 6 bdrm. house. Parking,
laundry, May-May lease. Ph. 769-1797.
ROOMMATE WANTED: I non-smoking
female. May to May single in 4 bdrm. apt, in
PRIME location - 1 min. from DIAG, CCRB,
Geddes bus stop. Call Maggie 995-5046.
SEEKING: non-smoking male students for
newly remodeled, furnished house. Parking,
laundry available. Sept. -Sept Lease
$190/month + elec. Call JP 764-03.
Starting Fall '89-Share quality 2 bedroom
condo with 1 rson; 1/ mile to UM main
camus (839 E. Kingsley), furnished, air,
$350/month + electricity. Grad. student pre-
ferred. Call 761-6226.
WINTER '90 quiet/nonsmoking female. Own
room at U Towers apt. Annie 764-3640.
Your OWN room in a 3-bedroom apt is
waiting for YOU at U. Towers! 9/89 to 4/90.
Call for details now 769-5720.
BAND NEEDED
for W. Quad's MONTE CARLO NIGHT
night of April 1
Casino dealers al so needed
call 764-7755
DO YOUR PART to eliminate the problem
of homelessness in Ann Arbor! Buy a t-shirt
from Students for the Homeless for only $10.
WHERE? On the Diag & in the Fishwl.
WHEN? March 22 & 3.
LESBIAN and GAY GREEKS
Meeting: Thursday, March 23, 4:30 pm. Call
763-4186 for more information.
THE WOMEN'S ISSUES COMMITEE of
MSA is sponsoring a bi-weekly "women's
rap session'. This meeting is designed for all
women on campus and provides a forum
wherenwomen can share information, suc-
cesses, ideas, etc. regarding current projects
and issues. We will be gathering in the MSA
Chambers 3909 Michigan Union at 7:00Pm.
Thursday March 23. Refreshments wil be
served. For more information contact Com-
mittee Co-Chairs, Robbie Lambix or Jennifer
Van Valey at MSA or call, 763-3241.
TICKETS
GRATEFUL DEAD tickets: frt. row & main
floor. April 5. Call 963-8422- Scott.
GREATFUL DEAD TICKETS. Only a few
good seats left. 764-4735 after 4.

ne Midland Center for
yers to do a show this
heater there generously
d they want plays to put
formances over the last
ctions spanning the en-
ased with the response,

Records ,, f 0 0 4 0 0 0 0

WE WON'T PAY! WE WON'T PAY! will be per-
formed at the Trueblood Theatre at 8 p.m. Thursdays
through Saturday until April 1, with matinees at 2
p.m. March 26 and April 2. Tickets are $7 general ad-
mission, $5for students and may be purchased at the
Michigan League Ticket Office.

Depeche Mode
Depeche Mode 101
Sire
Dig this: an explosion of me-
chanical energy. "Pimpf," an am-
biguous catch word designed to take
an individualized meaning to the lis-
tener, coupled with piano "wrath of
God" music. In this context, pimpf
probably means pain, death, or de-
struction. The song, the finale of
last year's Depeche model, becomes
an intro build-up to what we could
quite accurately call a "black
celebration." That's right, more for
the hungry masses - it's 101, a
double album recorded live at the
Pasadena Rose Bowl.
Next, the nihilistic "Behind the

Wheel" is delivered with faithful and
accurate maliciousness, for great ef-
fect. The song takes a lyrically very
pop concept, i.e. "my little girl/
you're behind the wheel tonight/ I'm
in the hands of fate" and delivers it
in an apocalyptic, malevolent light.
The theory of putting the girl in
control of his life is considered
putting himself on the line. A nice
perversion, and you can dance to it,
too. The dark theme exhibited in the
Orwellian "Music For the Masses"
dominates this record as well. The
result: a hip, revolutionary newspeak
that interprets our overall cultural
consciousness as well, if not better
than, any social critic you can name.
The concept continues through an

equally faithful "Strangelove" with
emphasis given to the line, "pain/
will you return it?! I'll say it again'
pain." Hits "Never Let Me Down
Again," "People Are People,"
"Somebody," "Things You Said,"
and "Black Celebration" are included.
As the record continues, a recurring
theme of darkness emerges, and I
admit, I like it. The problem stems
from delivery here. The songs are all
transferred very well from studio to
live mode, considering that they use
drum machines and sequencers
extensively in concert. It's just that
almost no progress is made here. No
attempt is made to improve on the
songs, and this becomes a retread.
See Records, Page 8

NUTS AND BOLTS By Judd A. Winick

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