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March 17, 1989 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-17
Note:
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Kana
Continued from Page 6
aftertaste. Consequently, water glas-
ses are constantly refilled by an
understanding waiter.
Kana's atmosphere contributes to
the enjoyment of the meal. There are
only thirteen tables in the restaurant,
which is actually quite cozy. Chop-
sticks are provided for the experi-
enced gourmand. The soft twang of
Korean music emanates unobtru-
sively in the background. Baskets,
fans, andhotherdunusual artifacts
adorn niches and walls, and low-
hanging rice paper lamps give off a
soft light. The overall effect is
peaceful and relaxing.

Kun Hi Ko, the owner of Kana,
prepares all the food. Every so often
she emerges from her kitchen to
greet her guests and offer compli-
mentary ginger tea. She created the
buffet to introduce people to all
kinds of Korean cuisine. The Ko
family operates Kana together, and
their commitment pays off: they en-
joy serving customers as much as
customers enjoy their food.
Kana is a small, comfortable
place to enjoy a fulfilling meal with
friends or family. Every dish has its
own unique and zesty flavor. One
visit stimulates the tastebuds and
leaves an indelible memory of a
genuine Korean dinner.

Campus
Continued from Page 8
torn off. Aboud said he did not know
who was responsible.
Aboud said PSC challenged Tagar
to a debate last November, but the
group declined. He also said Tagar
does not recognize the rights of
Palestinians. "Until they recognize
Palestinians as people with equal
rights, I can't see having a dia-
logue."
But Hope said Tagar does recog-
nize the rights of Palestinians and
would hold a debate with PSC if it
was moderated by a neutral entity.

"I'm not opposed to dialogue, but
it's not like it's going to change
anything," Hope said. "Arabs want a
state for Arabs, Jews want a state for
Jews. You can talk about it for 20
years.,
Discussion, however, may be
working for some groups on cam-
pus. Once a week, a group of Jewish
and Arab students talk and challenge
each other about the uprisings and
the road to a solution. The group's
meetings are closed to the public to
protect a tenuous relationship built
on mutual trust that took months to
cement, said Gayle Kirschenbaum, a
member of the group and editor of

Prospe
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said "I
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Jews tc
Israel.
coming
being
Israel."

By Greg Ferland
Joe Clark can really kick some
butt, and Lean on Me will show
you just how he does it.
Morgan Freeman (Street Smart,
Clean and Sober) plays Joe Clark,
principal of New Jersey's Paterson
High School. The plot, based on a
true story, shows how Clark ruled
the high school - both its teachers
and its students - and brought it
out of social and academic decay.
Clark is known for carrying a bull-
horn and baseball bat, representing
how he deals with kids who go
wrong. If kids take or deal drugs,
they get booted out of school for-
ever; if drug dealers try to enterrthe
school, Clark chains the doors from
the inside. You get the picture.
Clark is undoubtedly a contro-
versial subject and to the film's
credit it points out his triumphs as
well as his many faults. He
successfully cleans up the school,
but he also alienates everyone around
him. Unfortunately, the film does
not carry through as successfully as
Clark.
The first half of Lean on Me is
very strong. We see how Clark deals
with people and situations, making
us cheer his actions at some mo-
ments and berate him at others. The
portrayal of the school as a jungle
(Guns and Roses' "Welcome to the

For Exam Preparation
Choose to EXCEL!

The real Joe Clark (right) poses with his portrayer in the film,
Morgan Freeman.

Jungle" is played over the opening
credits) is done very successfully.
It's a gritty, graffitied hell-hole
where the students run wild and the
teachers are helpless. Director John
Avildsen creates a real sense of dan-
ger as he pans through the dark
hallways of Paterson High.
But Avildsen is also responsible
for the film's collapse. Once Clark
has gained some control over the
school and Its problems, the plot has

no place to take him. Conflicts are
created (test scores must be raised,
the school board may suspend Clark)
but they all seem to ring false,
though based on fact. The viewer is
assaulted by the constant din of ar-
guments. And the plot sometimes
comes to a screeching halt just so
Avildsen can inject a pop song to
make the soundtrack a hit. Some
scenes are even poorly dubbed and
out of focus.
Avildsen also suffers from "It's a
Wonderful Life Syndrome,"
building to a climax and then ending
the film by smothering the main
character with hugs. It seems
Avildsen ails from this disease rather
See Lean, Page 7

In Skin Deep, John Ritter
(Three's Company, Hooperman) de-
parts from his rewarding television
career to try his hand at motion pic-
tures. Ritter plays Zach, a successful
writer-playwright whose constant
affairs with younger women have
jeopardized his marriage to Alex
(Alyson Reed), a television anchor.
The film follows his affairs and his
attempts to straighten out his life
and his marriage.
The film is quite similar to 10 in
the characterization of the protago-
nist. Ritter, like Dudley Moore,
plays a successful man who tries to
reach out for his lost youth in his
pursuit of younger women. Both
characters develop problems in the
comedy framework of their films and
turn to bartenders, lawyers, and ana-
lysts for solutions. In Skin Deep,
these supporting characters are por-
trayed by Vincent Gardenia, Joel
Brooks, and Michael Kidd, respec-
tively.
Ritter handles his leading role
with flair, intelligence, and sensitiv-
ity while maintaining his invaluable
comic charm for slapstick and gag
humor. The rest of the cast, with the
exception of Kidd and his publisher,
Sparky (Peter Donat), are dry and
unsupportive of Ritter's direction.
The many women in the cast who
provide Zach with his numerous af-
fairs are merely showpieces, and

none of their characters are explored
with the depth necessary to aid the
film. 10 had two primary female
characters, Skin Deep has nine.
Despite the problems of copying
10 and having too large of a cast,
Edwards does manage to inject a dose
of his unmistakable talents in the
film, and the results are somesgen-
uinely funny scenes. One such scene
has Zach, clad only in underwear,
doing aerobics at 6 a.m. with female
bodybuilders. Another features the
motion pictures' first glow-in-the-
dark condom. Putting silliness aside,
these episodes represent Edwards'
mature and stylish handling.
As with other Blake Edwards
comedies, Skin Deep has an impor-
tant element of serious drama. In 10,
it was Dudley Moore fighting to win
Julie Andrews back. In Skin Deep,
Ritter fights to win back Reed. The
main difference is that in 10, the se-
rious drama rounded out the film and
added character and texture to the
movie. But in this new film, the se-
rious drama detracts from the film
and harms the overall comedic
intentions.
*See Skin, Page 7

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PAGE 4

WEEKEND/ MARCH v, ,989

WEEKEND/ MARCH 17.1989 °

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