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March 21, 1989 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-21

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 21, 1989 - Page 3

Mich. House to,
debate incinerated
Sash bill today

Speaker addresses
Nicaraguan 'crisis'

BY NOELLE SHADWICK
The Michigan House of Repre-
sentatives is expected to debate today
whether to accept a substitute for a
proposed bill that would allow in-
cinerated ash to be dumped into
monofill landfills.
The substitute bill incorporates
more stringent standards for the dis-
posal of incinerated ash than an ear-
lier form of the bill, said House
Conservation Committee chair Rep-
resentative Tom Alley (D-Arenac
County).
If passed, the bill would require
incinerated ash - found in some
cases to be hazardous - to be placed
in landfills specifically designated for
flyash.
Incinerated ash has been found in
some cases to contain high levels of
heavy metals, especially lead, and
environmentalists suspect that addi-
tional hazardous substances, such as
dioxin, may be created by the incin-
eration process. However, there is
currently no way to test dioxin lev-
els in incinerated ash.
The revised proposal comes after
several environmental and health
groups opposed the original bill,
saying it would turn any non-haz-
ardous landfill into a potentially
hazardous waste site.
"As originally drafted, (the bill)
Economists
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
recent spurt of inflation is raising
fears of a recession, with some
economists predicting that a down-
turn could begin in the second half
of 1989.
Analysts believe that the Federal
Reserve,faced with alarming news
of increasing price pressures, will
squeeze credit so tightly that an eco-
nomic slump will be inevitable.
"Once you get inflation up to the
levels we have right now, it has
taken a recession to cool things off.
That is an unfortunate fact of life,"
said Bruce Steinberg, senior
economist at the New York invest-
ment firm of Merrill Lynch.
Inflation worries were heightened
last Friday when the government re-

would have exempted incinerated ash
from being properly disposed of,"
said Carol Favero, resource attorney
for the Michigan United Conserva-
tion Club, an opponent group the
bill.
Under existing Environmental
Protection Agency laws, incinerated
ash must be tested, and hazardous
ash must be disposed of in a haz-
ardous waste site.
The proposed bill would require
all incinerated ash, regardless of
whether it is hazardous, to be placed
in open monofills. The bill outlines
standards for the composition,
thickness and number of the landfill
linings.
"The (proposed substitute) still
isn't as tough as a true hazardous
landfill," said Andrew Buchsbaum,
program director of the Public Inter-
est Research Group in Michigan. "It
doesn't meet all our criteria, but it is
a lot better," he said.
Environmentalists say incinerated
ash is a more hazardous form of the
materials placed into the incinera-
tors.
But University Chemical Engi-
neering Prof. Eugene Glyssen said
the ash is usually considered more
hazardous only when mixed with
other materials and that a monofill
landfill eliminates the extent of the

BY JESSICA STRICK
"The situation of Nicaragua is an
authentic modern tragedy. After al-
most half a century of heroic insur-
rection and blood we are farther away
from democracy," and satisfactory
living conditions than ever, said
W speaker Fausto Amador yesterday at
Rackham Amphitheater.
Amador's speech was part of the
Coalition for Democracy in Latin
America's program for Central
America Awareness Week.
Amador, a Marxist from
Nicaragua now acting as the Costa
Rican executive director of the Na-
tional Patriotic Committee, told a
crowd of about 30 that he supports
neither the anti-Somoza regime nor
the contras in Nicaragua, recalling
the brutal acts of violence on both
sides.
After discovering that most of his
friends had been killed in Nicaragua
ELEN LEVY/Daily while he was receiving military
Speaker Fausto Amador, executive director of the Costa Rican training in Cuba, Amador disassoci-
National Patriotic Committee, calls for Central America to follow the ated himself from the Sandinista
democratic model of Costa Rica. Liberation Front, believing in the

need for a nonviolent alternative to
the anti-Somoza organization.
At the same time, Amador
strongly criticized the contras for
prolonging their futile battle against
the Nicaraguan government and peo-
ple. "The biggest mistake of the
U.S. administration was the
assumption that the Sandinistas
would give up. They are like old fa-
natics - they will fight to the death
rather than succumb to oppression,"
he said.
"Liberation has brought no
equality, no bread," Amador said,
explaining that the Nicaraguan gov-
ernment tends to "use the excuse of
war to explain every single eco-
nomic failure."
While Amador stressed that the
U.S. has a "huge human and ethical
responsibility" towards the contra
peasants who are living in desperate
conditions, he emphasized that aid
should not be given to influence or
"distort the political conclusions of
Nicaragua."

