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March 20, 1989 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-20

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 20, 1989- Page 5

Free Press
Continued from Page 1
logo as the Free Press, and was dis-
tributed with the paper, grounds for a
law suit could be in order if it is
found that readers were likely to be
confused, Litman said.
In addition, The Free Press could
bring civil suit against the distribu-
tors because they interfered with the
distribution of the paper, she said.
Because only 3,000 copies of the
"Free Free Press" were distributed,
many students were not aware of its
.publication.
Third-year law student Robert
,Romanoff said that when he saw the
paper he knew it wasn't The Free
,Press, but was interested to read it.
While describing the publication as
"creative," he said the paper was un-
fair. "It implies that there is an en-
tire media conspiracy. It's taking ad-
vantage of The Free Press."
Although he had not seen the pa-
per, LSA senior Rob Hubbs said
that the its publication was great.
"There are things that go on in the
world that the media has to say and
not surround it in crap."
A spokesperson for The Free
Press declined comment yesterday.
But in an article published Saturday
in the Free Press, Publisher and
Chair David Lawrence Jr. said, "It's
"dishonest and despicable conduct. It
violates the integrity of the paper.
They have tampered with our in-
.tegrity. We are not the handmaiden
,of any interest group."

Three new faculty to
be elected to SACUA

BY MARION DAVIS
Today, the Senate Assembly, a central fo-
rum for representatives from all University
schools and colleges, will be electing three of
its members to serve on the Senate Advisory
Committee on University Affairs (SACUA).
Each year three new faculty are elected to
the nine-member committee.
The six candidates running for the vacated
positions are Sharon Brooks, medicine; Wal-
ter Mignolo, LSA; Robert Grosse, public
health; Peggie Hollingsworth, medicine;
Walter Debler, engineering; and James Diana,
natural resources.
Outgoing SACUA Chair Beth Reed, a
professor of social work and women's studies,
said the committee has made progress this
year in aiding the University's attempt to
create a more diverse educational environ-
ment.
"We've worked in a number of ways to-
wards a multicultural university," Reed said
pointing out that in its weekly meetings
SACUA has always tried to include discus-
sion of some issue relevant to the Michigan
Mandate and how the committee can become
more involved in the diversity process.
The committee meets monthly with
Charles Moody, vice-provost for minority af-
fairs, and other executive officers to keep a
direct line of communication between faculty
and the administration.
Reed said that although SACUA will be a
time commitment for the newly elected
members, it will also provide a way for them
to see another perspective of the University.

'We've worked to stimulate a
more active faculty governance. '
- Beth Reed,
outgoing SACUA chair

"SACUA does take time, but it also al-
lows you access to information (as to how
the University works)."
Reed also noted that new members should
expect to work for a more well- informed fac-
ulty about critical issues facing the Univer-
sity. "We've worked to stimulate a more ac-
tive faculty governance," Reed said.
Outgoing SACUA member Lorraine
Nadlemen, a psychology professor, said she
would like to see a continuing effort by new
members to be more proactive than reactive.
"We have to find out what the faculty thinks
and wants and bring this up to the admin-
istration," Nadlemen said.
Besides being the governing board of the
90-member Senate Assembly, SACUA
members serve as liaisons to various Univer-
sity committees.
Philip Margolis, representing the Medical
School, is the third SACUA member com-
pleting his term on the board.

JOSE JUAREZIDIiy
Julie Trebilcock, an LSA sophomore, looks over Friday's Daily and "Free Free
Press" while sitting in the Fishbowl. Readers of the Daily and Detroit Free Press
found them wrapped in the other paper.

Botha's successor raises hopes in South Africa

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa
(AP) - The selection of F.W. de
Klerk as President P.W. Botha's
"successor is contributing to a surge
'of hope for a peaceful breakthrough
'in South Africa's political stalemate.
a So far, however, the optimistic
,musings are coming almost ex-
elusively from whites.
Black leaders make clear they will
be relieved when Botha steps down.
But they suspect his heir apparent
will preside over changes more
cosmetic than substantive.
Mangosuthu Buthelezi, the Zulu
political leader denounced by many
Black activists as too conservative,
says he will oppose de Klerk until
the government gives blacks full
voting rights. There is no sign de
Klerk contemplates such action.
At the other end of the Black

political leader spectrum, the African
National Congress guerrilla move-
ment says changes under de Klerk
will be in personal style, not
National Party policy.
De Klerk and Botha "are pieces of
the same carcass," spokesperson
Tom Sebina said from the outlawed
movement's exile headquarters in
Lusaka, Zambia. "If the meat is bad,
the meat is bad."
Botha, resumed his presidential
duties last week after an eight-week
convalescence from a stroke. In the
interim, he resigned as National
Party leader and was replaced de
Klerk, the minister of national
education.
In a dramatic chain of events,
Nationalist newspapers and pol-
iticians began suggesting that Botha
should retire; Botha responded by

declaring he would stay in office
until next year, and the party's
parliamentary caucus resolved that it
wanted de Klerk to be president.
However, the party has neither
the constitutional power nor the
appetite to force Botha from office.
De Klerk said Friday he will seek
cordial coexistence with the president

while urging his party to "break new
ground" in pursuing political reform.
De Klerk has never been viewed
as liberal, but supporters and skep-
tics alike depict him as more open-
minded and less imperious than
Botha, who has headed the go-
vernment since 1978.

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR I
F~iSTUDENTS WHO NEED'
MONEY FOR COLLEGEI
U
Every Student is Eligible for Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
We have a data bank of over 200,000 listings of scholarships,
fellowships, grants, and loans, representing over $10 billion in private I
sector funding. U
" Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic
interests, career plans, family heritage and place of residence.
- There's money available for students who have been newspaper car- I
riers, grocery clerks, cheerleaders, non-smokers ... etc. I
* Results GUARANTEED.

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STUDENT' S
PRESIDENT

CHOICE
VICE-PRESIDENT

ROBERT BELL

JAMES McBAIN

Under his chairmanship
. The Communications Committee
revitalized MSA's monthly news-
letter, The Campus Report
- Sponsored the first MSA Public-
ity Drive
- Coordinated the first MSA Safety
Symposium
" Coordinated the first scientific
survey of student opinion at Michi-
gan

LSA
SARA BILLMANN
LEONARD KLEINOW
KAREN LIBERTINY
ROB LIPS
PAUL MARQUARDT
LANCE PACERNICK
JON POLISH
DANIEL QUICK
GRETCHEN WALTER
ART
ELIZABETH MOLDENHAUER
BUSINESS
LAURA PETERSON

Responsible for
- Organizing MSA's first MTS
Conference, MSA: TALKS,
which is the fastest growing con-
ference at Michigan
- Currently, the chairman of the
MSA Consulting Task Force, a
committee designated to improve
MSA's relationship with the Uni-
versity community

ENGINEERING
ERIC FERGUSON
STEVE FREEMAN
NURSING
EMILY PORTER
LAW
TIM BRINK

VOTE

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