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March 17, 1989 - Image 18

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-17
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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0 ~ ~

I a9OIA

F

Kana offers authentic,
delightful Korean food

w
By Laura Cohn and
Amanda Neuman
For people who enjoy spicy Ko-
rean food, eating at Kana will be a
delight.
The menu offers a wide sampling
of authentic Korean cuisine. Al-
though the names of the dishes
might be foreign sounding to some,
each dish comes with its own de-
scription. Chicken, vegetable, sea-
food, and noodle entrees are offered
and prices range from a modest
$5.95 for vegetable dishes to $11.50
for seafood. Since choosing just one
entree may be difficult (they are all
equally delicious), Kana offers a
buffet on Saturday evenings and dur-
ing the week for lunch from 11:30
to 2:00.
The buffet, a panoply of oriental

cuisine, is laid out from appetizer to
dessert. Five different plate sizes are
needed to accommodate each course.
As soon as you clear your plate, a
waiter comes to take it away. But
don't feel guilty about taking sec-
onds, or in our case, thirds. For
$10.99, the buffet allows you to try
items that you otherwise might not
dare order, like Choo jingo, a hot
squid dish.
The first thing to try is
Dubuchigae, a hot spicy soup with
tofu, vegetables, and noodles. Don't
be alarmed by the tofu. If your aren't
partial to bean curd, you should at
least have the warm broth.
Two wonderful appetizers are
vegetable tempura, vegetables
lightly fried and tossed together, and
Kunmandu, a tangy egg-roll-type

dumpling with tofu and vegetables.
Both can be dipped in either soy or
plum sauce.
Two salads precede the entrees.
The cold noodles are seasoned with a
delightful sesame sauce and topped
with slivers of egg and assorted
spices. Bean sprout salad is another
crunchy option.
The first entree, Dok Bokum, is a
wonderful combination of small
cylindrical, chewy rice cakes with
green peppers and carrots. Steamed
brown and white rice comes on the
side. Chap Chai, another popular
item, has a pleasingly different con-
sistency with vermicelli noodles and
vegetables.
The spiciest dish by far is Kim
Chi, a pickled cabbage in a sharp,
bitter sauce, which leaves a burning
See Kana. Pane 13

Nation
Continued from Page 9
But others do not see criticism of
Israel or of Zionism as anti-Semitic.
"I think some of the establish-
ment Jewish organizations, like the
ADL, have trivialized anti-
Semitism," said the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Committee's
Faris Bouhafa.
"Anti-Semitism is a real problem
and a real form of racism," Bouhafa
said. "But when you try to equate
criticism of Israeli policy with it,
you cheapen the term and render it
meaningless."
"Being anti-Zionist just cannot
be equated with anti-Semitism," he
said.
Norman Finkelstein, a political
science professor at Brooklyn Col-
lege and a "revisionist" scholar of
Israeli history, also said there is no
connection between anti-Semitism
and anti-Zionism.
"Historically, there have been
two significant elements within Ju-
daism criticizing the concept of
Zionism without being anti-
Semitic," Finkelstein said. "Some
Jews were critical because the fear
was that if you establish a state be-
longing to Jews, it would throw
suspicion on Jews living elsewhere"
because one could tell Jews to leave

a country and "go to Palestine."
"A second group wanted a Jewish
cultural state but not a Jewish polit-
ical state, because that is inherently
discriminatory to non-Jews," he
said.
"If that kind of criticism wasn't
improper then, what makes it im-
proper now?" Finkelstein asked.
But even while most Jewish
leaders agree that there is
some anti-Semitism
involved in anti-Zionism and criti-
cism of Israel, there is some ques-
tion as to where one can draw the
line between legitimate political de-
bate and bigotry.
"On the one hand, criticism of
Israel need not imply anti-
Semitism," said the American Jew-
ish Congress's Harris. "But on the
other hand, some of the criticism of
Israel oversteps the bounds of
political debate and goes into anti-
Semitism."
"I can't quantify it," he said. "But
I know it when I see it."
The ADL's 1988 audit notes a
number of incidents of anti-Zionism
and anti-Israel incidents which could
certainly qualify as examples of anti-
Semitism:
-four synagogues last year in the
Palm Beach, Fla. area were vandal-
ized with graffiti including "Victory
Uprising" and "Abu Jihad";
- on Nov. 10, 1988 spray-painted

swastikas and slogans such as "Kill
the Kikes" and "Zionazi racists" were
found on the wall of the Jewish
Student Center at SUNY-Bingham-
ton; and
-vandals sprayed "PLO" on the
front of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Building at the University of Min-
nesota.
But other instances of anti-Zion-
ism and criticism of Israel cited as
anti-Semitic by Jewish leaders are
not so clear cut.
"One common theme is the inor-
dinate attention in the media paid to
Israel and the concomitant lack of
attention paid to worse human rights
violations," said Harris.
He added that recent media atten-
tion on Israel since the intifadeh is
"unconscious anti-Semitism" since
Israel-related stories often land on the
front page, but the use of chemical
weapons by Iraq, the "deliberate use
of children in the battlefield by Iran,"
and the recent Amnesty International
report on the government's kidnap-
ping and torture of the children of
dissenters in Iraq are stories buried
deep in the newxpages.
Harris calls this a "dual standard"
and a form of "moral hypocrisy."
"The U.S. has been engaged in
crimes against humanity far beyond
anything Israel has done," Lerner
said. "But people say Israel has no
right to exist and the reason is they
are anti-Semitic."

Many think criticism of Is-
rael and its practices is
acceptable political
debate, but think rejection of the
concept of Zionism, which is "the
national liberation of the Jewish
people," by Lerner's definition, is an
anti-Semitic attitude.
"To say I'm against Black libera-
tion or women's liberation - that
means I'm racist or sexist," Lerner
said. "So to say Jews don't have the
same right to a nation as the Rus-
sians, or Chinese, or Japanese, or
any other national grouping - What
is that? That's anti-Semitism."
But Lerner was quick to point out
that "it is totally responsible to crit-
icize Israel. What is going on there
is both immoral and stupid."
"Most American Jews are critical
of Israel, but the leaders of many
Jewish organizations aren't doing
that because they are afraid of weak-
ening Israel," he said.
Lerner is not alone in his senti-
ments:
"Zionism to me personally is at
its core, but not necessarily in prac-
tice, a national liberation. move-
ment," Rawson said. "To say that is
racist is way out of line."
* "On the other hand, saying 'I
think the way Zionism is practiced
is wrong' is not anti-Semitic," he
said.
Mark Talisman, Director of the
Council of Jewish Federations'

Washir
nation
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WEEKEND/JOSE JUAREZ

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DO

YOU

KNOW

Who's
Your

Spending
Money?

$

$

$

$

$

Make

sure it

s o eon you want

MSA Elections
March 21 & 22

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WT 111].1 IILJI\L .7Jtj'orjuu

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4100 CARPENTER RD. ANN ARBOR 1 Maple Village Shp. Ctr.
ON THE SITE OF THE FORMER UNIVERSITY DRIVE-IN

769-1300

PAGE 6

WEEKEND/ MARCH 17,1989

WEEKEND/ MARCH 17,1989

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