I I

hazard.
"The idea is that when mixed
with other materials it causes some
problems, but that it is better if it is
just put by itself," he said.
Michigan currently has three
working incinerators, and four under
construction.

"We think what we've come up
with is a very good bill," Alley said.
If the substitute bill is accepted, a
vote on the bill could be delayed for
24 hours. If the House rejects the
substitute, a vote on the proposal
could be taken today.

forsee first recession in seven years

ported that prices at the wholesale
level had shot up a full percentage
point for the second straight month.
It was the worst back-to-back
news in nearly eight years and it sent
stock and bond prices plunging as
investors worried that the Federal
Reserve would be forced to drive in-
terest rates higher in an effort to
dampen demand.
Markets continued to be battered
by inflation worries yesterday with
the Dow Jones industrial average of
30 stocks down sharply again after
the 48.57 drop on Friday, which had
been the worst decline in nearly a
year.
Investors were braced for an even
bigger market drop today if the gov-
ernment's monthly check of con-

sumer prices comes in with a worse- 0.5 percent increase would translate
than-expected number. into an annual advance above 6 per-
Economists fear that a rise in cent, significantly higher than the
consumer prices of 0.7 percent could inflation rate of 4.4 percent of the
send markets in a tailspin. Even a last seven years.
Career Options After Graduation
Psychology Majors
Speakers to discuss various career
paths in psychology
7 pm Wed. March 22 W. Lounge S. Quad
Sponsored by the Undergraduate Psych Society

Your education will not end with graduation. As a graduate
nurse at Rochester Methodist Hospital, you will receive a
comprehensive twelve-week long orientation where you will
further develop your professional skills. Beyond orientation,
you will have the challenges and the growth opportunities
that a world-class medical center can provide.
Graduate Nurses apply now for positions available in 1989.
Starting salary $26,228. Attractive benefit package.
Rochester Methodist Hospital is an 800-bed Mayo
Foundation Hospital. Choose challenge.-Choose growth.
Choose Rochester Methodist Hospital.
Rochester Methodist Hospital, Personnel Services,
Nursing Recruitment Section, 201 West Center Street,
Rochester, MN 55902, (507) 286-7091 (Collect).
Rochester Methodist Hospital
A MAYO FOUNDATION HOSPITAL
An Equal Opportunity Employer

STUDENT'S
PRESIDENT

CHOICE
VICE-PRESIDENT

ROBERT BELL

JAMES McBAIN

Under his chairmanship
" The Communications Committee
revitalized MSA's monthly news-
letter, The Campus Report
- Sponsored the first MSA Public-
ity Drive
" Coordinated the first MSA Safety
Symposium
" Coordinated the first scientific
survey of student opinion at Michi-
gan

LSA
SARA BILLMANN
LEONARD KLEINOW
KAREN LIBERTINY
ROB LIPS
PAUL MARQUARDT
LANCE PACERNICK
JON POLISH
DANIEL QUICK
GRETCHEN WALTER
ART
ELIZABETH MOLDENHAUER
BUSINESS
LAURA PETERSON

Responsible for
" Organizing MSA's first MTS
Conference, MSA: TALKS,
which is the fastest growing con-
ference at Michigan
" Currently, the chairman of the
MSA Consulting Task Force, a
committee designated to improve
MSA's relationship with the Uni-
versity community

ENGINEERING
ERIC FERGUSON
STEVE FREEMAN
NURSING
EMILY PORTER
LAW
TIM BRINK

VOTE

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